19

I have been brewing 1-gallon batches at home, and 5-gallon batches at a friend's house, so I have some knowledge on this point. To me, these are the pros and cons with small batches: Pros: My spaghetti pot is large enough to do a full boil. It takes very little room, all of my equipment stores in a small plastic bin, and I can easily ferment anywhere in my ...


5

You do have the answer in your question. When brewing my first kit, I put the sugar in each bottle and here is my experience: Have to measure sugar for each bottle, difficult and time consuming when using different sizes. I did experience gushing when filling bottles that had sugar in them I did get a few bottles that where not as good (due to sugar not ...


4

AJ deLange calculated that 4.7mg/L (~18mg/gl) of potassium metabisulfite (4.0mg/L of sodium metabisulfite) is needed to reduce a "worst case" scenario of 3mg/L of chloramine. (PDF, via the Wayback Machine archive of AJ's site). I've been using this to add K-meta along with my brewing salts. That works out to 188mg for 10gl of brewing liquor. A Campden ...


4

To answer your question it is important that you first understand what it is that the yeast is actually doing whilst in the "fermentation stage". After you have added your yeast to your batch it will begin with a so called lag phase. This is mainly the yeast getting climatised with the new environment. In this phase the yeast also start to take up minerals ...


4

After only a few days in primary, there's almost certainly enough yeast suspended in the beer to ferment the sugars in the fruit. There are a couple exceptions to this rule: Very high gravity beers. The high alcohol levels in the finished beer are toxic to yeast. Beers that have aged for many months. Most of the yeast will have precipitated ot. In these ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


4

I have done this with a 10 liter (2.5 gal) stock pot in my kitchen sink when I started brewing, also batches from 1 to 1.5 gallon. I did two things. In the first step I cooled by letting water flow from the faucet on the outside area of the pot. I do have a detachable faucet which does make this easier. In the second step, after sufficiently cooling (to ...


4

Because you are brewing a small batch, I think that an ice bath will be quite sufficient, however you muct add more ice at regular intervals. I also suggest adding salt to your ice so that the melting point of the ice is raised. Keep a lot of ice at your service and remember to stir!


3

It is absolutely fine, bit of extra head space isn't going to cause any harm, or give any magical benefits. Just means you'll have less beer.


3

1.5 gallon batch? You should fine. The higher grain to water ratio may result in a slightly high pH but you should still be well in the range for enzymes to do their work.


3

Not, unless you set up a custom temp control for the oven. Most ovens start at 200°F which is much higher than any mash temp. Putting in a warm oven with it off could be done easily with a manual thermometer. Just turn it off when it gets to mash temp and it should hold the heat nicely.


3

First I would stick with 5 gallon equipment and brew half sized batches. Barrel half and bottle the other half. Then you have side by side comparators. I don't think worrying about angel's share is a concern. With such a small barrel the surface contact to volume ratio is going to be huge. The first few batches will likely develop huge oak flavors very ...


3

It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...


3

Corn sugar is a monosaccharide where cane sugar is a disaccharide. Both are entirely fermentable but the disaccharide must be cleaved first. If your yeast are stressed they'll have a easier time with the monosaccharide. Corn sugar monosaccharide is usually glucose. There is some evidence that glucose fermentations produce higher ester levels. All things ...


3

In short corn sugar is more similar to the sugars in the wort so it's easy for the yeast to consume both. Other sugars are harder or easier for the yeast to consume and come with their own issues. Typically corn sugar is preferred. As adjuct and priming sugar.


2

Check that your glass is totally clean and free from oils and detergent. I doubt the beer lost it's head because of overcarbonation (and I don't think you've overcarbonated.) Even if you did, wheat beers tend to be served with medium-high to high levels of carbonation. The head stability is produced from proteins and hop acids. Looking at the recipe in the ...


2

Denaturing any enzymes takes some time...at least 20 min. If you don't go over 162, you should be OK in terms of having enough beta left. The majority of the conversion will be done in the first half hour or so, but as long as you're still in the 145+ range, long chain dextrins will continue to be broken down into shorter ones. It's based on the entire ...


2

Most homebrew supply shops sell a two-gallon bucket, which is ideal for one-gallon batches. Midwest Supplies currently includes a drilled lid with grommet for the same price as other HBS charge for just the bucket. But I found that their silk-screened volume markings are sometimes off, so check them yourself. For anything larger than one-gallon, I use a 4-...


2

It's not a problem. Runs the risk of oxygen exposure to finished beer if not filled properly, but It can be done at the cost of co2, which is very minimal. Personally, I purge starsan from the keg using co2 and fill the corney from the outlet port, so there is no air exposure regaurdless of how much beer im putting in. You will force carb more quickly. If ...


2

I wouldn't bother getting smaller equipment. Assuming you brew 5 gallon batches, why not just ferment your beer as usual, then move 1.3 gallons into the barrel, and bottle the remaining 3.7 gallons? I have a small 1L barrel filled with rum. Over the last 6th months, I've lost about 1/2 of it (due to seepage, not evaporation). My barrel is physically leaking. ...


2

Ultimately, the answer to that question is going to depend on what you want the final alcohol content to be. According to the wikipedia article on Kilju, the typical alcohol content is 5-7%. As you probably know, you can calculate the alcohol level using an alcohol hydrometer by measuring a before and after fermentation reading. Using this calculator, I ...


2

There are a bunch of mash water:grain ratios, but generally around 1.5:1 qt./lb. (that's about 1.5 litres per 500 grams). The software BeerSmith recommends batch sparging your recipe with 4.1 and then 7.1 litres of water. So (assuming you're batch sparging) the first sparge-water addition would be 4.1 litres, and the second 7.1 litres. if you're ...


2

I do this with some of my five gallon batches. I have a rather big deep sink. I buy a couple of bags of ice and put the whole pot in there and fill with ice and water. It cools down quickly enough. Works fine if you don't have access to a wort chiller. I have seen people in northern climates put their hot wort in the snow. Works well in Canada in the middle ...


2

The first problem is that the Mangrove Jack's Empire Ale yeast has an alcohol tolerance of only 8%. Using some beer recipe software, the amount of malt you used would lead to an alcohol percentage of 15%. Which means that your yeast will stop halfway the fermentation. Second, the amount of hops is not matched to the original gravity obtained by using 6kg ...


1

You just had very poor mash efficiency. All the causes and solutions have been covered in other Q&A here. When done correctly you should be able to easily produce 10l of 1.096 wort post boil and dilute to 20l for 1.046 Update: Ran some of your numbers. DP fine, water/grist ratio fine. Looks like you actually got ok mash efficiency but saccharification ...


1

Here are a few recipes that you can look at for help: http://beersmithrecipes.com/searchrecipe?uid=&term=Weizen&submit.x=13&submit.y=9&sort=Best+Match&allgrain=1&rated=4


1

My initial thought was that you should get a smaller vessel, but thinking it through likely the CO2 would drive out any excess oxygen or the yeast would consume it. I think you should be OK. I would personally get a second smaller fermenter as it allows you to make a small and a large batch in parallel, which isn't a bad thing :-)


1

I use a small hydrometer (17cm in length) and a 50ml test tube. I rarely need more than 40ml to take a reading, so four readings would require, in total, less than 5% of you wort.


1

I find a refractometer works great for OG, and a finishing hydrometer works best for final gravity (with presence of alcohol). I typically drink the sample, as I am mostly curious as to how the flavor is shaping up, especially once FG has settled (to gauge bulk-aging or conditioning impact on flavor). However, I have some sours that I sometimes return the ...


1

The technique may work, and in theory, provided good process handling, shouldn't pose any issues. Something to consider though is that grain contains on it many organisms, including lactobacillus and enterobacter. Without boiling neither of the organisms will be killed, and will also have been given time to grow in the wort during the mash. How well they ...


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