22

Well as you asked for 'tips', I've used the following to both dislodge stubborn material from the inside of tubes, and to remove excess water which aids drying: It's a stainless steel brake cable from a bicycle, with a peice of towelling skewered on the end. The one I used was just over 2 meters long. I sterilise the whole thing, and just 'drag' it through ...


13

1) Can I just place my fermentation tank in this tub of water to counter the heat? Yes. This will work to a degree (ha, ha.) The water is slowly but constantly evaporating. The energy need to make liquid water into gas comes out of the water's temperature. This "evaporative cooling" will help cool your wort by a few degrees. 2) Will this method work during ...


12

This method is sometimes referred to as a "swamp cooler", and is well known and used in homebrewing circles. Honestly, if the brew shop employee told you it wouldn't work then they are either (a) trying to sell you a brewing fridge, or (b) not that educated on homebrewing. Change out some ice packs in the water twice a day and you get get down to the low ...


11

For cleaning, if you're able to get all the debris out with water and a cleanser then I wouldn't worry about it. I usually give the stubborn stuff a good soak in warm PBW, then flush with hot water. Worst case scenario, I use a bottle brush or dip tube brush. For drying, the two most common methods are hanging and blowing out with an air compressor. There'...


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


9

It should work fine for sanitation, as long as the bottles have been cleaned in advance. If you were planning on using some star-san later though, why bother with the boiling water (or even the bleach in previous runs)? There really is no reason to sanitize twice like that. Clean the bottles well and let them sit until ready to use. Before bottling dunk ...


9

TL; DR; You need to clean! You do this for safety, repeatability, and to avoid wasting your effort. I have cleaned poorly before and wasted brews of both wine and beer, since I took a more rigorous approach I have only had 1 contaminated brew in 13 years, and that was using kit and sanitiser that were not my own. Even if you are making a wild brew you need ...


7

You don't need to do 90% of that. Surfaces need to be clean of matter before they can be sanitized. Things that are visibly dirty should be cleaned, but you don't need to – for example – scrub and soak your brew kettle before you use it … anything you add to it is going to be boiled, which will kill everything. The same goes for your rinsing bowl and ...


7

PBW should be completely safe and effective, at recommended concentrations, for cleaning those. I think the reason you're seeing fading of the gold is that the contact time is too long. Next time a 5 or 10 minute soak, followed by some light scrubbing if necessary, should work just fine. With basically all chemical cleaners the important factors that ...


7

The issue with this kind of faucet is that the seal is at the rear of the assembly (see 10 below). After dispensing, everything post-seal (pretty much all of 9, parts of 6, and the inside of the tap body) will be coated in beer. Being open to the air this will soon dry out and gum up the works. Best solution is to flush out the inside of the tap with ...


6

I'll try to present both sides of the story: If the tree is fully cleaned, and your sanitizer is sufactant-based (such as StarSan) so that kills organisms on contact then maybe (and only maybe) you can get away without sanitizing. That's about as far as you can guess as to the consequences of not sanitizing the brew tree. If it's not clean, then forget it....


6

On the whole this the kind of process you need if you're starting with fairly dirty bottles that have been left to dry with residue in them. Naturally, once you've used the bottles and then you rinse them immediately, then they will be much cleaner after second use, and you don't need the sodium percarbonate soak - a rinse (for dust etc.) and then soak in ...


6

Don't worry about the foam, as far as I remember Charlie Tally, Head Chemist at 5 Star, has said that the starsan is broken down by the yeast. Also, when you fill the bottle most of the foam comes out as a "StarSan Worm", so there's relatively little left in the bottle. If you've not had any problems with head in your beer then your existing methods are ...


5

Absolutely. If you need to cool the bucket further you could alternate adding ice packs to maintain your fermenting temps.


5

Have you tried using a percarbonate-based cleaner first? Usually an Oxyclean or PBW solution will break up the gunk in my tubing with a few hours of soaking.


5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed ...


5

I would advise popping it out and cleaning it every time, cleanliness is next to godliness or at least next to not having contaminated beer.


5

Absolutely! I rinse after use then throw them in with my laundry whites. Couple tips. These don't have to be sterile or even sanitized. A good rinse is really the only functional need they have. If washing with laundry. Use fragrance free detergent with an extra rinse cycle. I just use oxyclean. Makes them soft and bright again. Air / line dry them. Don'...


5

The other advice looks good so far. Having a generally clean work space and equipment is very important, and the fully sanitizing equipment only really matters for things that will come in contact with the wort post-boil. To answer one of your other questions, yes if any equipment that needs to be sanitized does contact anything else that is not sanitized, ...


5

All humor aside it should clean easily with mild soap and water. I've found that dish soap 1:20 ratio in a spray bottle does well on latex paint for all kinds of mishaps. Don't use soaps with bleach. Test a small area for discoloring, but allow to dry before you decide. My paint does change color when wet but returns to normal once dry. Spray and let soak ...


5

No, it doesn't. Bentonite is a clarifying agent, similar to Gelatin. It helps settle the yeast and other haze causing elements, but it does not kill the yeast. Sulfites don't actually kill yeast unless you put a lot into your wine. The legal limit is 350ppm, but your wine would probably taste pretty bad at those levels.


5

Bacteria like to hang out in soft surfaces like rubber and plastic, which for us usually includes things like buckets, hoses, and o-rings. Also any metal fittings for your valves, etc. Glass bottles have none of these problems. You can safely clean and sanitize your bottles and reuse them for any kind of beer. If you are very concerned, the best way to ...


4

There are a lot of government regulations governing what can be labeled as a "Sanitizer". The product may work fine as a sanitizer, but if the company has not gone through the proper government channels and had their product tested as such (and I assume, pay a massive licensing fee to the government), then they can not put that on the label. If it's a ...


4

Fill it with a solution of warm water and PBW, Oxiclean, or another oxygen based cleaner. Let it soak for a few hours and it should come right off.


4

Unfortunately, whenever I use a blow off hose I ended up tossing it when I was done because its tough to clean. Rather than just an hour try overnight and make sure you are starting with warm/hot water. PBW is pretty powerful stuff especially when its warm.


4

It's probably from having too high of a humidity level in the fridge. I have this same problem in my fermentation fridge (develops darker spots of mold) and my keezer (no mold but moisture pools at the bottom of the freezer). I just make it a point to wipe out the excess moisture from the walls of these two whenever I am messing with beer. I have ...


4

I've also never had a real problem with my tubing. Always rinse immediately after using with hot water and then hang up... I typically forget About Them until next time I need them. At that point is another rinse and Starsan soak.


4

This page from the Celiac Disease Foundation may be helpful; scroll down to Cross Contamination. I doubt you will have any issues with metal or glass vessels or tools (especially if they are properly cleaned), but porous items may be suspect? It sounds like the note about airborne wheat flour may be the biggest issue (depending on if you are doing another ...


4

You should probably just rack to a second sanitary bucket, especially if you plan to add additional sugar to the cider for carbonation. Ideally, you use a separate bucket with a spigot to which you can then attach a "bottling wand". This allows you to fill the bottle from the bottom upwards, which significantly reduces the amount of oxygen that is absorbed ...


4

I've had 5-6 cats and 2 dogs for the entire 16 years I've been homebrewing. They are no bigger threat to your beer than you yourself are. Use StarSan in a spray bottle to clean things, not toxic cleaners like 409 and Windex.


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