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13 votes
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Diluting beer after 11 hours of fermentation. What to expect?

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is ...
10 votes
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What are the effects of adding water after the boil?

If you have designed your recipe to account for adding the extra water at the end of the boil, then I see no issues what so ever. I would personally add a couple of litres of boiling water every 10 ...
  • 6,983
9 votes
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Will my Reverse Osmosis water lose its purity if its not used immediately?

'[W]ater will naturally absorb carbon dioxide from the air' Yes it will. But consider this: at atmospheric pressure and room temperature the solubility of CO2 is roughly 0.7 volumes (~1,400 ppm). ...
8 votes

Diluting beer after 11 hours of fermentation. What to expect?

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't ...
  • 6,983
7 votes

What are the various ways to remove chlorine/chloramine from tap water?

According to the New York City water report (page 20), all you need to do is transfer the water between two vessels 10 times to remove chlorine. I have been using this method for all of my homebrews ...
7 votes

How much Chloride in PPM is too much for All Grain?

There is a distinct difference between chloride, which is a dissolved Cl- ion, and free residual chlorine (or the longer-lasting chloramine ions). The chloride is likely fine. The 61ppm concentration ...
  • 159
7 votes

What are the effects of adding water after the boil?

There are two potential, but not serious, issues with boiling the volume lower than full: 1. Maillard reactions (not caramelisation) at higher wort gravity tend to be more prominent. Sometimes it's ...
  • 1,488
6 votes

How much Chloride in PPM is too much for All Grain?

As someone noted, chlorine and chloride are two different things. Basically, zero chlorine and chloramine is desirable in your beer. Chlorine can bind with phenols in beer and form chlorophenols, a ...
  • 2,947
6 votes
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Should I add water to an already fermenting batch?

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you ...
  • 1,432
6 votes
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Difference of water content for difference in taste

Different water profiles can change the taste of your beer. Especially when you brew a beer with - as you say - "nothing [...] complex with tastes". When there is no big hop aroma or lots of alcohol ...
6 votes

What are the effects of adding water after the boil?

I add nearly freezing water to chill it quicker to pitch temperature. 1 gallon of near frozen I add to 4 gallons of wort to chill it to lager pitch temperature quicker. Once my immersion chiller ...
  • 203
5 votes
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Adding gypsum after fermentation

Gypsum does two things: It releases calcium ions into the mash, which combine with phosphates from the grain to create an acid, thus acidifying the mash. It provides sulphate ions which contribute a ...
  • 27k
5 votes
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My airlock keeps becoming empty on one side, is that normal?

Totally normal. C02 is SLOWLY pushing the water to the opposite side of the lock. As fermentation starts to really kick in, you'll see much more movement and "bubbling" in the airlock.
5 votes

Does a Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) reading of 0 imply that my water has 0 ppm for the various minerals?

In principle that's what it means. So you could stop there and use your water as if it were distilled water. If you wanted to be thorough, you'd question the sensitivity of a $15 device. A quick ...
  • 27k
5 votes
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Brewing with rainwater / tank water

You probably want to get the water tested to ensure it is fit for human consumption. The rain itself should be fine, but the roof surface and storage vessels may not made of food grade/food safe ...
  • 6,983
5 votes
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Conserve water used in immersion chilling?

I start by saving the hottest water in my sink, to be used for cleaning the immersion chiller and other items post-brew. Once I have enough there, I save the water in buckets to be used for watering ...
  • 344
4 votes

Brewing with rainwater / tank water

If the air is really clean, you have this part covered. But is it? It is not only about how clean it is where you live - that is, in your area, near ground level. Is it clean up to 2000 feet? Was it ...
  • 3,718
4 votes

Water- distilled or not?

Short answer: No. In general, if your water is good to drink, it's good to make beer as well. I also have access to good water and I don't find it makes any difference on my finished product when I ...
  • 4,736
4 votes

Difference of water content for difference in taste

Yes, water has drastic effects on your beer. Your recipe, being simple, lends to allowing the water profile to shine. Even though your water source is close in local, different wells and Processing ...
4 votes
Accepted

water for brewing

Bandaid flavors in beer can come from a couple of sources. I wouldn't blame the water first, my guess it's Brettanomyces which is a spoilage yeast. It can give a variety of flavors but one of the bad ...
  • 3,002
3 votes

How can i stop losing so much water during brew

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First ...
  • 3,718
3 votes
Accepted

Water mineral additions, losses to mash, and evaporation in the kettle. I.e., does water lost to the mash result in a proportionate loss of ions?

You are targeting 200 ppm for your final 6 gallons of wort, but you need that same amount of mineral present in 7.5 gallons of wort, pre-boil. Not the same concentration (200 ppm), mind you, but the ...
3 votes

How long must water be boiled to remove temporary hardness (bicarbonates)

Here is a different opinion in Brewing Classic Styles (incidentally, also by John Palmer??): Here is a procedure to remove some of the alkalinity from the water: Add 1 teaspoon of calcium carbonate ...
3 votes
Accepted

How can I test the PPM of different minerals in my Water?

If you're insistent on testing it yourself, aquarium supply places purportedly have testing kits, but I haven't looked into them. You can also send a (pre- or post-filtered) sample to Ward Labs, who ...
  • 10.1k
3 votes

anyone know where good tutorials are for starting to brew lager

In general, you need to start preparing for temp controlled fermentation as well as good yeast management practices. That includes starters and learning to pitch more yeast that you would for a ...
  • 36.2k
3 votes
Accepted

How can i stop losing so much water during brew

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of ...
  • 608
3 votes
Accepted

pre-boil water the day before?

'Can I boil my water the night before brew day and leave in the HLT with lid on ready for the morning? ' Of course you can. This will help reduce chlorine and other volatile substances, precipitate ...
3 votes

How do I predict vaporisation during the boil?

I've not seen a calculator that's reliable. Could be calculated but too many variables: surface area, altitude, actual wort temperature etc. It's much easier to just do a boil test to establish your ...
3 votes

Brewing with rainwater / tank water

Rain water can be very close to RO or distilled. Rain is usually triggered by a solid particle (dust) and or atmospheric compression. Then as it falls it's collecting other particles from the air. ...
3 votes

How to dissolve water additions

Usually adding to the boil does well to get them mixed. If you're concerned about clumping you can take some of the hot wort into a cup and slurry the addition to add back to the kettle. Adjusting ...

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