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7

Well BIAB is all grain brewing. Not to be confused with just steeping specialty grains in extract brewing. If you have a kettle big enough to do a full mash, doing a partial mash and extract is pointless. Unless it's a high gravity beer that would normally need a much larger mash. Basically if you're mashing at all it doesn't save time doing only partial. ...


6

'Is there a disadvantage to screening my grain to remove the flour before mashing?' Aside from your point about losing extract (the most important thing, really), a few things I can think of: Fine flour disproportionately represents potential extract, by weight. "Fine grits and flour [...] yield some 50-60 % of the weight of milled malt but 80-90% of the ...


6

Toss them in the laundry with your whites. No farbric softner. Then air dry.


6

In practice a nylon bag can become discoloured but it rarely gets so contaminated as to actually affect the flavour of a brew. As long as the bag is cleaned of all debris and thoroughly rinsed it should keep well. It is advisable to soak the bag in water soon after the grain is emptied out. If the bag becomes stained or clogged then soaking in a solution of ...


5

I've never heard of non-food-grade stainless steel. Some are more or less susceptible to corrosion than others, but as far as I know all stainless steels are food grade. [...] stainless steel is a safe option when it comes to use with food and beverage, as there are no chemicals that can migrate into your food from these products. From http://...


4

Looks like you are doing it right to me, using those calculators. The only thing that might change your actual # is the calibration temp of your hydrometer. Be sure that it is 20C. Some hydrometers are closer to 15 or 18C, depends on the manufacturer. Although that won't change your OG much. 67% mash efficiency does seem like a normal for BIAB. If the ...


4

I can see that your post mash and post boil gravities are really off. For example you state an estimated post mash gravity 1.037 after correction, but then have 1.030 post boil. This would only be possible if you diluted with water. Post boil will always be higher from the boil off evaporation. In any case, I think the hydrometer calculator is setting you ...


4

You are correct in assuming that Partial Mash and All Grain are BIAB-compatible brewing methods. I would say that if you are planning on doing Partial Mash, a bag would be recommended since you usually don't want to lauter the brew (maybe you do in some cases, but not any I have come into contact with). This means that having some specialty grains and ...


4

BIAB IS all grain brewing. But it's not traditional multi-vessel brewing. Some batch sparge with a cooler, others fly sparge with a sprinkler, some use a bag for the whole water amount (BIAB). All-grain brewing, each of them. As for sparging, do note that some BIAB brewers add a sparge step, where they may pour a gallon or so of hot water over the grain ...


4

I do normal all grain procedure and the situation is the same. The biggest heat flux will be on outer diemeter of the mash tun. The better the insulation, the smaller the heat flux will be. Usually i have one ds18b20 sensor in the middle and second one on the side of the mash tun. Then i compare readings from both sensors and if the deviation is more then ...


3

I think your over whether 'BIAB can achieve the wonders of a mash tun brewing' is only commonly understood as well as questions like 'do I need a starter'? or 'Can I possibly make beer without pure oxygen aeration?' (The answer being: If it works for you then that is your answer) The Mash tun, or BIAB, or partial mash (or even extract), question is not if ...


3

Sounds normal to me. When I was first reading up about BIAB, it was mentioned in several places that this is an issue. Absorbing 3/4 of 5 gallons seems like a bit much, but it will absorb some (I've heard about a quart per pound?). It probably didn't absorb that much, as the wort would drain out of the bag if you could hold it over the pot for 10-20 minutes. ...


3

I also use BIAB with a bag bought online. The flour from the crushed grain flows pretty freely out of the mash and is present after the boil and chill as a huge cloud settling towards the bottom of my fermenter. Whirlfloc definitely helps clump the stuff together with the cold-crash material, but the goop clogs every filter I have tried. I've also ...


3

No soap. Don't weaken them in the sun. Just drop in PBW for at least 1/2hr. Rinse in hot water (at least as hot as the water was when you started soaking it). Drip dry


3

I do BIAB, and I don't think protein rest has much with extraction efficiency. Mashout temperature has, however: if wort has lower viscosity due to higher temperature, it will better flow from the grist. Another thing I do is "micro-sparge" with 1-2 liters of water over the grain bag (in my case it's a basket, actually) on top of the kettle. When it comes ...


3

A brewster friend had just such a set up for all-grain brewing. It seemed to work well and the beer was fine. It seemed easier to handle the smaller bags as they were not as heavy (or so full of wort).


3

In theory this would work. The only caution would be to make sure your milled grain very well blended to have even portions of each grain in each bag. Since mixing it as a whole as once in the mash would not be an option as easily if it was one a large bag. Reason for this is to to make sure enzymes from your base malt are everywhere so your mash gets ...


3

I have been using this method for three years or more, starting off with four bags and then cutting back to three, with between 1.5kg and 2kg per bag. If mixing grain, I split the different varieties equally between the bags. These are what we call laundry bags in Australia (designed to hold delicate items in washing machines). Initially I used to tie the ...


3

I've not experienced any carry over from stained bags or beer lines for that matter. If it's clean, it's clean. Staining is usually just a pigment change. I guess it's about like tasting a washed white shirt with a ketchup stain and expecting to taste ketchup. Nope just normal cotton flavor! :-)


2

Moving the wort between kettles complicates things, since you're dealing with both hopped and unhopped extract. While you'll be able to make beer this way, it complicates hitting IBUs. Since you're boiling both kettles anyway, why not add hops in proportion to their volumes, e.g. 2/3 in the 10l kettle and 1/3 in the 5l kettle. There is then no need to ...


2

Copying most of my answer from https://homebrew.stackexchange.com/a/12575/3925 I've adapted my technique for BIAB over a few batches. These steps are my version of merging BIAB with all-grain and sparging. I've used this technique with all-grain recipies, and associated water temperatures for mash and sparge, and it turns out great. I got some buckets from ...


2

I made a great Falconers Flight IPA using no chill last winter. I simply added a sufficient bittering charge 40-50 IBUs at 60 minutes. Then added 3 oz of pellets at Flameout. Put the lid on and walked away. I transferred to the fermentor the next day. With a couple days left in fermentation I added another 2 oz of FF pellets to the fermentor. 5 days ...


2

I'd suggest you do a basic bittering addition, then do a massive "flameout/cube" hopping, like 3-4oz of something pungent. Ferment with a clean yeast, and that will give you some idea of a baseline for non-dry-hopped hop aroma and flavor. I did this basically with EKG once, and it was underwhelming, but good hoppy beers are tough to nail and it could have ...


2

I use 5 gallon paint straining bags for 5 gallon BIAB. My suggestion is to buy a two pack (that's how they're sold) and use one as a sizing pattern.


2

First, I can't see your images from my work computer so I'll explain it from scratch. Each type of grain (base malt and adjuncts) have a potential yield of sugar. For simplicity's sake, we'll use the "point system" (that is Specific Gravity minus 1 times 1000), so for a Specific Gravity of, say, 1.040, we would say that you have 40 point (1.040-1 = .040, ....


2

I have not had any issues with efficiency with my BIAB setup. But it does takes time to understand how your system works and I squeeze the hell out of my bag. (Without a single issue with astringent flavors.) I use this spreadsheet to help me figure out my volumes. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/15GRihejTkN0rgrXlFxpBugsVlUSdrZPXQWZmFrnZEhw/edit?usp=...


2

Yes, you do simply put all grain (crushed!) in a bag. That's the point. However Brewdog's catalog calls for fly sparging, something you simply won't do. With fly sparging, your extraction efficiency can be about 80%. Yesterday I hit 95% (again, against my plan, and I really hate it, but that's just btw). Even 90% should be perfectly doable. Without sparge, ...


2

I tried wheat and rye only twice. First time I put all my grain thorough beta-glucan and protein rests. There was little to no foam. Second time, I did it only on unmalted grain, malted rye and malted wheat, adding barley later. And it worked like a charm. And maybe it's only placebo effect, but I think it tasted better. Grain is relatively cheap. If you ...


2

No that is not chill haze. It is a mixture of yeast, hops, and proteins that form from the hot and cold break. I agree it looks like you have some Starsan in your batch. I learned early swap the blow off tube for a airlock before you cold crash. Once active fermentation starts you will see all kinds of floating yeast and stiring going on. It's really my ...


2

I figure approximately 20-22 SRM. You might be pushing the color a bit towards the darker end, but it will work I think. Maybe go to 7oz each of the C60 and the Amber.


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