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6

Based on my experience and priming experiments I've done, honey adds no flavor when used as priming. You only a tiny bit and it ferments out leaving no flavor behind. In addition, since the fermentability is variable, you don't really know what your carbonation level will be.


5

Honey is almost 100% fermentable, so if added at bottling, it can increase carbonation and potentially result in gushing overcarbonated bottles or even explosions. You can however use it to prime the bottles instead of sugar. In proper amounts you will get normal carbonation. I have used honey one time as priming sugar and it worked well, however I forget ...


5

Contamination('infection') will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. ...


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


4

I was going to point out that organisms that produce endospores, like Clostridium botulinum survive in honey, but then I remembered that you can not kill them by boiling. The spores could also be naturally present in anything you brew or preserve. This is why you should use a pressure cooker for canning non-acidic foods. I did a bit more research, and found ...


4

People will tell you that bugs won't grow in raw honey, and they're right. The bad news is that they're still there and they'll grow just fine when you add water to make the must. (Let's remember people, there are bee parts in this stuff...) If you pitch well with a very large yeast population, it is possible to have a fine ferment and a fine mead because ...


4

Yes it is still useful. You at least know where you are starting, as chthon states the second part of adding 50g to 1l of 1050 solution doesn't give 1100 solution. Here is a great table that illustrates that dissolved sugar in g/l is linear with SG. I converted it to a graph here Don't confuse this with adding 57 g of sugar to 1 l of water to get 1020 ...


3

Your first idea is correct. Your gravity reading will be incorrect if not everything is dissolved. However, the second part on adding the honey is incorrect. The gravity reading means how many times heavier than water the solution is. So if 1 liter of water weighs 1 kg, 1 liter of solution weighs 1.050 kg in your example. But this does not mean that only ...


3

Your options for stopping fermentation are to add chemicals (which you mentioned don't want to do), pasteurize it with heat, or cold-crash it to make the yeast go dormant. If you think you can end up with greater than 15% ABV, another option is to let the yeast finish out on its own and you can dilute it back to where you want it. You back-sweeten at the ...


3

Why use honey when table sugar is actually a better substitute and more readily available? Yes you can use honey, but measuring it out and adding it to each bottle or en masse to the bottling bucket will be tricky, especially ensuring the honey is evenly mixed in the bottling bucket. Some people recommend using DME to prime, and while this may be the ideal ...


2

These are very thick bottles. While I wouldn't let them pressurize forever, if you keep them cold, wear leather work gloves, and bring them outside in a bucket of ice water, you should be able to open them safely (and messily). I also recommend using safety glasses. For safety (and cleanliness) reasons, I wouldn't try to save them. You might be ok if you ...


2

The original gravity reading was probably low due to insufficient mixing. Unless you stir the wort vigorously for a good while, it will stratify with sugary wort at the bottom and thin wort at the top. See this question for more details about why your starting gravity might be low. The final gravity reading is probably correct. Did you taste the beer ...


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur -...


2

Apparently it IS possible to get the ABV without knowing the OG by using both a hydrometer and a refractometer. See here: http://www.woodlandbrew.com/2013/02/abv-without-og.html


2

If I understand correctly, given your recipe you cannot measure original gravity (because you added more sugars in the form of honey after fermentation began) and therefore you need to find a way to estimate original gravity. You will (eventually) measure final gravity and use a calculator to estimate ABV. I would estimate the original gravity contribution ...


2

You can adjust the sweetness in two other ways not already mentioned. Through adjusting the mash temperature and time. This will affect how much the natural starches are broken down. Generally mashing at a higher temperature will yield a less fermentable wort and could lead to a "sweeter" tasting beer. This sweetness would be a malty sweetness. Using a high ...


1

There are several ways you could go about trying to make a sweet beer. Honey will of course add sweetness, but only if the yeast do not ferment it away in the bottle. (Which will also cause the bottles to explode, if you add too much of it.) As for non-fermentable sugars, I found the following list on https://www.homecidermaking.com/non-fermentable-sugar-...


1

This sounds like a pre hopped can of malt..... So its probably the can of malt with hops adding more bitterness then expected. I would let it sit, and it should mellow out. if not you could add some un hopped wort..... but I would do is let it sit and mellow out.... RDWHAHB (relax, don't worry, have a home brew) also from brewferm Brewferm beers are ...


1

The sugars in honey are primarily fructose (38%) and glucose (32%). These are simple sugars, so bakers yeast will happily ferment it. As @Dave mentioned in a comment, for a lot of intents and purposes (except actual beer brewing) bakers yeast is identical to brewers yeast... and as I have posted before, it wasn't until single-cell yeast cultures were ...


1

As Thomas answered, safety is paramount right now. Glass shrapnel is a serious reality, and you don't want that in your eyes, hands, face, anywhere. Wear gloves, wear glasses, I'd even recommend a jacket/sweater when venting to keep shrapnel out of your arms/torso. Keep your beer as cold as possible to slow down fermentation. Store them away from ...


1

There are a lot of questions/comments in there, so I'll try to address them below. A quick tl;dr though: It will probably clear eventually, but the 5-gallon will probably take longer than the 1-gallons. If you can cold-crash it, it will speed things up. You can try clarifying agents, but they may mess up your plan to bottle carb. I don't know, though, I ...


1

Weyermanns Abbey Malt adds honey flavour and aroma. There are other Honey Malts available, but I have not used them. Add the malt to your mash or do a steep (depending on if your kit is all grain or extract).


1

Saflager S-23 is a lager yeast. http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SFG_S23.pdf 9-22°C as it ferments 12-15°C when you lager the beer. http://billybrew.com/swamp-cooler-homebrew try doing swamp cooler to get that temp down and under control. Lager not recommended for someone starting out. If you can't control fermantion temperature then ...


1

It will raise the OG, but add little to no flavor. If you want honey flavor to remain, you need to add it to a secondary fermenter. Even then it will likely be minimal. If you add honey to the boil, the flavor and aroma will be driven off by boiling and fermentation. Whether or not the yeast will be fine depends on what yeast you're using, how much of it ...


1

Well, I'm a microbiologist and brewer. Bacteria will not GROW in pure Honey but they can survive. When honey is diluted to make mead it's party time for bacteria! Heating honey by boiling may kill some bacteria but spores can survive (including Clostridium). To kill spores you need a temperature of 121C sustained for a minimum of 20 minutes. This is ...


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