13

1) Can I just place my fermentation tank in this tub of water to counter the heat? Yes. This will work to a degree (ha, ha.) The water is slowly but constantly evaporating. The energy need to make liquid water into gas comes out of the water's temperature. This "evaporative cooling" will help cool your wort by a few degrees. 2) Will this method work during ...


12

This method is sometimes referred to as a "swamp cooler", and is well known and used in homebrewing circles. Honestly, if the brew shop employee told you it wouldn't work then they are either (a) trying to sell you a brewing fridge, or (b) not that educated on homebrewing. Change out some ice packs in the water twice a day and you get get down to the low ...


12

Just before you add yeast. Your wort will not be heated again Wort is full of nutrients, fullest it was or will be Temperature is optimal for microbiological growth No competition with other microbes No alcohol yet Everything that has contact with wort before yeast kick in are most crucial. For full bodied, weak beers and ales, bottling is in my opinion ...


11

What you propose will work fine. You can even keep StarSan in a spray bottle (mixed with distilled water it will last months or more) and spray down the surfaces. Although due to FDA regulations they have to list a longer contact time, Charlie Talley of 5 Star Chemical, makers of StarSan, has said that their tests show a 99.9% effectiveness after a 30 ...


10

I make a Bourbon Vanilla Imperial porter recipe that's pretty popular. When the primary fermentation is done, I split 2 vanilla beans lengthwise and scrape put all the "gunk" inside. I chop the pods themselves into 2-3 in. long pieces then add the "gunk" and pods to a secondary fermenter and rack the beer onto it. Start tasting it after about 5 days. ...


10

Most likely not. But only time will tell. Obviously not sticking your arm in you beer is preferable to not doing that. But relax and have a homebrew. You can absolutely leave it in there because it is covered with the same yeast that you are brewing with and therefore is not going to add anything beyond the yeasties you want in there. However, say you want ...


10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


10

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


9

Just use water. The evaporating liquid does not need to be a sanitizer, per se.


8

Probably overkill. Assuming the caps are sanitized, the capper does not come into contact with anything that it could spoil or infect on the bottle. At that point in your process, bottles and caps will be so covered by sanitizer, I'd say youre safe.


8

I think the factor isn't that you want sterile wort, but sanitized wort. You may not get sterile wort from boiling, but that isn't a problem. The wort is surrounded by barely sanitary air, so it's going to be contaminated to some degree from the get go. The key point is that the massive yeast population (>100bn cells for a 5 gallon batch) scavenge dissolved ...


8

According to this page, which was linked to recently on Basic Brewing Radio's facebook page, you can make no-rinse sanitizer with: bleach diluted to 80 ppm an equivalent amount of white vinegar to adjust the pH (mixed in after the bleach has been mixed into the water -- do not mix full-strength bleach and vinegar directly) This info is apparently backed up ...


7

Likely late in the game now, but you can also put oak chips on a sanitized cooking sheet at 200F or so and leave in the oven for 15 minutes or so. This will sanitize the chips, and subtly brings out some of the flavour, but not too much tannic or other astringent flavours. Essentially you are pasteurizing the oak chips by heating them to 138F (min), before ...


7

Water - it's cheap, it's always available, and does the job adequately. No need for anything else when something so simple works so well.


7

You don't need to do 90% of that. Surfaces need to be clean of matter before they can be sanitized. Things that are visibly dirty should be cleaned, but you don't need to – for example – scrub and soak your brew kettle before you use it … anything you add to it is going to be boiled, which will kill everything. The same goes for your rinsing bowl and ...


7

Short answer, yes you should. Longer answer, I often don't and haven't had any problems. Like many things in brewing, there's best practice and then there's what you can get away with.


7

Unless you were planning on heating the juice itself to a high enough temperature to kill anything in it, it's not really going to matter. Any bacteria or wild yeasts present on the inside of the carboy will also be in the juice itself already. If the juice is labeled as having been pasteurized, then it and its container are probably reasonably sanitary ...


7

No rinse needed, if you follow the description on the bottle for the proper mix. If I remember correctly, the sanitization compound gets deactivated at a pH that's normal for brewing. There is a nice podcast with the inventor of starsan, where he explains that even the 30 secs are not needed. I'll post a link for you.


7

Chlorine you can boil off before use, usually a hard boil for 20 minutes will get rid of Chlorine. Unless your water district uses a binder which is rare. Chloramine cannot be boiled off and needs to be chemically stripped. Campden tablets do well.


6

I'll try to present both sides of the story: If the tree is fully cleaned, and your sanitizer is sufactant-based (such as StarSan) so that kills organisms on contact then maybe (and only maybe) you can get away without sanitizing. That's about as far as you can guess as to the consequences of not sanitizing the brew tree. If it's not clean, then forget it....


6

This is what I do regularly for bottling. Start with clean bottles, fill (let's say) 3 bottles with starsan. After getting everything else ready to go, I'll start a pipeline: empty bottle 1 through a funnel into (new) bottle 4, then fill the just-emptied bottle 1 while emptying bottle 2 into bottle 5. Cap bottle 1. Start filling bottle 2 while transferring ...


6

How to Brew by John Palmer recommends soaking equipment for 20 minutes, and says that rinsing isn't absolutely necessary for the recommended concentration. The concentration he mentions is 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 gallon of water (4 ml per liter). I avoid bleach. I'm too worried about it introducing off flavors if it's not completely gone, and would ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. Inappropriate ...


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


6

I don't think it's a good idea, but might depend on product. You know why brown bottles are more popular than green or clear? Because light creates bad flavor and aroma in most beers. In my country it's known as skunks aroma. Strong UV lamp will do the same, only much faster. As far as I know, wine doesn't like light either. But I believe there might be some ...


6

Iodophor's active ingredient is iodine, which is toxic to humans in sufficient doses. The recommended dilutions of iodophor are sufficient to sanitize surfaces and assume that all but a trace of the iodophor will be removed and not ingested. A larger concentration of iodine would not be more effective and so would be wasteful, and also could begin to be ...


6

No. Use soap and water. Wash your hands for 20-30 seconds and make sure you wash your whole hand. I have no idea what dilution you would have to use to maintain efficacy or what dilution you would have to be below to not give yourself chemical burns.


5

Absolutely. If you need to cool the bucket further you could alternate adding ice packs to maintain your fermenting temps.


5

If you want to get really technical, you touch the handles of the capper, after which you may touch the inside of a cap before placing it on the bottle or on the capper magnet. But it's overkill.


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