9

It should work fine for sanitation, as long as the bottles have been cleaned in advance. If you were planning on using some star-san later though, why bother with the boiling water (or even the bleach in previous runs)? There really is no reason to sanitize twice like that. Clean the bottles well and let them sit until ready to use. Before bottling dunk ...


9

TL; DR; You need to clean! You do this for safety, repeatability, and to avoid wasting your effort. I have cleaned poorly before and wasted brews of both wine and beer, since I took a more rigorous approach I have only had 1 contaminated brew in 13 years, and that was using kit and sanitiser that were not my own. Even if you are making a wild brew you need ...


7

You don't need to do 90% of that. Surfaces need to be clean of matter before they can be sanitized. Things that are visibly dirty should be cleaned, but you don't need to – for example – scrub and soak your brew kettle before you use it … anything you add to it is going to be boiled, which will kill everything. The same goes for your rinsing bowl and ...


7

PBW should be completely safe and effective, at recommended concentrations, for cleaning those. I think the reason you're seeing fading of the gold is that the contact time is too long. Next time a 5 or 10 minute soak, followed by some light scrubbing if necessary, should work just fine. With basically all chemical cleaners the important factors that ...


7

The issue with this kind of faucet is that the seal is at the rear of the assembly (see 10 below). After dispensing, everything post-seal (pretty much all of 9, parts of 6, and the inside of the tap body) will be coated in beer. Being open to the air this will soon dry out and gum up the works. Best solution is to flush out the inside of the tap with ...


5

Have you tried using a percarbonate-based cleaner first? Usually an Oxyclean or PBW solution will break up the gunk in my tubing with a few hours of soaking.


5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed ...


5

I would advise popping it out and cleaning it every time, cleanliness is next to godliness or at least next to not having contaminated beer.


5

Absolutely! I rinse after use then throw them in with my laundry whites. Couple tips. These don't have to be sterile or even sanitized. A good rinse is really the only functional need they have. If washing with laundry. Use fragrance free detergent with an extra rinse cycle. I just use oxyclean. Makes them soft and bright again. Air / line dry them. Don'...


5

The other advice looks good so far. Having a generally clean work space and equipment is very important, and the fully sanitizing equipment only really matters for things that will come in contact with the wort post-boil. To answer one of your other questions, yes if any equipment that needs to be sanitized does contact anything else that is not sanitized, ...


5

All humor aside it should clean easily with mild soap and water. I've found that dish soap 1:20 ratio in a spray bottle does well on latex paint for all kinds of mishaps. Don't use soaps with bleach. Test a small area for discoloring, but allow to dry before you decide. My paint does change color when wet but returns to normal once dry. Spray and let soak ...


5

No, it doesn't. Bentonite is a clarifying agent, similar to Gelatin. It helps settle the yeast and other haze causing elements, but it does not kill the yeast. Sulfites don't actually kill yeast unless you put a lot into your wine. The legal limit is 350ppm, but your wine would probably taste pretty bad at those levels.


5

Bacteria like to hang out in soft surfaces like rubber and plastic, which for us usually includes things like buckets, hoses, and o-rings. Also any metal fittings for your valves, etc. Glass bottles have none of these problems. You can safely clean and sanitize your bottles and reuse them for any kind of beer. If you are very concerned, the best way to ...


4

I've had 5-6 cats and 2 dogs for the entire 16 years I've been homebrewing. They are no bigger threat to your beer than you yourself are. Use StarSan in a spray bottle to clean things, not toxic cleaners like 409 and Windex.


4

This page from the Celiac Disease Foundation may be helpful; scroll down to Cross Contamination. I doubt you will have any issues with metal or glass vessels or tools (especially if they are properly cleaned), but porous items may be suspect? It sounds like the note about airborne wheat flour may be the biggest issue (depending on if you are doing another ...


4

You should probably just rack to a second sanitary bucket, especially if you plan to add additional sugar to the cider for carbonation. Ideally, you use a separate bucket with a spigot to which you can then attach a "bottling wand". This allows you to fill the bottle from the bottom upwards, which significantly reduces the amount of oxygen that is absorbed ...


4

As long as you do not begin abrasive scrubbing until the PBW crystals are dissolved, PBW should not be a problem. Let me differentiate between HDPE plastic bucket fermenters and PET carboys (like Better Bottle). I find that I don't need anything other than hot tap water, a soft sponge, and a slight amount of elbow grease to clean HDPE bucket fermenters. ...


4

Yes, if it can be taken apart and reassembled without damaging it. I would disassemble clean and store. Then sanitize and reassemble the valve and sanitize the bucket as a whole before use. A clean sanitary fermenter and it's parts is critical. This is where your wort is most vulnerable to infection. Line brushes are useful if the valve doesn't come apart....


4

Sodium percarbonate forms hydrogen peroxide which eventually breaks down into oxygen and water. 1a. I think you'd have to leave a lot in. Apparently hydrogen peroxide is used as an antiseptic mouthwash so it must be acceptable to ingest a small amount. 1b. I've read that not rinsing "oxy" type cleaners means oxygen can be created in beer, which can result ...


3

If it's gone hard, it just means that it's picked up moisture from the air. If you can break off the required amount and it dissolves in water, then it will still be effective.


3

I take a sponge and cut a 1.5 inch long and width is approximately the ID of my hose. I stuff this into my hose (wet it first) then stick it in my faucet and let the water pressure push the sponge through the hose. Do this a couple times and any little fragments that may be stuck on inside of the tube come loose. I do it right after I use it before it has ...


3

The technical definitions are as follows: A sanitizing agent removes 99.999% of organisms a sterilization process removes 99.99999999% of organisms. Seems like a small difference but I'd rather have that extra 0.00099999% if they are going to perform surgery or something. Also In the United States, items labeled as sanitizers are agents that destroy 99....


3

If you thoroughly rinse and dry your bottles after use and store them in a dust free place, all you need to do before reusing is sanitize them. The sanitation methods above are good, and you can also soak them for 20 minutes in a bleach solution consisting of two ounces of bleach in five gallons of water. Just be sure to rinse them thoroughly after the soak....


3

John Palmer says that Cleaning Plastics should be done with Percarbonates. A good application of elbow grease also works. :)


3

I get to do more bottle cleaning than I'd prefer these days, here are my favorite cleaners: Percarbonate (oxyclean) + trisodium phosphate (mix at 2:1 ratio, 100g per 20L water). Dissolves label glue and 99% of dried on residues, after a day of soaking. Undiluted (household strength) bleach. Removes all organics in a few minutes. If your deposit is a ...


3

I fill each empty with a 20/80 bleach/water solution and allow to soak for a few hours (usually overnight). Come bottling day, I rinse each bottle with cold water before sanitising. Works like a charm.


3

I have the same bottle rinser as well as those bottles. The neck is indeed too large and you will not be able to directly position the bottle over the rinser as you would a 12 oz glass bottle. However, you will still be able to use these two items together, it is just a bit less convenient. You will need to angle the neck slightly so that the lip of the ...


3

In short, No. Easy clean is not a sanitizer. After cleaning with easy clean, a no rinse sanitizer needs to be used like starsan. I often soak beer equipment for hours in oxyclean, very similar to easy clean. But I rinse after and then sanitize before use. Soaking anything in sanitizer for much longer than it's recomened contact time can be bad for some ...


3

The concept of sanitation itself implies that you have a significant tolerance for undesired microbes, as opposed to sterility where you have to be more careful. If you think that some of your practices are excessive, try removing them one brew at a time. From my experience, I sanitize the equipment once and whenever I am not using the tools I put them ...


3

When I first started, I figured I needed to sanitize the living hell out of everything all throughout the brew process. As I've done more and more recipes without incident, I've realized that one need not be paranoid but simply attentive. Nature is very resilient: those yeast cells you're pitching aren't fragile glass ornaments; they're damn scrappy and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible