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6

Just becasue you don't use secondary doesn't mean you can't rack to a bottling bucket and bottle from that. That's what I do. So, to answer the question directly, the best way to bottle from a primary is to not bottle from a primary!


5

This looks like Pediococcus contamination: see here Is this lactobacillus? More information about spoilage here: https://www.craftbrewingbusiness.com/news/four-bacteria-that-will-ruin-your-beer/ Lack of sanitation might have cause this.


5

The downside would be potential oxygenation of the beer, but "rousing" of yeast is a long-established practice. I'd suggest gentle swirling rather than shaking.


4

Cold crash to help sediment and compact yeast. Safely tip the carboy 10-15° so you can maximize beer extraction at the end of racking (I use a couple of paperbacks). Do any movement or tipping of your carboy hours before racking so any disturbance can re-settle. Very carefully lower your racking arm down into the sediment bed. Use some sort of spacer so the ...


3

I like the stainless steel racking cane with the orange seal. (Steril Siphon Starter) https://www.morebeer.com/products/sterile-siphon-starter-3-5-6-65-gallon-carboy-smooth-necks.html?site_id=9 What's unique with this cane is You can actually move it to the side of a carboy about 2/3rds down and see what you're doing. The red top is visible in even dark ...


3

Dead Yeast check expectation date. When you did your "30 min starter" was there foaming? If not it's likely the yeast was dead. "80°C" will kill yeast. If you added your yeast to 176°F cider, it's dead. Repitch your cider. Providing that was a typo, here's some other possibilities. Bad Fermentor Seal if there is a bad seal, the air lock won't function ...


3

It's best to remove the hops, but it's not a deal breaker if you don't. It will just make it harder to siphon the beer later. There are 2 other options to consider...you can put the hops in a nylon or muslin bag so that the entire bag can be removed later. Or after the wort has been cooled post boil, you can pour it through a sanitized strainer into your ...


3

I think Secondary fermentation is a term that came over from wine making. Secondary fermentation in the wine world is where you have the malolactic fermentation happen. This is a bacteria not yeast and it reduces the malic (green apple) acids to lactic acids soften the wine. This usually is done in barrel storage.


2

No, you will be fine. This question has been answered before here and here. On a personal note, I just bottled a batch last night that sat in the primary fermenter for six weeks, and it tasted very good. Incidentally, racking to a secondary vessel introduces a very small risk of oxidation or infection, and is unnecessary work unless (a) you plan to long-...


2

If you plan to steep grains to make more wort, be sure to boil it to kill spoilage organisms and also to remove the oxygen. You could try steeping another 0.5lb of the blackprinz and 1lb of the black wheat might give more of the stronger roastiness you'd expect in a robust porter, but since both of these malts is huskless, you're not going to get some of ...


2

Yes, I believe it should say "top up to 4.54L with tap water..." I base myself on existing instructions for another Youngs kit... Youngs wine kit instruction The ideal situation is to have very little space left (perhaps 2 inches depending on the size of the container) to avoid oxydation.


2

At those temps yes it seems normal to me for it to go that fast. (I assume this is an extract batch and you were using ale yeast.) That high temp could have stressed the yeast out and they are too tired to finish strong at this point. Different brands of extract can finish higher than others. If its been about a week I'd say let it go for a little longer. ...


2

I use Cold Crashing with my 30L fermenter and it has significantly increased my yield whilst reducing sediment in the bottom of each bottle. If you're using a bucket or similar fermenter with a tap then there is minimal risk of disturbing the trub cake during bottling.


1

I would boil the spray-malt in some water. This will both dissolve and sanitise the malt. As soon as it is at roughly the same temperature as the ferment, add it in and stir well, but minimising splashing as much as possible, so as not to re-introduce too much extra oxygen. The existing yeast should have no trouble consuming the new sugars. There should ...


1

Obligatory Disclaimer I'm not at all experienced with brewing ... but I have some pretty good experience with spawning and cultivating mushrooms. That sure looks like a fungal growth to me. Classic mycelium threads, building into a network. Some Google Images for you that look pretty similar. Google Images : mycelium fungus As with all unknown fungi/...


1

You can always open the lid and carefully take a quick look to see how it's going. Usually the sings of infection are bad smell and white mold spots on the surface. If you don't notice any of that you're good, you can also take a gravity test to see how the yeast is doing and compare it to the other batches...


1

It got warm, so the pressure inside the fermentor increased, forcing gas out through the airlock, which you notice as bubbles.


1

Don't panic. Taste the beer. If it tastes like beer, it's probably ok. If it doesn't taste like beer, but not bad, you can do a couple of things. ONE: do nothing, bottle it, and wait to see how it matures. TWO: drop 2-3 campden tablets to sterilize the beer, then prime and bottle. THREE: Pasteurize, then add a little more malt and repitch with some ...


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