6

Yes, it can be fixed and the plan sounds fine. Make a log of this, and review when brewing in future so you can fix the process and avoid these problems in future brews. K├Âlsch is lightly hopped so don't worry about adding additional hops. Your lower gravity will have increased utilization slightly so adding non-hopped wort will go some way to balance this ...


4

Sounds like everything is proceeding on schedule. Congratulations -- you've made beer! Don't worry about the rate of bubbling. If it was fermenting vigourously in the first few days, you've got nothing to be concerned about. I wouldn't touch it right now. In fact, I wouldn't even rack it to secondary. Let it sit another couple of weeks, and then check the ...


4

IBU perception can vary a lot but what you're estimating is about half the IBU making this IPA more like a Pale Ale. If everything was "the same" for this brew. I'd say you had old hops. When repeating recipes it's important to record Alpha Acid % of your hops, so they can be adjusted in future batches. Also the age of the hops has a big effect too. There ...


3

Absolutely nothing wrong with what you did.


2

Nope, you're looking good. Normal, healthy fermentation for most beers completes in about 3-10 days, depending on the yeast and beer in question. Is the first gravity reading you've taken? Wait a couple of days and take another. If it hasn't changed, then fermentation is complete. At this point your beer has achieved 85% attenuation, which is a little on ...


2

The amount of time carbonation takes can vary. 1 week is a very short time and I'm not too surprised by the result you found. Make sure to store the bottles around 70F to speed thing up. As to the off flavor, there's no way we can tell unless you can describe it better. Take a look at this How to Brew troubleshooting


2

That yeast needs a lot of O2 at pitching and rousing during fermentation. Add to that the fact that it's only been 5 days. Baby it along for another 2 weeks. It could also be dependent on your recipe.


2

It basically looks completely fine to me. From the pictures its impossible to tell if its contaminated. As long as your sanitation was good before the wort went in, and you kept it closed for the first 7 days, I am sure its fine. If the temp has been swinging a little bit its normal for the bubbles on top as CO2 is trying to escape as it got warmer. If ...


2

There's good news and bad news here. The good news is that if you bottle your beer tomorrow and drink it within the next few weeks, then it should still be ok, maybe with a touch of sourness. The bad news is that does look like contamination. Your photo mentions "flavor bubbles". Often there are fine bubbles from the CO2, like in your first photo, but not ...


2

Your finishing gravity always that high? Seems a bit high given the OG and the residual sugars could affect perceived bitterness. If the beer is finished, there is no way to add real bitterness. You could dry-hop with a couple OZ of Citra & Amarillo but it will only add aroma.


1

Looks normal Some yeast will flocculate into snowflake clumps or even strands. Jack M05 is rated as a high flocculation yeast.


1

Nice brew system Gratz I have no doubt you're reaching good hot break temperatures. Since your system is electrical heat with temp control with a vented hood. Water to Grain Ratio If I had to guess I'd say your mash water grain ratio was really thick less than 1.25 quarts per pound. A thick mash will extract more proteins making it more cloudy. The flaked ...


1

The biggest consequence of what you did is to add an extra liter of water. Your finished beer will be slightly lighter. For example, if it was to be 4.5% Alcohol by Volume, it might be 4.1-4.2% ABV instead. You probably won't notice the difference.


1

Hose barbs in that size range seem to usually have a 1/16th inch wall thickness, so the bore would be 0.125" smaller than the corresponding hose. In other words, to get a minimum 1/2" ID in a hose barb, you'll need a 5/8" barb, and change your hoses to 5/8 as well. To answer the question above, try a hydraulic supply shop, Grainger, truck repair, etc. ...


1

It's not ideal, but it's probably not a huge problem, either. It's highly unlikely to ruin your brew. It's most likely happening because the wine in the carboy is cooling, thus reducing pressure inside the carboy, literally sucking the liquid from the airlock like a straw. Did you put the liquid into the carboy hot or warm? What's the ambient temperature ...


1

I made the exact same stuff last summer. That stuff is LETHAL! lol I got terribly drunk. What you have made is referred to as Country Champagne or Country Sparkling Wine, the sediment is Yeast which made the fizz and alcohol. You have three options in my opinion Cold Crashing your bottles and store upright and undisturbed till March. Transfer them gently ...


1

I use something called a "china cap strainer" to strain my wort before it goes into the fermentor. These things work greater, as it fits into the funnel I use on top of the fermentor and they have a good handle to jostle the strainer to encourage the wort to work it's way past the captured hops and trub. An example of a "china cap strainer" can be seen ...


1

I chill my wort in place on the stovetop and transfer to my primary with an autosiphon. But I transfer to a larger metal screen strainer on top of my primary fermentor that has a paint strainer bag arranged inside it. This strains out the debris (hops, whirlyfloc, and hot break) and helps with aeration. I have also used a nylon stocking and the paint ...


1

There are oversized O rings available to fix this problem. One place to ghet them is William's Brewing (not an endorsement for the company, just the product). There may be others.


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