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14

Dry hopping in primary is totally fine, I do it all the time. It does the exact same thing. The main reason for secondary is getting clearer beer, but I never do secondary as it increases the chance of oxidization and infection. I get very clear beer without secondary just by cold crashing and letting it sit for a while. After kegging/bottling, just let it ...


10

Upvote on the question, and someone will undoubtedly come by with a better answer, but here goes off the top of my head: Acetaldehyde (a-cee-tal-de-hide....nobody says it right!) is a precursor to alcohol. It is an intermediate compound that is formed prior to the formation of EtOH/ethanol during fermentation. So the weird thing is that acetaldehyde is ...


8

I've recently done the experiment. Zero boil hops, but dry-hopped with 6 ounces of high alpha acid hops (Summit, Simcoe and Apollo). This brew is quite bitter, whatever the reason, and it is of the same "kind" of bitterness one would expect from hopping in the boil and not particularly astringent.


8

You can unclog the diptube in place, but it'll just clog right up again. I'd say your best bet is to siphon the beer to another keg, trying to leave as much sediment behind as possible. I would also stick the keg in your fridge for a few days to help coax the hops and proteins to the bottom of the keg. If that's your only keg, siphon to a sanitized carboy/...


8

1. Should beer be transferred to secondary for the purpose of dry hopping? If so, why? A lot of it is down to personal preference. If you're not doing a secondary for other reasons, then racking to secondary can be considered unnecessary. The main reason for doing a secondary solely for dry hopping is that racking from primary and avoiding trub is tricky ...


8

Yes, you should wait. The escaping CO2 will carry off the hop aroma you're trying to get through dry hopping. It's best to remove the beer from the yeast completely before dry hopping. There is an interaction between yeast and hops that can cause the hops to produce a very floral, rose-like ester which can be disagreeable.


7

OK, maybe this is a little weird answering my own question after I marked mdma's response as the answer. I want to share things I learned outside of the Exchange as a potential answer for future readers to consider. I listened to (most of) the Brew Strong podcast and took notes. My new understanding is that dry hopping is as much a matter of style as any ...


7

In my experience, dry-hopping is more important for aroma than flameout additions, unless you either go overboard with your flameout quantities or you do a hopstand. You may get a very slight bit more flavor out of a flameout addition, but my palette can't detect the difference. During fermentation, the CO2 will carry a lot of the aroma with it as it ...


7

I think the primary factor would be how much you're dry-hopping with. More hops means more of the volatile aromatic compounds that produce those aromas. Most of the recipes I've seen call for somewhere from 1 to 4 ounces of hops in the fermenter but I've heard of people using as many as 10+ ounces for dry-hopping. I'm not sure how that matches up with what ...


7

In addition to the other answers which I agree with. Late boil additions are very important too at last 1-5 minutes or whirlpool. These add a "deep" aroma for lack of a better term. They seem to bond to the wort at this temp and hang on through fermentation. Dry hopping in early fermentation while does add aroma and flavor tends to have much of it blown ...


7

If you are worried about the yeast getting through that bag, you have nothing to worry about. When we talk about sterile filtration, the generally accepted size of the filter is .45u (micron). 1000 microns = 1 millimeter. While the mesh on that bag is less than a millimeter, it's not even close to .45u. I don't think that most breweries even sterile filter ...


6

Joe's answer is great and I would rack to a new keg if all else fails. There's something simple to try first: bleed off almost all the CO2 in the keg then blow out any hop material in the beer dip tube by connecting the CO2 tank to the beer out line. (You can put the CO2 connector to the beer out post on corny/firestone kegs, don't know about pin lock kegs.)...


6

I don't use hop bags anymore (unless in the keg!) but when I did, I usually tied a piece of dental floss to the bag. I would whipe the floss with 70% Isopropyl Alcohol first, I'm sure your sanitizing agent will do the trick. Use glass beads as weights, sink the bag to where you want it, leaving the floss hanging out the top and insert the bung/ stopper! The ...


6

I usually just boil the hop bag and string for a couple of minutes. I've not used dental floss - I'm not sure that fresh minty taste is needed in the beer. I use starsan for pretty much all my sanitation duties, but my reservations about using starsan here are that it may not penetrate deep into the material of the hop bag, but really this is probably ...


6

If your recipe is written as one once by weight, which I can't think of any reason why it shouldn't be. You should be fine with dry hopping and late additions. So as long as the pellets are the flavor you are going for you should be fine. I dry hop all the time with pellets and I don't use bags or strainers and I get excellent flavor and no haze problems.


6

If you do this you should soak them in a little bit of vodka - effectively making a tincture. There are three reasons why: control: The alcohol will leach the essential oils and you can add the tincture a little bit at a time until you reach the flavor you want sanitation: Juniper berries especially can be used as a fermentation starter as they have a ...


6

The oils aren't produced from dry hopping, the oils are in the hop cones themselves. Its the stuff in the lupulin glands of the cones that contains the oils. I usually see the oil floating on top of the beer in the carboy. But that likely isn't the only place the oil goes. Its pretty sticky stuff and a lot of it sticks to the yeast, proteins, trub and ...


6

It's not contradictory so much as it's all valid. :) To answer the titular question: yes, you can dry-hop in primary. Long-term aging is really the only reason to rack to secondary. Dry-hopping, fruit additions, &c. can all happen in primary just fine. Anything that happens w/in 6 months can happen in one vessel (primary) or two (primary and secondary).


6

In my opinion a "secondary" should be viewed as a tool. A potentially useful tool, but best used by someone who really has a grip of their brewing process and using it for a very specific purpose. I agree with Palmer, dont chase what the big brewers do, they have different issues then homebrewers. I would definitely suggest dry hopping in your primary vessel ...


6

What your describing is volcano bottles. Over carbonation This is caused by bottle conditioning with too much priming sugar, too much residual sugar or wild yeast infection. Priming sugar misdose is easily prevented with proper measuring. Residual sugar is prevented by taking final gravity readings to make sure fermentation is complete instead of a ...


5

The instruction to add hops to the carboy is a little unusual, but if you think about it, its kind of like a post-chilling whirlpool addition, so its not totally unheard of. You will loose some delicate aroma through off-gassing during fermentation, and since its only .75oz total, I doubt this addition will contribute much to the finished beer. Some folks ...


5

There is nothing special about the style. The best time to dry hop is … immediately before serving, ultimately. Hops fade as a function of time, so minimizing the time between introduction and consumption is key. E.g., if you want to age/condition your beer for 3 weeks post-primary before serving, and want to dry hop for one week, you should introduce the ...


5

I've had bitter hop flavor come from dry hopping as well. The quoted text from the OP makes sense to me: Dry hopping is essentially creating a tincture. Don't believe me? Drop 3 grams of a high alpha hop in a liter of vodka and come back in a month, chose something fruity and popular like mosaic or galaxy. 3 grams is toughly equal to 2 oz in a 5 gallon ...


5

Nylon is usually pretty safe to put into beer. You should wash them and sterilize them before putting them in the fermentor. If you boil them that should do the trick, and so long as there aren't any holes after boiling should be fine to use.


5

Regarding essential oils for flavor and aroma, pellet hops typically have less than whole leaf hops due to processing, so you may want to add a touch more. This BYO article on dry hopping techniques says Since pellet hops are more highly processed than plugs or loose hops, there is some concern that volatile oils are lost. When using pellets for dry ...


5

The color is just from the oils of the hops, likely discolored further from extended use and boiling. You sanitizing it by boiling it will kill off most unwanted bacteria from settling in. If you're worried that it'll get too grimy, weight it down into an Oxy-Clean or PBW solution for 24-48 hours, taking it out periodically to scrub it and rinse it before ...


5

I cold crash (and fine with gelatin) at 30F for two or three days before kegging. I have found that 30F for two days clears my beer better than weeks at 38F in my refrigerator. If you plan to bottle the beer, you might fear that you'll drop too much yeast out, leaving you with too little yeast to carbonate the beer. That isn't a concern. Plenty of beer has ...


5

Apparently it means to add to Fermentation Vessel as you noted. https://www.brewdog.com/lowdown/blog/diy-dog I'm guessing it means in the primary, as most dry hops are in secondary. This would be the similar as a whirlpool addition, but have more rest time and hop trub for the primary. Edit After more review of the other recipes. FV would be in the ...


5

From my experience thesquaregroot got it mostly rigtht - fresh hops and sufficient quantity. There is one more really important factor. As far as my experiments go, 4 days before adding hops and bottling are optimal. Any more or less time means less aroma - it either didn't dissolve in your beer yet, or already started to evaporate. And never, ever dry-hop ...


5

This is really a question would take a book to answer completly. I'll try to hit the main points. Yes. What hops are added to does change aroma and flavor. Because of the blending of everything. (Balance of a beer) Specifically alcohol with hop flavor and aroma interactions all have good aspects in wide ratios. Alcohol "heat" tends to make hops bite a ...


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