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7

You essentially have four options: 1) Use a blow off tube. Advantage: Easy to do. Disadvantage: You risk losing some beer. 2) Find a bigger vessel. Advantage: No beer lost. Disadvantage: You need to find a bigger vessel. 3) Use a foam suppressor like Fermcap. Advantage: You'll lose less beer than with a blowoff. Disadvantage: Some people don't like ...


6

Kraeusen, airlock activity and other signs of active/inactive fermentation are not reliable indicators of when to bottle. You should bottle only based on gravity readings - that the gravity is unchanged for 3 days and is at or close to the expected final gravity. A persistent kraeusen is quite common for wheat beers, and so not surprising your Honey Weizen ...


5

You actually have observed the most important sign of active fermentation, which is the kraeusen. Guarantee you've got a leak somewhere in your fermenter causing the airlock not to push. It's rarely worth judging the state of fermentation based on airlock activity anyway, as it's often very likely to lead you wrong. In conclusion: you're fine, do not chuck ...


5

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


5

Most probably, it's some hops residue. The krausen must have caused it, and in any case it's not touching the wort so I would not worry about it.


5

All humor aside it should clean easily with mild soap and water. I've found that dish soap 1:20 ratio in a spray bottle does well on latex paint for all kinds of mishaps. Don't use soaps with bleach. Test a small area for discoloring, but allow to dry before you decide. My paint does change color when wet but returns to normal once dry. Spray and let soak ...


5

During fermentation a thick layer of brown, gunky foam forms on top of the wort and sticks to the walls of the fermenter. This layer is known as the Krausen (from the German word "Kräus" which means "curly" or "frizzy"). This is why the high growth or attenuation phase is also sometimes also referred to as "high Krausen". Even if no bubbles can be seen to ...


4

I'd leave it overnight and give it more chance to work. Just because there is no activity in the airlock does not mean it's not fermenting


4

Few tricks for temporary fix. Swirling every so often can get kausen to drop back in. Nitrile glove with a pin hole in a finger will work for a DYI air relief cover, should limit the mess. Latex will work too but not recommended due to their odor.


3

You're right that dead yeast is a good nutrient for live yeast. The growth medium used for yeast in the lab is YE (yeast extract) plus some sugar. This plan will probably provide some nutrition to the yeast, and work out OK for a few batches, but I think that problems will crop up. You won't actually make yeast extract. Yeast extract is made inducing '...


3

You could do either of your suggestions, or if your carboy fits in a bucket, just let it overflow through the airlock until the blowoff tube arrives.


3

"The best way to obtain yeast is to skim it from the krausen of a currently fermenting beer." -John Palmer, How to Brew It may be tough in the jugs your are using but taking some of the krausen is the best way to get the yeast. Source http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-8.html


3

There is no harm on having the blow off tube. You could use it during the whole ferment If you want. As for avoiding it, the only ways are to use a bigger vessel as you said, or make less beer.


3

It's prolly normal and I doupt this foam comes from starsan. I get bigger reaction when my fermentation temperature is high and/or OG is high and/or yeast produce big krausen


2

The original gravity reading was probably low due to insufficient mixing. Unless you stir the wort vigorously for a good while, it will stratify with sugary wort at the bottom and thin wort at the top. See this question for more details about why your starting gravity might be low. The final gravity reading is probably correct. Did you taste the beer ...


2

It looks like yeast cake because that is what it is. The yeast clumps together, and settles to the bottom as gets near the terminal gravity. That is called "flocculation", and some strains are much more prone to it than others. If you go to the manufacturers web site, they usually give a rating: low, medium or high. With the high ones, sometimes it is ...


2

You need to know if its done fermenting. Check with a hydrometer. You should taste the beer too. If it isn't done fermenting there may be several undesirable flavors present (unfermented sugar, diacetyl, acetaldehyde, sulfur to name a couple) It is possible depending on the yeast that the krausen just didn't drop and its done. I wouldn't try to stir it ...


2

You're going to have to take a gravity reading in order to determine whether or not fermentation has completed. It clearly did ferment given your description of events, but now it becomes a question of how much, and whether or not it has completed. I suspect you may have under-pitched despite using a yeast starter, which would cause an extended ...


2

Slightly cooler pitch temperature and keeping the fermentation temps under 80F will keep the violent krausen to a minimum. This used to be a problem for me and cooler pitch temps have resolved this.


2

Given the color and location, it's most likely hop residue. Pellets end up disintegrating into mush, hence the use of hop spiders / muslin bags. What yeast are you using that ran through fermentation that fast?


2

In addition to Franklin's answer, I would also say that if you are seein an active kraeusen with no airlock activity this early in fermentation it is fairly likely you may have a leak in your fermenter. Not knowing what you are using, I can tell you this has happened to me with plastic buckets. You should check your seal and make sure you have a good tight ...


2

It is hard to predict the krausen size, as it depends on many factors such as the temperature/speed of fermentation, number of yeast cells pitched. Depending on the fruit, it can create a big krausen, read this: Fruit mead - VERY vigorous fermentation Make sure to clean the fruit skin to avoid contamination. Mixing fruit with mead will work, you can ...


2

Have you considered using FermCap? It will reduce the Krausen without hurting the beer.


2

The foam you are talking about is normally called "kraüsen" (mostly) or "barm" (sometimes, UK). The sediment at the bottom is excess yeast and trub that has dropped out of your beer. Even if a fermentation is going on for a longer time, this layer will form, so do not worry about that. Looking at the picture, I see that you had a very vigorous fermentation. ...


2

No. You didn't kill your cider, this description sounds like a perfectly normal fermentation. Generally a yeast fermentation is vigorous in the first 1~7 days (typically producing a krausen), this phase is known by the term "primary fermentation". The time taken can be significantly different depending on temperature, sugar-concentration, amount of yeast, ...


2

Not particularly worrying. If temperature is under control and yeast amount is right, then head space as others say - as well as using a blow-off tube rather than a traditional air lock.


1

You could remove the cap and tape a piece of foil or plastic wrap partially over the opening. I’ve done this with Saisons to prevent back pressure stalling fermentation.


1

First off, it sounds like you're talking about step-propagation, not kräusening (which is adding actively-fermenting beer to end-fermented beer to induce a true secondary fermentation). I find the issue here a bit vague, because you don't mention whether you're comparing pitching the same number of cells in both cases (one actively fermenting, and the other ...


1

Many factors: Was the 2nd yeast of the same lot code?! Yeast is finicky and may simply not react the same way twice if anything is even slightly different in your mix. Was the malt extract exactly the same as the 1st batch? Dry vs. liquid, fresh vs. 2 years old? Anything different in how you prepared additions like Chrystal malt, etc.? Any differences in ...


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