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9

These are called swing-top bottles, and they're fine for re-use as long as they originally contained a carbonated drink like beer, and the glass has no chips or cracks. The usual advice regarding re-using commercial bottles applies here. First make sure they are clean, and then sanitize them before filling with delicious homebrew. The easiest way to clean ...


6

I just wanted to let you know, in case anyone else could find this useful. Hydrochloric acid alone worked perfectly, the bottle was put into it for less than 20 minutes, and after that it was rinsed with water (almost no rubbing was needed) and everything was removed in less than 10 seconds. NOTES: -The part of paint remaining on the top, was not inside the ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. Inappropriate ...


5

I take it from the title that you added the priming sugar and bottled the beer, then put it in the fridge? If that's the case, you'll probably be OK. Just let the beer come up to room temperature and leave them alone for two weeks. Open one and see if it's carbonated. If it is, job well done. Relax and drink your beer. Otherwise, the yeast was knocked back ...


5

There are two ways to get carbonated beer in bottles: natural conditioning, and force carbonation. Natural conditioning is a process in which a small amount of fermentable sugar is added to the beer at bottling time. The yeast in the beer will ferment the sugar, adding carbon dioxide and a small amount of alcohol. Because the yeast become active to produce ...


5

Soak in StarSan. Mix starsan as you would normally. Submerge bottles and soak for a day or so. Use a stainless steel scrubber (ball of stainless steel for cleaning pots/pans) to scrub off the paint. I've done this on 100's of bottles. It's really effortless with the scrubber. Side note I wouldn't recommend clear bottles for beer or anything hopped. (...


5

Here is a neat article about the Beer clarification process: Clarification of Beer: Advanced Brewing . The article is about beer, but they derive a rough formula estimating it will take about 88 hours for yeast to settle 1 meter in beer. If the the yeast is only disturbed to a height of .1 meters is should take around 8 to 9 hours to settle. Cider is less ...


5

Depends on how well settled the sediment is to begin with. The key is to keep the bottles upright so that the surface of the liquid remains in the confined space in the neck. Assuming normal flat roadways, you should be fine. How long it will take for the bottles to settle back down if they do get stirred up is subject to how stirred up they get and how ...


5

Bacteria like to hang out in soft surfaces like rubber and plastic, which for us usually includes things like buckets, hoses, and o-rings. Also any metal fittings for your valves, etc. Glass bottles have none of these problems. You can safely clean and sanitize your bottles and reuse them for any kind of beer. If you are very concerned, the best way to ...


3

You won't be introducing that much oxygen by opening the fermentation bucket to simply take a gravity sample, unless you go stirring it up or something.


3

You're doing something wrong. I've broken exactly one 22 oz bottle in 10 years of homebrewing, probably due to overcarbonation, not opening mechanical stress. (Also, if I broke glass anywhere near liquid, I would toss it all categorically. I can not fathom how you think opening a 12oz bottle of beer that splinters "everywhere" does not get "in the brew". ...


3

To build on what tobias said: In both scenarios, if the beer is not crystal clear before bottling, the amount sediment in the bottles will be greater. You can reduce, but not eliminate, sediment in naturally conditioned beer by ensuring the beer is clear before bottling. The more sediment you start with, the more you will end up with. There are several ...


3

It could be that there was an insufficient amount of active yeast in the beer when you bottled it. You could try this: Uncap each bottle Add two or three grains of dry yeast Recap the bottles Keep somewhere warm for a week or two. The other possibility is that the alcohol percentage in the beer is high enough to kill any yeast. If the beer is above 10% ...


3

You should be fine. The results are really to lager strain dependent. That said, I have made several lagers that were great and ready to drink without a true lager phase. (Not to say they didn't get better as things went alone in the kegorator.) You should really let your palate be your guide. If it tastes great but the process didn't go along according ...


2

I can suggest a small Zebra printer. There are many models that can print on removable labels of 1" up to 4" wide. It usually comes with a software that allows you to design a label and print as many as you want (a roll will contain about 800 labels). The price would vary depending on the model (for about 200$ to 400$ you should get a good printer). ...


2

For fancy reusable labels you could try Grogtags. With those you design it on their website then they print and ship to you. Not a label maker, but its the only thing I could think of that's like what you described. Most at home labelers are paper based.


2

You can also try storing the bottles upside down for a week or two. I have had great success with this in the past. I assume it has something to do with the smaller area for the yeast and sugar to settle. One side note, once carbonated you'll need to turn them back over to resettle or you'll have the yeast ring around the bottle mouth.


2

First, it's unnecessary, as you concluded, to do both of those things. Each individual step (dunk in sanitizing solution OR running through the dishwasher, sans detergent) effectively sanitizes the bottle, one by chemical, the other by heat. Sure, doing both is technically an extra-safe and cautious move, but pointless in my opinion. Neither is sterilizing, ...


2

During secondary fermentation (bottling stage, aka 2F) of kombucha brewing, there is a correlation between sugar as an input and carbonation as an output. If you increase the sugar in the 2F ingredients, carbonation will increase. If you're getting too much carbonation during 2F, you can do one or both of the following. Burp the bottles throughout the 2F ...


2

The advice given to me by a professional cider brewer was to put the fruit flavouring in at the last possible moment i.e. At bottling. Use natural fruit pressed and filtered. I have put a small amount i.e. About a teaspoon of fruit pulp to 1ltr still cider and that is sufficient for a very nice blackberry blush which doesn't overpower the cider and isn't too ...


2

Are you making still cider or sparkling cider? If you are making sparkling cider than your plan should work since the amount of sugar is negligible. If you are making still cider, you might get a slight effervesce if anything at all. What I suggest is to add some ginger to the cider now as chunks or something like that and let it age for a couple of weeks to ...


2

Looks like pellicle from some organism. Probably a wild yeast or a souring bacteria. It shouldn't be harmful, but can sure ruin a beer. You got a lot of headspace there and oxygen for things to grow. I would seperate the infected ones and secure for bottle bombs if you plan on keeping them.


2

IMHO the yeast is not dead but might be dormant. As has been asked in the comments above - there is no mention of priming sugar added to the brew before (or while) bottling. If the fermentation went to completion in the barrel then some priming sugar/malt will be needed to carbonate the beer in the bottle. If there was no sugar then there would be no ...


1

I make bottle conditioned beers all the time and have never (touch wood) had a problem with them clouding up during transportation. Unless you are hauling the over dirt tracks in the back of a truck you should have no problems.


1

What you're describing is a "gusher infection", wild yeast that can consume normally unfermentable sugars like dextrins. Usually leaves a beverage with little body and other issues. In beer after the cap pops a gusher will just usually slowly volcano, taking most the beer with it as foam. Some can over carb so much to vacate the bottle almost ...


1

Generally speaking, temperature-related off-flavors in beer get produced in the first three or four days of fermentation. It is fairly common for homebrewers to ramp up the temperatures of lagers to 22C or so after the first week or two of fermentation to reduce diacetyl, and to speed the remainder of fermentation. The bottom line is, never dump a beer ...


1

I accidentally did this the first time I brewed. My beer turned out just fine. It took longer for the carbonation to take than it did without putting it in the fridge.


1

I highly doubt that immediately refrigerating your bottled beer (which was already fermented) damaged it at all. Cold temperatures "shock" yeast, basically making it inactive. So, the bottles probably have not yet carbonated (which is when the yeast eats the priming sugar). Just take them out of the fridge, put them in a room somewhere, and within a few ...


1

Homebrewers typically use 5g Stainless Steel Cornelius kegs to store beer in. A lot of homebrew stores carry them, they are also known as used Pepsi or Coke kegs. The kegs would have to be pressurized for storing water.


1

You are not capping twist-off-lid bottles are you??? If you are using an old style Hammer Capper for your caps it could maybe damage your glass if your bit too heavy handed. Buy/try a lever capper. Have you tried using a different bottle opener style. I had experience of bar that chipped the majority of the glass bottle from a wall mounted opener, I soon ...


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