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9

Your high efficiency is due to using a lot more water than you need, washing every last bit of sugar out of the mash. Ultimately, you want to collect less wort. This will result in a lower efficiency. As such, you'll need to use more grain to account for the lower efficiency. If you had 22L at 17°Bx, then you started with 35L at 10°Bx with 90% efficiency. ...


7

It's an activity and the initial part of the sparge. Definition from BYO. "At the start of the lautering process, you should use a quart container to catch the first runnings. These will be cloudy and have bits of husk in them. Pour the cloudy, husky material back into the top of the lauter. This process is called vorlauf, a German word that means ...


6

Cons I can think of: As the gravity of the run-off from the mash decreases, the pH increases (towards the pH of the sparge water) and with it the chances of leaching astringent-tasting polyphenol compounds (tannins) from the grain, especially at high temperatures (>176°F). If you're after every last bit of sugar, you could possibly do more harm than good by ...


6

I have done a couple of batches of about one gallon. (I targeted twelve 12-oz. bottles, which requires a little more than a gallon into the fermenter.) Small batches are generally much simpler than five-gallon or larger batches because they require less equipment and can be done on the kitchen stove. They also require less time so a mid-week brew day is ...


5

I'm going to assume you're basically doing "batch sparging" (adding the sparge liquor in batches due to capacity), not that you're "step mashing" (using hot water infusions to move the whole mash through a set of different temperature "steps"). Once the enzymes are denatured, they are … denatured. :) They will not return or restart their ability to convert ...


5

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


4

I just let it boil down for about 1 - 2 hours before I began my hop additions. [...] but what is the normal method for correcting an under-shot pre-boil gravity? Boiling for 1.5-2 hours is quite common. It sounds like the advice you got from Beersmith was correct. Your pre-boil volume is usually about 1.2-1.5 times your expected volume into the ...


4

If your pre-boil gravity is low you can goose it with some DME or whatever fermentable sugar you prefer. As to the issues with beersmith, its hard really to know without the recipe so when you have that throw it up and we can examine it more.


4

I use second runnings / Parti-Gyle as often as I can. But as my primary mash efficiency rises theres less and less usefulness in the parti-gyle. As for me using the grains, it's compost or given away for chicken feed. If your mash efficiency is still below 85% there's still plenty use in the parti-gyle. I could usually get 5 gallons of 1.025-1.030 parti-...


4

Water chemistry, particularly mash pH, can have a large effect on efficiency. My first step would be to check the pH of the mash and make sure you're in the 5.2-5.8 range (ideally closer to the low end of that range). It's also important to measure volume correctly, have you calibrated whatever you use to measure out water?


4

Forget about the mash timer. A mash is done when there's no more starch. The finer the grain crush, the more mash efficiency you will get. Up until it's so fine that it gets stuck. Finding that balance on a system is usually trial and error. Though in your case you may find other robobrew users and follow thier suggestions. Yes pH and water chemistry play ...


3

1.5 gallon batch? You should fine. The higher grain to water ratio may result in a slightly high pH but you should still be well in the range for enzymes to do their work.


3

A good crush should keep the grain husks intact, since they will then filter out the flour and provide an efficient lauter. I also crush reasonably finely, which does produce some flour, but as long as the husks are intact you're good. I have a 3 roller mill - the sales pitch was that it doesn't pulverize the husks as much as a 2 roller. I've not used a 2 ...


3

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First is stuck filtering. If your malt is dripping wet, but nothing comes from the filter, this is the case. See Preventing a Stuck Sparge for details how to deal with ...


3

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of 0.96*(weight of grain). The 0.96 is a ratio, so if you use kg of grain, for every 1 kg of grain, you will lose 0.96 kg of water (~960 mL). If you use pounds, 1 ...


3

Just treat it like any other mash tun. Before you pull that thing out of the kettle start drawing off wort through the valve at the base (at least it looks like a valve in the picture). Collect it in a pitcher that you can easily pour from. Then slowly pour in back in at the top of the cylinder. Do this repeatedly until you think the wort looks clear ...


3

We sparge because we're interested in dissolving more of the sugars from the grain into solution. There are some physical principles when dissolving, like: A more concentrated sugar solution dissolves sugar more slowly than a weak solution. Hot water dissolves sugar more quickly than cooler water. Sugar only dissolves if it's in contact with the water. To ...


2

It sounds like it's the crush. Get some feeler gauges and measure the distance. Typical distance is 0.038 to 0.042 inches.


2

Copying most of my answer from https://homebrew.stackexchange.com/a/12575/3925 I've adapted my technique for BIAB over a few batches. These steps are my version of merging BIAB with all-grain and sparging. I've used this technique with all-grain recipies, and associated water temperatures for mash and sparge, and it turns out great. I got some buckets from ...


2

Quick Version I don't know about the flavour. As long as you are using it with a base malt you can use up to ~50%, you don't need to get malted triticale or pre-cook it(see below). Also, I have no idea where you could find some in the UK; if you can find some flaked then try that. PS: if you know where to find some please post a link here, because I am ...


2

Efficient use of materials is certainly a problem if you only take the first runnings and do not sparge, but it's not as much of a problem if you practice partigyle brewing. Partigyle used to be a common practice in many breweries to brew separate beers with the first, second, and, occasionally, third runnings from the mash. This might be very cost effective ...


2

I have two very rough guesses. First, are there any points where you are boiling uncovered where you could change and cover the pot? Second, your boiler is 52l? Given how large that is I expect you're producing a lot of steam in the boiler due to its increased surface area. Try skipping the boiler, sparge back into your HLT instead of the boiler. Having ...


2

Wow! That is economical brewing - but possibly too economical. There may be some colour and flavour left in the roast grains but there should be very little starch, malto-dextrins or sugars left in the malted grains. However there is a lot of grain husk left behind and that is a source of tannins and lignins that impart a bitter or more astringent taste to ...


2

I would avoid option 3. You've already got plenty of Munich in the recipe, and it would likely alter the flavor too much. If you do go this way be sure to use your lightest Munich as the higher roasted Munich will lose its enzymes and no longer be suitable as a base malt. My choice would be to use more extract, preferably LME. It's easy and effective. You ...


2

IMO, the best use of spent grain is for food. I made an amazing bran cake from the spent grain from a red ale. Not only are the grains. Spent grain has residual sugars that add a sweetness that improves a lot of foods. You can use them in pancakes, cakes, muffins, and you can even make granola with it. Once you are done mashing/steeping, place your spent ...


2

The bad news is that you can't detect channeling while you are fly sparging... but you can see it afterwards. This works best in darker beers. After the mash get something to scoop out the spent grain. A stainless steel mixing bowl worked pretty well for me. Scoop out a bit of the grain, then look at what's in the bowl and what's left in the mash tun. Look ...


2

I don't think you'll notice any difference in beer by throttling back. On my RIMS I get the strike water up to temp in the mash tun first, stop the pump completely, dough in, then restart the pump. This has the benefit of getting all the equipment preheated.


1

For the mash liquor, you could do the strike-temp heating in the mash tun through the RIMS tube before adding grains, and then RIMS to hold/change temp. The sparge liquor is going to be a problem, though; without a second vessel, you'd need to add cold sparge liquor, then RIMS-heat it up to sparge temp, which probably isn't going to do great things for the ...


1

I started homebrewing with a 1 gallon kit, and I've done several all grain batches with it. For scaling down a five gallon recipe, you are correct in just dividing everything by five. However, specialty grains and hops that are only small quantities and the five gallon recipe may not come through as strong in the one gallon batch, so you may need more than ...


1

There is the risk of tannin extraction when the mash pH rises above 5.8. High temperatures exacerbate the problem. My guess is if you just add cool water, stir, and drain then the low temperature and short contact time will minimize the risk.


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