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19

A while ago I visited a local meadery and chatted with the brewer (meader?). He was planning on making use of a local micro-distiller's equipment to produce a spirit from his mead. I asked him the name of the resulting product, and his answer was "distilled mead". Not the answer I was hoping for. I've never tasted such a thing and suspect that the subtle ...


12

According to Wikipedia there doesn't appear to be much in the way of a family name for it: Mead (Wikipedia). I think the closest would be "Midus" Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate or mead nectar,...


8

I eventually got around to it, kept it very simple: Recipe: 3.5L water 0.667 kg "Organic raw blue" agave nectar (I was looking for "dark" for a stronger flavour, but they didn't have any) Bring the water to a boil, and leave it there about 20 minutes to sterilize it. Let water cool to about 40-45C (the label on the agave nectar bottle suggested that the ...


8

I once heard a name for this called "drakas"(spelling). As told it was a Norse drink made by placing a bowl of honey mead outside overnight. In the morning, chip off the ice and repeat a few times untill a thick drink was the result.


7

Pure sugar is the most fermentable substance, at 1.046 points per pound per gallon. With 12 pounds of sugar in 3 gallons, you'd expect a OG of 1.183. Honey has an estimated yield of 35 ppg, and correspondingly the gravity would be lower - 1.135. There could be 3 possibilities for the observed high gravity the stratification is causing the reading to be off....


7

An extended soak of your brew bucket with warm cleanser and/or bleach or baking soda will help clear up your bucket post this ferment. Its not something to worry about IMO. My old buckets have definite stains from years of use but I've never had carry over flavor issues. Its usually too dilute compared to the flavors of the next ferment.


7

Assuming that all of the proceeding is accurate, would it not just be a "honey brandy"? I can imagine a very sweet flavor with an interesting aroma and probably fairly drinkable if not pleasant flavor. I know that mead was popular in Egypt, Turkey, etc. since the dawn of civilization and you can't be the first person in human history to think of this so I ...


6

It most certainly is a function of your fermentation profile. Reviewing your temperatures and the amount of yeast you pitch makes a difference. Mead is also a fairly poor nutrient substrate for yeast. The very best mead makers preach about staggered nutrient additions while also degassing the CO2 from the must during the early part of fermentation. ...


6

Here is a link to a document written by Steve Piatz who was the AHA mead maker of the year a few years ago. The method is often referred to as the staggered nutrient addition method. The types of nutrients typically used are Yeast Energizer which contains diammonium phosphate(DAP) and fermaid K or Nutriferm Advance which are similar nutrient blends. The ...


6

I have my own family recipe that I have recently cooked off made from clover honey. We have always called it honeydew whiskey even though it does not meet description standards of whiskey. Its what I have heard several old timers call it


6

Aguardente de mel is what we call it in portuguese... Literal translation to english is Honey's burning water


6

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


6

There is a difference between new and use whiskey barrels. The reason that many homebrewers use used whiskey barrels is that a lot of the color from the charred wood inside the barrel has been taken out by the whiskey that was in there before. The other reason is that after soaking in whiskey, the inside is fairly sterile. All that booze kills the bad stuff ...


6

If you are making mead solely from Honey, Water, Yeast, then you will not need to add anything else. No pectic enzyme required!


6

Hibiscus contains hydroxycitric acid. I suspect it had a reaction to metal elements in the yeast nutrient. The product looks like iron chloride in solution to me.


5

I'd use a degasser, just like for wine. Also works great to aerate beer...


5

It depends somewhat on what flavors you are looking for and how long you want to wait, post-fermentation, to drink it. Warmer fermentation is going to produce more fruity esters from the yeast, but they also produce more complex (hot) alcohols. Primary fermentation will finish relatively quickly, but the mead is going to have to sit in secondary for ...


5

you can boil half a sachet of yeast and add that to the must. It provides many of the trace elements needed by the yeast, but I'm not sure how much nitrogen it provides, which is the key nutrient required in mead. If the mead is not very strong, you can in fact successfully ferment without nutrient, just pitch 50% extra yeast.


5

Also keep in mind that mead long predates yeast nutrients. The old Greek formula went something like: Put three parts water and one part honey in an amphora in the sun for a few days. Enjoy. That must have been some sweet, syrupy mead. However, the point is that if you can't get the yeast nutrients, you can always try brewing mead without them. FWIW I ...


5

Not sure if this an answer, but why not make a ginger extract and add post-fermentation to taste? You essentially have two possible methods, the first being preferable: 1.) Make a tincture with the ginger. Chop it or puree it finely, then add vodka or grain alcohol, cover and rest for one week, put through a strainer, and add the homemade extract in ...


5

Contamination('infection') will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. ...


5

1: I year is good. 5 years can often be better! 2: Yes, rack before ageing/conditioning. Once is enough, just to take the young mead off the precipitated yeast. 3: No 4: Neither is possibly better. But you are the brewer and can adjust as you prefer. 5 No. Pasteurising is probably a bad move. Adding chemicals can be done - but why? Mead is usually ...


5

Yes the head space is important. At the very least, you need the head space to cushion fluid volume expansion & contraction from temp change.


5

IMHO mead does not generally need any adjustment of pH levels to ferment correctly. It is generally fermented to have a similar level of alcohol to a strong wine - which will not generally support bacterial growth. As the fermentation progresses the pH of the mead will naturally drop due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Mead has been made this way for a long ...


5

Ginger has its own microbes that will change fermentation. You will want to kill if you just want ginger flavor and aroma. I would suggest making a ginger slurry then pastureize it by bringing it to about 200°F (90°C) for about 3 minutes. Cool it in a sanitary way (cover / seal). Then add this slurry late fermentation when most of your alcohol is present.


5

Dry yeast packets are generally enough for 3-6 gallons. So with 1 gallon, about 1/4 of one pack is plenty for a commercial dried yeast such as Danstar Lallemand Nottingham Ale yeast. And you most definitely would not need 2 packs! Even 1 whole pack is a major over-pitch.


5

You may not have a perfect seal, so the gas is dissipating into the atmosphere. This is not a problem. The airlock serves only as a safety mechanism - it prevents buildup of gas, while also preventing anything getting into the container. An airlock is one of many ways to achieve this. You can put a bit of aluminium foil over the lid, a teatowel, anything ...


5

Since it's on secondary, contamination risk is low, but for contaminants that have contact with the drink from now on. If the hair is there since the beginning of the fermentation, any possible contamination has already happened. Either way, it's better to remove the hair than to leave it there. Minor lighting shouldn't be a problem, sanitation is much more ...


4

Most of mine have had a solventy or phenolic twang when they're young. Somewhere around a year, that finally ages out, and they taste much more pleasant after that.


4

I was going to point out that organisms that produce endospores, like Clostridium botulinum survive in honey, but then I remembered that you can not kill them by boiling. The spores could also be naturally present in anything you brew or preserve. This is why you should use a pressure cooker for canning non-acidic foods. I did a bit more research, and found ...


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