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19

A while ago I visited a local meadery and chatted with the brewer (meader?). He was planning on making use of a local micro-distiller's equipment to produce a spirit from his mead. I asked him the name of the resulting product, and his answer was "distilled mead". Not the answer I was hoping for. I've never tasted such a thing and suspect that the subtle ...


12

According to Wikipedia there doesn't appear to be much in the way of a family name for it: Mead (Wikipedia). I think the closest would be "Midus" Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate or mead nectar,...


8

I once heard a name for this called "drakas"(spelling). As told it was a Norse drink made by placing a bowl of honey mead outside overnight. In the morning, chip off the ice and repeat a few times untill a thick drink was the result.


7

Assuming that all of the proceeding is accurate, would it not just be a "honey brandy"? I can imagine a very sweet flavor with an interesting aroma and probably fairly drinkable if not pleasant flavor. I know that mead was popular in Egypt, Turkey, etc. since the dawn of civilization and you can't be the first person in human history to think of this so I ...


6

I have my own family recipe that I have recently cooked off made from clover honey. We have always called it honeydew whiskey even though it does not meet description standards of whiskey. Its what I have heard several old timers call it


6

Aguardente de mel is what we call it in portuguese... Literal translation to english is Honey's burning water


6

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


6

There is a difference between new and use whiskey barrels. The reason that many homebrewers use used whiskey barrels is that a lot of the color from the charred wood inside the barrel has been taken out by the whiskey that was in there before. The other reason is that after soaking in whiskey, the inside is fairly sterile. All that booze kills the bad stuff ...


6

If you are making mead solely from Honey, Water, Yeast, then you will not need to add anything else. No pectic enzyme required!


6

Hibiscus contains hydroxycitric acid. I suspect it had a reaction to metal elements in the yeast nutrient. The product looks like iron chloride in solution to me.


6

Since it's on secondary, contamination risk is low, but for contaminants that have contact with the drink from now on. If the hair is there since the beginning of the fermentation, any possible contamination has already happened. Either way, it's better to remove the hair than to leave it there. Minor lighting shouldn't be a problem, sanitation is much more ...


6

It isn't too much of a big deal. If you have the nutritional information from the honey you can calculate how much of it was pure sugar (mainly glucose in honey I believe). Then it is a simple case of using an online calculator to to calculate an estimated SG for your recipe. If precision means slightly less you could simply use the preloaded 'honey' option ...


5

Also keep in mind that mead long predates yeast nutrients. The old Greek formula went something like: Put three parts water and one part honey in an amphora in the sun for a few days. Enjoy. That must have been some sweet, syrupy mead. However, the point is that if you can't get the yeast nutrients, you can always try brewing mead without them. FWIW I ...


5

Honey is aseptic. The water content is too low for microorganisms to develop, so there is no need to pasteurize or use campden. Campden is used in winemaking to eliminate the wild yeasts which exist on grape skins, this helps ensure a more consistent product by eliminating the variation introduced by wild yeasts. None of this is necessary with mead and in ...


5

Not sure if this an answer, but why not make a ginger extract and add post-fermentation to taste? You essentially have two possible methods, the first being preferable: 1.) Make a tincture with the ginger. Chop it or puree it finely, then add vodka or grain alcohol, cover and rest for one week, put through a strainer, and add the homemade extract in ...


5

Contamination('infection') will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. ...


5

1: I year is good. 5 years can often be better! 2: Yes, rack before ageing/conditioning. Once is enough, just to take the young mead off the precipitated yeast. 3: No 4: Neither is possibly better. But you are the brewer and can adjust as you prefer. 5 No. Pasteurising is probably a bad move. Adding chemicals can be done - but why? Mead is usually ...


5

Yes the head space is important. At the very least, you need the head space to cushion fluid volume expansion & contraction from temp change.


5

I'm not quite an expert on beer making, but I have made honey ales a few times and was a beekeeper for about 8 years, so I have some honey knowledge. The crystallized honey is no different from normal honey. You can decrystallize it by suspending its container in warm water. This should make it a normal honey texture again, and it


5

IMHO mead does not generally need any adjustment of pH levels to ferment correctly. It is generally fermented to have a similar level of alcohol to a strong wine - which will not generally support bacterial growth. As the fermentation progresses the pH of the mead will naturally drop due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Mead has been made this way for a long ...


5

Ginger has its own microbes that will change fermentation. You will want to kill if you just want ginger flavor and aroma. I would suggest making a ginger slurry then pastureize it by bringing it to about 200°F (90°C) for about 3 minutes. Cool it in a sanitary way (cover / seal). Then add this slurry late fermentation when most of your alcohol is present.


5

Dry yeast packets are generally enough for 3-6 gallons. So with 1 gallon, about 1/4 of one pack is plenty for a commercial dried yeast such as Danstar Lallemand Nottingham Ale yeast. And you most definitely would not need 2 packs! Even 1 whole pack is a major over-pitch.


5

You may not have a perfect seal, so the gas is dissipating into the atmosphere. This is not a problem. The airlock serves only as a safety mechanism - it prevents buildup of gas, while also preventing anything getting into the container. An airlock is one of many ways to achieve this. You can put a bit of aluminium foil over the lid, a teatowel, anything ...


4

I was going to point out that organisms that produce endospores, like Clostridium botulinum survive in honey, but then I remembered that you can not kill them by boiling. The spores could also be naturally present in anything you brew or preserve. This is why you should use a pressure cooker for canning non-acidic foods. I did a bit more research, and found ...


4

People will tell you that bugs won't grow in raw honey, and they're right. The bad news is that they're still there and they'll grow just fine when you add water to make the must. (Let's remember people, there are bee parts in this stuff...) If you pitch well with a very large yeast population, it is possible to have a fine ferment and a fine mead because ...


4

It could be from bacterial contamination, old yeast, or from stale ingredients. BJCP page, Mead Faults, lists some typical causes: Vegetal Smell or taste of plants or green vegetables. Cooked, canned or rotten vegetable (cabbage, celery, onion, asparagus, parsnip) aroma and flavor: Encourage a fast, vigorous fermentation (use a healthy, active starter to ...


4

After I made my still, I was anxious to get started distilling. I had a five gallon carboy of strawberry mead that was made to about 15% ABV and was less than a year old,so I used that. It was wonderful right off the still, with flavors from both the strawberries and the honey. I double distilled, using a stripping run and a spirit run. It was good clear, ...


4

There is nothing new. Distilled mead is called "mead balsam", at least in Lithuania, where "midus" (mead) was an ancient drink, later one factory tried to distill it. Please google for such drinks as "Suktinis" or "Zalgiris" (which is 75% strong)...Also see midus.lt In my personal opinion, mead (real matured mead, and the best mead shall be matured at least ...


4

While I personally lean on the side of calling distilled mead a honey brandy, I would agree with most people that commented so far. There is not a clear category in which to fit a honey-sourced distilled alcohol. The average person is likely to view mead as a honey-based wine. But, this is not technically correct since a wine is made from fruit, ...


4

When to add fruit is somewhat subjective and debated, but the general principle is that the later you add, the more fresh-tasting and distinct the fruit character will be. If you want a more sherry-like "aged" fruit character then I would say add early. Personally I prefer the fresh flavor and aroma so I add macerated fruit to secondary. Another ...


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