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The answer is that the active ingredient, carageenan, is said to denature by hydrolization at low pH (especially if combined with high temps) before it has gelled, but it is hard to find citeable sources on the Internet. Carageenan typically comes from seaweed, including the commonly-named Irish Moss. Most forms of carageenan are not soluble in water at ...


4

I have some that is about 16 years old. I added it to a test sample of mead (the dregs that were left over after moving the must to a secondary fermenter). It clarified well and does not appear to affect the taste. I don't know how it will change with t


3

The flakes look a little large (this may or may not be a matter of perspective), but past that, I'd say it's perfectly fine to use. Add one teaspoon per 5-gallon batch at the last 15 minutes. Before adding it, I would suggest crushing it down just a bit further, either via a rolling pin, chopping, or using a coffee grinder (specifically re-purposed for ...


3

Brewing a hazy beer like that I normally skip the Irish moss anyway so I think you're going to be fine. Fining and the effect of flavor is beer style dependent... for the most part. In nearly all styles that are generally clear to brilliantly clear there isn't a lot of loss of flavor components from clearing/fining. In styles where some of the flavor is ...


3

From these documents: PDF1 PDF2 Store in cool conditions, away from direct sunlight Keep containers sealed when not in use Maximum storage temperature - 30°C Recommended storage temperature - 10 to 15°C Minimum storage temperature - Not applicable The shelf life at the recommended storage temperature is 2 years from date of manufacture Increasing the ...


3

The Wikipedia article on carrageenan outlines a number of peer reviewed animal studies, the results of which are mixed with some researchers claiming carrageenan poses no health concerns, while others assert that it promotes gastrointestinal tract inflammation and increased incidence of tumours. This study found no correlation between dietary carrageenan ...


2

If you brew extract, use 1/4 tsp. 15 min. before the end of the boil. If you brew all grain, use 1 tsp. for 15 min. Rehydration is not essential, but it will make it a bit more effective.


2

Adding irish moss too early to the boil will actually cause the coagulated proteins to break apart after binding together, negating the purpose of using irish moss. Ten minutes would be fine, but any shorter and you risk not giving the irish moss sufficient time to bind the proteins together. As an aside, adding irish moss will help with clarity, but ...


1

I am no scientist, but I would think that since Irish Moss is only used as a coagulant and precipitant in brewing that the amount retained in the beer after racking would be significantly less than say ice cream, where it is used as a gelling agent.


1

In my experience, Whirlfloc works better. I used Irish moss for my first couple of years, until I found Whirlfloc. The first time I tried it I was amazed at how clear my wort got. I chill by putting my kettle in a tub of cold water, and the visual effects of a Whirlfloc-treated wort when it hits about 25 degrees C are pretty cool. I've never seen ...


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