12

Just before you add yeast. Your wort will not be heated again Wort is full of nutrients, fullest it was or will be Temperature is optimal for microbiological growth No competition with other microbes No alcohol yet Everything that has contact with wort before yeast kick in are most crucial. For full bodied, weak beers and ales, bottling is in my opinion ...


11

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


8

According to this page, which was linked to recently on Basic Brewing Radio's facebook page, you can make no-rinse sanitizer with: bleach diluted to 80 ppm an equivalent amount of white vinegar to adjust the pH (mixed in after the bleach has been mixed into the water -- do not mix full-strength bleach and vinegar directly) This info is apparently backed up ...


8

I think the factor isn't that you want sterile wort, but sanitized wort. You may not get sterile wort from boiling, but that isn't a problem. The wort is surrounded by barely sanitary air, so it's going to be contaminated to some degree from the get go. The key point is that the massive yeast population (>100bn cells for a 5 gallon batch) scavenge dissolved ...


7

You don't need to do 90% of that. Surfaces need to be clean of matter before they can be sanitized. Things that are visibly dirty should be cleaned, but you don't need to – for example – scrub and soak your brew kettle before you use it … anything you add to it is going to be boiled, which will kill everything. The same goes for your rinsing bowl and ...


7

Short answer, yes you should. Longer answer, I often don't and haven't had any problems. Like many things in brewing, there's best practice and then there's what you can get away with.


7

Unless you were planning on heating the juice itself to a high enough temperature to kill anything in it, it's not really going to matter. Any bacteria or wild yeasts present on the inside of the carboy will also be in the juice itself already. If the juice is labeled as having been pasteurized, then it and its container are probably reasonably sanitary ...


7

No rinse needed, if you follow the description on the bottle for the proper mix. If I remember correctly, the sanitization compound gets deactivated at a pH that's normal for brewing. There is a nice podcast with the inventor of starsan, where he explains that even the 30 secs are not needed. I'll post a link for you.


7

Chlorine you can boil off before use, usually a hard boil for 20 minutes will get rid of Chlorine. Unless your water district uses a binder which is rare. Chloramine cannot be boiled off and needs to be chemically stripped. Campden tablets do well.


7

Your brew is fine. If there's a problem it will be obvious when you taste it. Relax.


6

How to Brew by John Palmer recommends soaking equipment for 20 minutes, and says that rinsing isn't absolutely necessary for the recommended concentration. The concentration he mentions is 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 gallon of water (4 ml per liter). I avoid bleach. I'm too worried about it introducing off flavors if it's not completely gone, and would ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. Inappropriate ...


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


6

I don't think it's a good idea, but might depend on product. You know why brown bottles are more popular than green or clear? Because light creates bad flavor and aroma in most beers. In my country it's known as skunks aroma. Strong UV lamp will do the same, only much faster. As far as I know, wine doesn't like light either. But I believe there might be some ...


6

Iodophor's active ingredient is iodine, which is toxic to humans in sufficient doses. The recommended dilutions of iodophor are sufficient to sanitize surfaces and assume that all but a trace of the iodophor will be removed and not ingested. A larger concentration of iodine would not be more effective and so would be wasteful, and also could begin to be ...


6

Since it's on secondary, contamination risk is low, but for contaminants that have contact with the drink from now on. If the hair is there since the beginning of the fermentation, any possible contamination has already happened. Either way, it's better to remove the hair than to leave it there. Minor lighting shouldn't be a problem, sanitation is much more ...


6

No. Use soap and water. Wash your hands for 20-30 seconds and make sure you wash your whole hand. I have no idea what dilution you would have to use to maintain efficacy or what dilution you would have to be below to not give yourself chemical burns.


5

You've made sugar wine, called kilju in Finland. It's also the precursor to rum, which is distilled from a wine made from sugar cane juice or molasses. It's safe to drink, but to everyone's taste.


5

I would advise popping it out and cleaning it every time, cleanliness is next to godliness or at least next to not having contaminated beer.


5

The other advice looks good so far. Having a generally clean work space and equipment is very important, and the fully sanitizing equipment only really matters for things that will come in contact with the wort post-boil. To answer one of your other questions, yes if any equipment that needs to be sanitized does contact anything else that is not sanitized, ...


5

Bacteria like to hang out in soft surfaces like rubber and plastic, which for us usually includes things like buckets, hoses, and o-rings. Also any metal fittings for your valves, etc. Glass bottles have none of these problems. You can safely clean and sanitize your bottles and reuse them for any kind of beer. If you are very concerned, the best way to ...


4

I've had 5-6 cats and 2 dogs for the entire 16 years I've been homebrewing. They are no bigger threat to your beer than you yourself are. Use StarSan in a spray bottle to clean things, not toxic cleaners like 409 and Windex.


4

Use any sanitizer you like...in the amounts you use it won't hurt the septic system. Thfink about the hundreds of gallons of your septic tank vs. an oz. or so of sanitizer. I've brewed 455 batches, and I've sent the sanitizer from every one into my septic system with no ill effects.


4

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


4

It's not a bad idea. When flowing, the post is pushed down, then liquid covers the whole head of the post. If that head was previously exposed to the world, and/or has dried-up beer on it from previous use, then that can get into your serving lines, glass, growler, bottles, &c. If you have a spray bottle of star-san at the ready, it shouldn't be that ...


4

Boiling water (or wort in this case) will sanitize the pot and anything in the pot. No need to pre-sanitize. By the way, make sure the pot is clean of any physical matter or the wort will pick up unexpected flavors from it.


4

No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


4

Sanitation is paramount. That said, these are normal instructions for most early brewers. Mostly its because when people get started its assumed they don't make an investment in 8 gallon pots (probably because most stovetops will never boil a full 5 gallons). Most municipal water supplies have very low microbial contamination. When coupled with an ...


4

Before I write my answer, let me say that I'm not sure what's available in the UK. Here in the US, many of us use a product called StarSan, a no rinse sanitizer. However, you can't sanitize a surface until you've removed all of the organic material from in, so many brewers use a product with the brand name "OxyClean" - the generic version works as well - to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible