5

Yes you can take an ale recipe and use lager yeast at suggested temps. As for taste, it will depend on your recipe. Yes, the yeast imparts flavor to your beer, but, you can't make a medium body ale and expect a light lager at the end.


5

Clarity and poly-phenol/tannins pretty much nails it. Lager yeast do tend to be weaker flocculators than ale yeasts, so more time at cold temp helps clear things up. I brewed up an all Munich malt beer with German Lager yeast. It tasted so good after a 4 week primary that I kept drinking it during "lagering" and it was gone before the lager period was ...


5

Well first of all, you can't really turn around a 1.090 Lager in two months time (7/19 - 9/29). Its going to need 3 months of lagering minimum AFTER fermentation is totally done. So if you really want beer that's "more than good" for your wedding, then you need to brew a backup Ale right now that has a short maturation period. (I suggest a wheat beer, like a ...


5

Basically what you've described is cold conditioning an ale, a fairly normal practice. It allows the beer to clarify and smooth, the same way it does with a lager. There is no need to let the beer warm before bottling. There's still plenty of yeast in it, and the yeast will become active once you add priming sugar and let the beer sit at room temp to ...


4

Most extract-based lager kits are sold with an ale yeast. This is because most home-brewers don't have the equipment to ferment at a consistent low temperature. You could check the kit to make sure, but it's almost certainly the case that your kit makes a light ale, not a lager. I've had good luck in the past with WYeast 2112 (California Lager, equivalent ...


4

Don't bother with an airlock at that point. Just put some foil over the opening and hold it on with a rubber band. There's nothing outgassing at that point so there's no need for an airlock.


3

Absolutely! I've got a shed behind my house which I call "the lagering shed". You should know the range of temperatures which are likely to occur, and keep an eye on your beer. I live in south-western British Colombia, where winter temperatures are great for outdoor lagering. We sometimes go a bit below zero, but usually not much below, and usually not ...


3

I believe the Mr. Beer is a 1 gallon size and fits in most fridges nice. However most fridges work between 35-45°. Your target range for lagering is 48-54°F. With out electronic temp control, you will literally need to babysit the fermentation. But you may be able to pull it off with a simple temp strip on the fermentor. By placing it in and out of the ...


3

I would use a Cream Ale yeast, it's actually a blend of lager and ale yeast but ferments well at 65°-70°. Historically cream ales were made to compete with crisp American lagers. Many use California yeast (White Labs WL001) or similar for October style beers as it's about the cleanest of ale yeasts and has minimal esters when you use a larger than normal ...


3

Here's a quote from homebrewing.org... There are two important processes at work when a beer is in long-term cold-storage: Precipitation: Take a certain amount of liquid, warm it up, and you can obviously dissolve more solids into that same volume. Take that same warm liquid, and cool it down, and the amount of dissolved solids that it can contain ...


3

If you like the taste now, then there's almost no need for any kind of temperature gradient. Crash to as low as you can , e.g. 30F,-1C and let the yeast and chill haze fall out. Commercial breweries don't leave their lagers sitting around for months, it's just not necessary if your fermentation temperature profile is good.


2

Perhaps you have a leak in the lid of your fermenter. You should see some bubbles. If your hydrometer read shows that the beer attenuated, just make sure the lid is well closed and follow your normal fermenting schedule.


2

Put it in the basement the entire time. As we move towards winter, your basement should get cooler and that will help with the lagering. The optimal temp would be 50-55 °F, but you can run it a little cooler. The yeast will lag a bit and it just may need a blanket wrapped around it to get started, but it should ferment out fine in the end. As the ...


2

In a nutshell, if you want to maintain the same level of carbonation when raising temperature, then you'll need to increase the pressure applied. Similarly, when cooling, you'll need to reduce the pressure by venting some of the CO2 in the headspace. Although the CO2 pressure inside the keg will naturally increase with the higher temperature, the rate of ...


2

Its fine. There isn't anything magical going on. Its just cold temps and stuff falling out of solution to make clear beer and let the flavors develop. I find that most of my lagers taste great right out of the fermentor before I lager. If your primary fermentation was done correctly there almost isn't any need for an extended lager period on flavor. So ...


2

Lager and lagering are two seperate things. One is a beer type, and the other is a process. Of course you can lager in bottles! Lagering just means extended cold-conditioning. All lagers and some ales go through this process before sale and/or consumption.


2

Thanks Staros, for the link...But I think www.homebrewing.org answered it pretty well. Lagering - Chapter 3: Advanced Tips Bottling A Lagered Beer If you're planning on bottling your lager, then you should really consider putting it into bottles before you go into the secondary fermentation stage. There are two important considerations: ...


2

Lagering is done un-carbonated. The beer is left to clear in a cold (close to 0C) room for a few months. So, no, you can't lager a carbonated beer in bottles. BUT: you can bottle condition, and afterwards leave the beers for a few months in a cold area to allow the particles to settle out (what happens in the lagering process). The difference is that, ...


2

As long as you don't tip it over you'll be fine. Waves on top of the beer will not get to the bottom.


1

In my experience grassy notes come through when hopping at cold temps. I've tried to salvage some old IPAs with a cold dry hop and filtering with little success when they are at or below 55° while it kinda works, they have always gotten a grassy note flagged by at least one judge. For a lager the last real effective time for a dry hop is during your ...


1

I would simply dry hop before I started the lagering process. Do it in the bucket you are in with a sanitized sack. Then you can pull the sack and proceed with your lager phase. There might be some hop debris that makes it through the sack but it shouldn't be noticeable or a problem.


1

The primary thing that is happening is that stuff is dropping clear. The cold temp in combination with sitting still for extended time allows even the smallest of insoluble particles settle out of the beer. Secondary may be some yeast activity, but its very slow. I have made plenty of lagers and much of the yeast work is done before you do the lager phase....


1

Well I for one would never bottle before a week is through. I leave my brews in primary for 3 weeks. Not because it needs to ferment longer but because the beer needs to condition on the yeast. While your beer may be (and most likely will be) done fermenting after 4-6 days, to round out the flavor I would let it sit at least two weeks. Kit instructions ...


1

Any reduction in temperature will create a negative pressure (compared to what was before) in the fermentation vessel. The air lock is designed to work in a one-way fashion, so the only real risk is contamination of your fermentation chamber with air-lock fluid. Use a vodka in the airlock instead of starsan. In the extremely rare event that you generate ...


1

The Ranco and Johnson controllers are both solid controllers, and they will work just fine. I know guys that have used both of them, and the only thing I would recommend is that you buy a controller that will work for you as you make changes to your system. To that end, here are a couple recommendations: Buy dual stage - You may not be concerned about ...


1

Also when you drop the temperature quickly on a lager yeast they throw off more esters, because it stresses them. Giving the beer a more ale-like ester profile, which defeats the purpose of lagers. Jamil taught us that one.


1

I would agree that 1 degree/ day is unreasonable. Your wort in primary surely sees high temperature gradients just in it's self! 5 degree/ day sounds more reasonable like it's "keeping it safe". But in this case I agree with everyone. Crash that Okt!)


1

The purpose of lowering the temperature slowly is to avoid shocking the yeast, which might hibernate and fall out of solution. You want the yeast still (a little) active for the lagering phase. "Cold crashing", on the other hand, involves dropping the temperature dramatically to encourage the yeast to flocculate. I'm not a lager expert, but 1 degree / day ...


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