6

Yes you can mash with popped corn, it can be thought of basically as torrified corn. You do not, however want to get the buttery flavor that we typically associate with popcorn in your beer so make sure you use an air popper beforehand. You are going to get the typical corn flavors come through, not necessarily a "popcorn" flavor, if that is what you are ...


6

Do not add the grounds. Add the liquid. And a gal. sounds like WAY too much. When I make a coffee beer, generally a cup or two of strong coffee is plenty.


6

If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...


4

Myricia Gale - Common names include Bog-myrtle and sweetgale. Also be aware: The plant has been listed as an abortifacient and therefore should not be consumed by women who are, or might be, pregnant. In the UK it is pretty easy to buy on e-bay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/171997384055 I see from your profile/linkedIN you are may be in Spain, so take a ...


4

We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!


4

You can make a rice porridge in the rice cooker that will make the rice into a thick paste (with some very soft grains still floating around). Add extra water to the rice cooker (maybe double the usual amount?), let it boil for a few minutes and then turn down the power (the rice cooker would try to boil all the liquid away if you let it). Then wait a while ...


4

Yes it is still useful. You at least know where you are starting, as chthon states the second part of adding 50g to 1l of 1050 solution doesn't give 1100 solution. Here is a great table that illustrates that dissolved sugar in g/l is linear with SG. I converted it to a graph here Don't confuse this with adding 57 g of sugar to 1 l of water to get 1020 ...


3

No, just toss them in there. The beer is nearing the end of fermentation and will have a sufficiently inhospitable environment for any contaminants to flourish. The acidity, alcohol, and yeast itself are enough. Also, keep in mind that anything you do at home is merely sanitization, not true sterilization.


3

If it is boiled, last minute tops, just enough to sterilize it. My recommendation is to add it after the fermentation is completed, before bottling/kegging. If you do add them at the end of the boil, I'd probably multiply the quantity by 1.5x or even 2x. With lemongrass, I get more aroma than I do flavor. the key is to crack the lemongrass before using ...


3

You're right that flaked barley normally has to be mashed to extract the potential yield. However, the main contribution of the flaked barley isn't so much the sugar potential, but beta glucans and proteins. The beta glucans contribute to the thicker mouthfeel, and the proteins to the foam (head). While you may get a little starch in the beer from steeping ...


3

Classic Cream Ales which are an American contribution to the world of beer have use flacked maize or corn as a staple ingredient for three centuries. It started out as a way to brew when barley was in short supply and expensive cutting the cost of the Grist. Cream Ales are generally lighter, less ABV, and refreshing. They do have a slight background hint of ...


3

Your first idea is correct. Your gravity reading will be incorrect if not everything is dissolved. However, the second part on adding the honey is incorrect. The gravity reading means how many times heavier than water the solution is. So if 1 liter of water weighs 1 kg, 1 liter of solution weighs 1.050 kg in your example. But this does not mean that only ...


3

The simple answer is: for whole fruit it's difficult to estimate - how much sugar was extracted from the fruit?! The potential gravity contribution of fruit juice can be determined simply by putting some juice into a refractometer. Obviously it's possible to squeeze the juice out of the type of fruit in use. Generally fruit sugars are comprised of ...


2

Flaked corn does lighten the body. Body is basically thick malty sweetness, so thinning out that malty sweetness with something that ferments completely lightens the body. (I'm not sure why Tobias is suggesting adding alcohol without sweetness doesn't lighten the body, diluting the sweetness with alcohol, or water, or anything non-sweet is the definition of ...


2

Flaked wheat is your best bet. It is unmalted as well. Otherwise, if you truly have simply dried wheat you need to perform a cereal mash on that stuff to get at the starches (even if you did crush it).


2

I've only experienced it through a brewing buddy of mine. He used it to 5% of the total fermentables, the results were lack luster. It almost gets entirely fermented out so much of that character is lost. And then you're only using a small percentage of it in the final product anyway. The best way to get some tequila flavor is to add some at bottling. ...


2

Assuming spelt has the same properties as wheat, there's no need to gelatinize the spelt as a separate step. The gelatinization temperature of wheat is low enough that it will occur at normal mashing temperatures. You should mill the wheat in the normal way. If you're using a two-row mill like the Barley Crusher, you could set the gap slightly smaller than ...


2

Quick Version I don't know about the flavour. As long as you are using it with a base malt you can use up to ~50%, you don't need to get malted triticale or pre-cook it(see below). Also, I have no idea where you could find some in the UK; if you can find some flaked then try that. PS: if you know where to find some please post a link here, because I am ...


2

You can use normal orange peel as well. Just buy an orange or two, peel them avoiding the pith and use that. I have never found it a big difference between bitter orange and "sweet" orange peel. Most of the stuff in the homebrew stores is pretty old, at least around me anyway. The orange powder may work, but without knowing whats in it or what it is I ...


2

Sound more like a Cream Ale recipe, Blonde Ale shouldn't have corn. It can be up to 25% wheat though, I would replace the flaked corn with flaked wheat, or just 2-row to remove it completely. I've done this Strawberry Blonde before, it turned out nice. Used real strawberries, ditched the fruit extract, did all grain. Recipe is in the dl docs. https://www....


2

I have made two batches of beer using air popped corn. They were extract ales, my first batch used 1lb of corn, my second batch used 2 lbs of popped corn, it takes a while to dissolve the popped corn in a kettle, but it will fit. The first time I had it was from a micro brewery for a popcorn festival, and I was surprised as it was good, so I just had make ...


2

Ideally, you would obtain 1.05 times the weight of your sugar, because for 342 g of sucrose you would need 18 g of water. This is based upon the molar masses of both components. This would of course almost be a physical impossibility, because that would mean that the contents are probably not liquid any more, and you would not be able to dissolve 342g of ...


2

Actually, no difference at all in the kinds of sugar. The difference could be made that "brewing sugar" is added at the stage of the boil, and "priming sugar" is added at bottling time, for carbonation. However, all sugars used are either glucose (or dextrose, different name, same product), which is sometimes sold under the name of "brewing sugar" sucrose,...


1

If you wanted to be really safe you could soak it in vodka or moonshine to kill any germs. For the most part you should be fine though.


1

What you propose will work. You can also use Minute Rice, in which case you can just toss it on the mash and not have to precook the rice either way.


1

Sounds like a good idea to me. The temperature is high enough to sanitize the ingredients being added, yet lower than boiling so not all the delicate volatile aromatics are driven off. You might also consider trying this with a hopback and a plate or counterflow chiller. The theory is that since the hopback and chiller are sealed, any volatiles that are ...


1

You can certainly use adjuncts with extract kits. Definitely keep in mind that your extract is already hopped, but you could add more hoppiness, or use dandelions if you wish. The key is finding the right time to introduce your adjuncts. I'm currently fermenting an American Porter. I added a few hop pellets when I mixed the extract with water that had been ...


1

When I first got into homebrewing, I started out adding my own twist to kits, I found this video really helpful when adding my own hop tea to bump up the hoppiness. You could also do a similar thing with speciality grains (such as crystal or amber malt). This will also help detract from the 'tang' you often get with kits and extract.


1

As brewchez indicated, flaked wheat can be used directly. However, if that isn't easily obtainable for you, your next best option is to use a blender. You can blend 1-2 cups at a time this way. It helps to add a little bit of water to the mix to help keep the kernels from bouncing around as much. Just keep pulsing the blender until the wheat kernels are the ...


1

I doubt that the wheat was too hard for your LHBS' mill (which is likely motorized and has heavy stainless steel rollers). The issue is that the gap is too big, and the knurled rollers have nothing to grab onto. So the wheat falls between the rollers without being crushed. Reknowned homebrewer and beer historian Randy Mosher states, "generally roller mills ...


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