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13

Usually the pellets will dissolve during boil and settle down to the bottom of your kettle when you cool your wort. Then, when transferring to the fermentor you can just leave them behind (easier to do with a siphon). Or Use a hop bag - put the pellets on the bag, when you are done with the boil simply pull the bag out.


13

There's a few consequences, none of them are game over's. First off, don't leave your lid on the kettle when you boil. This will effect your evaporation rate and you'll likely not hit your Original Gravity as you would expect. Also, Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a sulfur compound which leaves a taste of cooked or cream corn in your beer (a signature off ...


10

According to Brewkaiser, the ideal boil pH (room temp sample pre boil) should be around 5.2-5.4. Much lower than that, and you'll reduce hop utilitilization, but much higher and the hop utiliziation increases, but the bitterness is harsher. (The same process that causes tannin extraction at higher pH in the mash is at play in the boil also.) A higher pH in ...


10

If you have designed your recipe to account for adding the extra water at the end of the boil, then I see no issues what so ever. I would personally add a couple of litres of boiling water every 10 min or so rather than adding it all at the end, just to avoid over concentrating the sugars in the wort, which may encourage caramelisation & Maillard ...


9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


9

The hop pellets are not supposed to dissolve into your wort. Rather, the boiling isomerizes the alpha acids in the hops (and the isomerized alpha acids will dissolve into the wort), giving the wort its intended bitterness. However, it is totally normal to get an "oil slick", film or foam of hops on top of the boiling wort. Hops have three purposes: ...


9

One thing that no one has mentioned yet is that a stronger boil promotes beer clarity. The proteins in the wort are forced to "clump together" more. Increasing the size of the proteins like that causes them to fall out more easily.


9

Your high efficiency is due to using a lot more water than you need, washing every last bit of sugar out of the mash. Ultimately, you want to collect less wort. This will result in a lower efficiency. As such, you'll need to use more grain to account for the lower efficiency. If you had 22L at 17°Bx, then you started with 35L at 10°Bx with 90% efficiency. ...


8

No, you don't have to boil the full volume in AG brewing. I only had a 7 gal. pot when I started AG so I's boil about 5 gal. down to 3.5-4, then add top off water. Boiling less will reduce your efficieny because you don't collect as much wort. You need to use more grain to make a higher gravity wort at less volume, so you can top off afterward. That was ...


8

You've covered the main reasons that I could think of off the top of my head, ie, pasteurisation, flavour formation and isomerisation of hops. A quick search reminded me of the other two, which is that it drives off unwanted volatile compounds (eg, SMM - the precursor to DMS) and it causes proteins and polyphenols/tannins to bind and precipitate out in the ...


8

I use a bucket for my fermentor so I bought a steel mesh strainer. I then sanitize the strainer with starsan and place the strainer across the top of the bucket and run the wort through it. This strains out the hop gunk and helps with aeration by turning the wort into droplets as it falls into the fermentor.


8

There are several things to consider here. Certainly slowing down your boil will change your rate of evaporation, but that's only a problem if you're having a hard time hitting your target volumes. The main consideration is your bitterness contribution from hops. Alpha acid isomerization, like most chemical reactions, is temperature dependent. It happens at ...


8

I think the factor isn't that you want sterile wort, but sanitized wort. You may not get sterile wort from boiling, but that isn't a problem. The wort is surrounded by barely sanitary air, so it's going to be contaminated to some degree from the get go. The key point is that the massive yeast population (>100bn cells for a 5 gallon batch) scavenge dissolved ...


8

This gunk is what's known as "trub", and it is proteins left over from the hot and cold breaks. The experiment conducted here: http://brulosophy.com/2014/06/02/the-great-trub-exbeeriment-results-are-in/ seems to show that it doesn't really matter whether it's included in the fermenter or not, but most people still remove it/don't add it.


7

If you are siphoning your beer out of a flat bottom kettle/pot a whirlpool can be very effective. After you are done chilling put your brew pot in the location that you plan to siphon from. Using a clean and sanitized spoon stir that wort up into a good vortex. Once the whirlpool has started, remove the spoon and replace the lid. Then go about cleaning ...


7

A full wort boil is not absolutely necessary, but you shouldn't be topping off too much of your volume. Your efficiency will suffer greatly from topping off. Even if you're able to hit 80% effiency with 11.5L of wort (a big if), after boiling and topping off to 23L you'll end up with below 40% brewhouse effiency. You would also definitely be limited in ...


7

Alpha acids, pleasant bitterness you want in your beer, are in inactive form in hops. They need to be isomerized to taste the way it should. This takes time and temperature, around an hour of boil to convert all of it. Aromatic components of hops needs only to be washed out. But they degenerate and evaporate with boil, so the shorter you keep them hot, the ...


7

The problem is yeast, not unfermentables. Unless you made a starter, 1 pack for a 1.090 beer is way underpitching, assuming you made 5 gal. A single pack might work for 1 gal. at that gravity, but not 5. Also, a 1.010 FG for a 1.090 beer would make it very thin and bodiless. There is no accurate way to calculate FG.


7

Q1) No chance of off flavors just from this. Q2) Yes, this is normal. The post boil gravity will always be higher than pre boil because of the water lost to evaporation. In your case about 12% of the water was boiled off, resulting in a 12% increase in gravity. Assuming a 5 gallon batch, you boiled off about 0.6 gallons.


7

There are two potential, but not serious, issues with boiling the volume lower than full: 1. Maillard reactions (not caramelisation) at higher wort gravity tend to be more prominent. Sometimes it's good (e.g. when you boil down first runnings when making dubbel), other times not so good (witbier and other light stuff). 2. Hops tend to be under-utilised in ...


6

You'll be fine, as long as there isn't some obvious source contaminating the snow - like if it's actually falling off of a tree or roof and not coming directly from the clouds. Snow is basically freeze distilled so it's pretty clean. I suppose if it's coming down very hard and several inches of snow fall in there it could it could dilute it a little bit, ...


6

Raising the mash above 78 C generally runs the risk of extracting polyphenols, which will add astringency to your beer. Additionally you'll extract other compounds that will make having a clear product more challenging. Boiling with grains can be done if your boiling a small portion of your mash and returning it to increase the temperature of the overall ...


6

I add nearly freezing water to chill it quicker to pitch temperature. 1 gallon of near frozen I add to 4 gallons of wort to chill it to lager pitch temperature quicker. Once my immersion chiller cannot reduce the temperature any further, I introduce the near freezing water into my wort. I do not notice any negative effects. The hops are still very nice ...


5

There are various ways to increase efficiency and one of them is to sparge more, collect more wort and boil longer. The issue with that is that the sparge wort is "lower quality" than the first runnings. According to Kai Troester, mash efficiency is composed of (conversion efficiency)x(lauter efficiency). Troester efficiency Obviously, raising either ...


5

I leave everything in until after the wort is chilled. If I use pellet hops, they go through the pump and into the fermenter. In over 400 batches done like this, it hasn't caused any problems.


5

No, a mash and short boil will be fine. I sometimes add enough grain to account for an extra gallon or so on a regular-sized all-grain batch, then pressure-can or freeze the resulting wort for starters in the future.


5

Bottom line: its impossible for the gravity to decrease during boil. You only evaporate water, leaving an increasingly sugary solution. So there is an error with your preboil postboil or both gravity readings. Most common reasons for incorrect readings: Incomplete Mixings Failure to to a temperature adjustment Related to the second - Uncalibrated ...


5

I believe alpha-acid isomerization occurs well short of boiling (like 170-180°F), so you should be fine on hop additions and bitterness. You'll get less boiloff/evaporation, especially with the lid on, so you might need to adjust your original gravity expectations accordingly. There might be a reduction in any kettle caramelization or darkening you would ...


5

You don't need to stir regularly. Hops, pellet or otherwise, do float around pretty freely. I have never heard of hops sticking to the bottom of the pot, nor has it ever happened to me. I only stir occasionally to get that hop crud of the sides of the pot above the boil line back into the pot. And I stir to manage the foam early on in the process. ...


5

A difference of a few degrees (208 vs 212) is not very significant from an isomerization perspective. Studies have shown that isomerization continues to occur in whirlpools at or below 200 degrees. Things that could have affected utilization: Wort strength - higher gravities will lower utilization You mentioned extra pre-boil volume - as long as you hit ...


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