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There are many benefits in having accurate control over the temperature of your brew. It allows you to control many variables. You can: control the ester profile alter the speed of fermentation improve the health of your yeast speed up the clearing of your brew Lets look at 1, for the first 3 days you get the majority of your yeast reproduction, ...


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Seeing how your beer is at 22-23 degrees, I think the issues are more yeast related. Rousing the yeast one more time to see what you get might be your only option. I usually let the beers I brew go for two weeks, often three, before I check them. You could try and get a small active starter going with some fresh yeast. Say in a growler with a 1.030 DME ...


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Seems like a good plan. I conduct secondary with low fermentable addition in closed lid buckets without problems. These lids are not perfectly airtight, and this imperfection is enough to let CO2 out. Preferably use oldest (least tight) lid you have. Alternative is possible, too, but it doubles the chance of contamination, and will double oxidation. I would ...


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The utility of ramping up temperature can change wildly depending on yeast strain, pitch rate, wort composition, the fermentation temperature and much more. I wouldn't necessarily pin it to dark ales, but as you mention British Ale yeast, I'll speak to it from that stand point. Fermentation does create some of its own heat. As the fermentation winds down ...


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If you plan to steep grains to make more wort, be sure to boil it to kill spoilage organisms and also to remove the oxygen. You could try steeping another 0.5lb of the blackprinz and 1lb of the black wheat might give more of the stronger roastiness you'd expect in a robust porter, but since both of these malts is huskless, you're not going to get some of ...


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3.2Ltrs of Strike water & 3.49Litrs of Sparge water appears to be approximately correct for your process. Personally if I were brewing this recipe I might aim for higher volumes closer to 5.4L Strike and 4.4L Sparge, but this is for my own process and boiloff rate. As you can see, the exact volumes depend a lot on your own particular process and the ...


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Firstly, welcome back to the world of home brewing. Dried yeast during re-hydration are sensitive, but a little gentle shaking will not ruin the viability. I would leave it for about 7 days from pitching if you are no where near FG by then, then make a small starter and pitch that. Once there is alcohol in the mix you really want to make a starter to ...


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For a second batch you can try ester enhancement, but I don't know of a yeast that will give this ester in the amount you want without it being clouded with other esters and phenols. He'Brew Rejewvenator actually brews with concord and merlot grapes. There are many answers here how to do fruit additions What I would try actually is a post fermenation ...


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How did this go? I brewed a coconut IPA and used loose toasted coconut. The worst idea ever for beer. I had to siphon out the beer through two vessels and use a screen to clear the big bits. Next time, I will put the toasted coconut in a mesh bag. What a mess it was. Plus, I lost nearly 1/5 volume from all the liquid absorbed by the coconut.


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I would leave this alone (mostly). There are no red-flags in the water report. Bicarbonate and alkalinity are moderately well suited for a stout. If you want to tip the sulfate / chloride ratio toward malty you only need 1.5 to 2 grams of CaCl to do it. (Do you have a scale sensitive enough?) Put this in at the beginning of the boil.


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I'd heat it up for a while. In general, you do get better quality if you wait it out at a lower temperature, but if it's a question of whether you get the next brew down or not, and your brew is currently not moving at all, then it seems worthwhile. What I do is to just run hot water into the laundry tub with the brew bucket sitting in it. You can easily ...


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Yeast absorb a lot of those extra tastes from stuff you add to the kettle. If you want to get the maximum taste of a spice or alike, add it as a tincture at bottling time. And even then it may fade over a few months. Btw make sure to add extra carapils or flakes to the mash: oils in chocolate may render the poor head.


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