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9

Milled grain does have a shorter shelf-life, but you don't need to worry about it unless you are trying to mill more than a month in advance. I used to get my grain milled and shipped to me and I would use it when I got around to doing a brew. I never noticed major taste differences within about a month of being milled, and I was just using cardboard boxes ...


8

You can make a flour from the grain, and follow any of the recipes listed here: Spent Grain Chef.


8

The only definitive information I could find specific to your question was in the book Malts and Malting: '[Malt] must be stored cool and dry in sealed stores [...] to arrest the decline in enzyme levels' One brief and somewhat vague sentence in 750 pages may give you an idea of how little professional maltsters and brewers seem to concern themselves ...


7

Honestly, there's often more than 5ºL variation between batches of crystal by the same maltster, so I'd probably just buy the 80L and be done with it. But, if you want to try to be more precise, the Morey equation for SRM (which is what most software uses) just assumes a linear proportional effect. So, you'd want 3 parts 80ºL to 1 part 60ºL. In other words:...


6

First, keep in mind that Mr. wizard is a commercial brewer and his answers come from that point of view. It may not be applicable to homebrewers. Using wheat may be about the only case where using a protein rest may be of benefit. But it'a not a given. There are still proteolytic enzymes left in the malt. Due to the high protein content of wheat, it can ...


5

The only real difference between pale and pils malt is about 1L of color. The flavor is actually pretty similar. The best thing to do is to experiment with different pale malts to see if on brand is closer to what you want. In terms of what you've got right now, an all pale malt mash will taste remarkably similar to an all pils malt mash. I've done the ...


5

It was a lucky guess. There is nothing in that grist bill specific to an IPA. AAMOF, it's NOT an IPA! The OG is too low, for one thing. The recipe even calls itself a pale ale, not an IPA. As to what makes an IPA an IPA, the best ROT is the BU:GU ratio. An IPA will usually be in the 1.060-1.075 OG range and have at least a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.


5

The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) makes an attempt to describe styles such as this. One such style is IPA (grouped into 3 subcategories: English IPA, American IPA, and Imperial IPA). Have a look: http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style14.php You're right that the hop character defines the IPA style. However, a traditional IPA has some restrictions on ...


5

That means you would use it at 3-15% of your total grain bill. Let's say you had a recipe that used used 10lbs of grain in total. They are recommending that you wouldn't want more than 4.8oz-1.5lb of this amount to be Biscuit Malt. They suggest these limits, because the flavors imparted by these grains can possibly overwhelm other components of the beer. ...


5

Absolutely! I rinse after use then throw them in with my laundry whites. Couple tips. These don't have to be sterile or even sanitized. A good rinse is really the only functional need they have. If washing with laundry. Use fragrance free detergent with an extra rinse cycle. I just use oxyclean. Makes them soft and bright again. Air / line dry them. Don'...


5

I buy my 2-row in 40kg bags which lasts me one or two years, no problem there. The flavor is not an issue, the gravity will still be there. However, when it comes to speciality grain, if they are not crushed it is much better. After crushing them, they will lose their freshness quickly if not sealed properly, and flavor fades a little. The roasted ...


4

You can scale malt, hops and volumes linearly. While in principle hops don't scale linearly, it's almost linear, and depends upon your kettle geometry. It's not enough of a difference to worry about - the difference is less than the error introduced due to measuring your hops to the nearest 0.1g. Evaporation is also due to kettle geometry, although this ...


4

Since (most) smokers don't actually burn the "smoking fuel" directly, you should find that a lot of smoke is generated, you should also find that since the spent grain is fairly damp, the amount of smoke you obtain is larger than that from the normal smoke chips when soaked in water. Most smokers that I've seen use a propane burner to heat a smoke box that ...


4

I'll answer specifically for this type of mill. Since it uses grind plates, it should work. I would run a handful through to see what it looks like. Remember, you want the hulls to be more or less whole and the meat of the grain to be crushed a bit (smaller pieces mean more surface area to volume ratio). This might be fine for small batches but it you ...


4

I ordered too large of a bag of roasted chocolate grains, so I've had it two years now. I store it in a dry place, checking regularly to make sure the grains look and taste fine. I've used them in multiple beers over 2 years and had no issues. Granted those are really flavorful grains, so that may help. But I didn't taste any difference between the first ...


3

Most maltsters ship their grains in bags that are not air-tight, but they don't recommend storing them for long periods of time (12 months, max). A plastic jug isn't as air-tight as it seems because it is gas permeable. Even if it was air-tight, it wouldn't matter unless you used nitrogen or CO2 to flush-out all oxygen from the container. Nobody really ...


3

I am planning on buying a Country Living Mill, and I am both baking and brewing. I was researching if the mill could be used for crushing malt as well. A lot of people have been asking this question, but I've only found one person actually having tried it. According to him it crushes the malt nicely and leaves the husks. Here is the link: http://www....


3

all you composters. Add your trub to compost. its a great way to get and keep your compost process going. bugs love food and moisture. I actually eat some of it like cereal on brew days. Some of it goes in the frig too. Some honey. Blueberries or other fruit. Warmed milk. Right out of mash, it is still warm. I compost the rest and share with ...


3

No diastatic power Means that this malt does not have the required enzymes to break down starches into sugars. In other words, you need to add some malt that has diastatic power in conjunction to make it work. The diastatic power is measured in Lintner degrees. It is estimated that you need a minimum 30°L in your mash to have sufficient diastatic power ...


3

That actually look really good. Looks like the moisture is keeping the husk from shredding and you have nice crush on the grain. I'm constantly pushing finer and finer for more efficiency. As we all should to know what your system can handle. Stuck sparge isn't the end of the world. Easily fixed by pumping or flowing wort back through false bottom, then ...


2

I put mine out around the birdfeeder, they acted like they were at a banquet, it was gone in about two hours. (1 lb from an grain-extract kit)


2

It depends on what type of malt but assuming you are looking at base malts this should be accurate, It's directly from Briess's website referring to 2 row pale malt. Darker roasted malts will differ somewhat. STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a temperate, low humidity, pest free environment at temperatures of <90 ºF. Improperly stored malts are prone ...


2

I am primarily a one-gallon brewer. I have never adjusted a recipe, so I can't answer the question on AAUs. But I can tell you from experience that you can "scale" dry yeast on pretty much a linear basis. My method: I use the Mr. Malty Pitching Rate Calculator, and then use this $6 digital scale to weigh the dry yeast. I overpitch slightly from Mr. ...


2

One of my earlier attempts was to use a manual pasta maker in place of a crusher. First, I took out rollers and roughed and knurled them as much as possible using a couple files. Then I screwed it onto a board, removed the handle and attached an electric drill. Overall, it worked, and I went through a couple bags of grain with it (50kg total), but then it ...


2

Those old Brew Your Own recipes are a little vague on ingredients, and hard to figure out. You have an added handicap of being in the Eurozone, it seems. Likely the 3.3 bs. of amber light extract is LME (because in the U.S. they sell it in 3.3 lb. cans and plastic milk jugs), and you can substitute a 1.5 kg can of Coopers Light Malt Extract or the Premium ...


2

Pick a style of beer that is balanced more toward malt than hops -- a highly hopped IPA is going to hide a lot of the malt flavor. Something like an ordinary or special Bitter, Scottish ales, blond ale, or many of the lagers will give much more malt flavor. American Ale yeast (Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001) tend to be very neutral, as do some of the ...


2

Brewing is a lot like cooking. You can't often try ingredients in isolation - you wouldn't normally eat pure salt, pepper, chili, vinegar etc... the taste would be far more potent than it would normally be. But combined with some other ingredients (meat, fish, tomatoes etc..), they become wonderful with something else to play off. The same is true with ...


2

Pilsner malt is known for having a grainy flavor. Try switching to American 2-Row.


2

I generally agree with most of the recommendations, but I would shy away from a lot of the hops choices, especially Fuggles. It has an earthy, woody flavor that could conflict. I'd recommend a small bittering addition using a very neutral hop like Magnum with no other hops. Also, if you just want to learn the flavor of grains, it's easy to make a tea with ...


2

I would doubt it - the mill is made of steel, which I imagine is orders of magnitude more robust than any cereal you put through it. But if in doubt contact the manufacturer to be sure.


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