7

Yes you can. In fact I did it a few times myself, blending too dark beers for my taste with some lighter beers to create the perfect depth. But, if the mixed beers use different yeast strains, it is possible they both have different attenuation levels. The yeast from one beer can continue to ferment the sugars of the other beer. Fermentation starts again ...


5

Basically what you've described is cold conditioning an ale, a fairly normal practice. It allows the beer to clarify and smooth, the same way it does with a lager. There is no need to let the beer warm before bottling. There's still plenty of yeast in it, and the yeast will become active once you add priming sugar and let the beer sit at room temp to ...


4

I would just rehydrate the packet of yeast in 500mLs of water using a measuring cup. Then just pour 100mLs in each fermentor. The only thing that sounds 'crazy' about your experiment is the water type test. Extract contains the minerals from the original water source used when mashing at the manufacturer. So adding minerals or whatever you plan to do ...


3

Brewing a hazy beer like that I normally skip the Irish moss anyway so I think you're going to be fine. Fining and the effect of flavor is beer style dependent... for the most part. In nearly all styles that are generally clear to brilliantly clear there isn't a lot of loss of flavor components from clearing/fining. In styles where some of the flavor is ...


3

Mikkeller makes a Single Hop IPA series, which consists of the same base beer (same malts from a single batch, same yeast) but each of the 20 beers are hopped with a different hop. This has been brewed with exactly your goal in mind: to get to know the character of each hop.


3

Norwegian Farmhouse Ales mostly use Juniper as their anti-bacterial/bitter flavoring. They have been doing this for hundreds of years and well before hops were established as the go to bittering agent. You can read all about how Juniper is used at Larsblog


2

You can either replace the hops with something else or leave them out completely. Before hops became popular, people used various herbs (e.g., rosemary and sage). This was called a Gruit beer. Unfortunately people also used poisonous plants like nightshades, and that made the whole thing much less pleasant. If you stick to culinary herbs you'll get ...


2

It is hard to predict the krausen size, as it depends on many factors such as the temperature/speed of fermentation, number of yeast cells pitched. Depending on the fruit, it can create a big krausen, read this: Fruit mead - VERY vigorous fermentation Make sure to clean the fruit skin to avoid contamination. Mixing fruit with mead will work, you can ...


2

I have never used that for brewing but i have for ice cream. I would add it after the the Lag phase of fermentation, basically in the heart of fermentation, when the yeast is done multiplying, due to the Potassium Sorbate. I would start this in a small batch, probably gallon or less, or a fast ferment to see how much butterscotch flavor is needed. Then ...


2

The butterscotch is a typical fault in many beers and is produced by diacetyl an ester produced by yeast in growth phase. Diacetcyl is cleaned up at the end of fermentation by raising temp to 68°. If you want this flavor, I'd recommend using us-05 or California ale yeast at 62-65°F for entire fermentation. Or any lager yeast and never do the diacetyl rest ...


1

What you're describing is a Cream Ale. The BJCP describes the the flavor as: Low to medium-low hop bitterness. Low to moderate maltiness and sweetness, varying with gravity and attenuation. Usually well attenuated. Neither malt nor hops prevail in the taste. A low to moderate corny flavor from corn adjuncts is commonly found, as is some DMS. ...


1

Maybe just skip the kit yeast and get yourself five packs of US-05. That way you know you've got a consistent amount in each, and US-05 is a pretty neutral yeast, so it shouldn't contribute much in the way of additional flavors.


1

Just build a starter for 5 gallons and split evenly, 1500-2000ml is an average starter. Main benifiet here is to decant the starter wort and only pitch the slurry this will minimize the starters water contribution for your experiment.


1

Multiple single strain fermentation followed by blending gives much better control over the combined yeast character and is way more reproducible. It goes like this. Split the batch into multiple fermenters, innoculating each with a different yeast strain. You can split the wort volume equally the first time you brew the recipe. Ferment each part optimizing ...


1

Yes, yes I have made beer with no hops and all malt (and no other ingredients). It was awful. I mean truly vile.


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