5

As a long-time practitioner of this method, I'd recommend waiting longer than this article suggests. For me, the real benefit of the technique is an accelerated reduction of diacetyl at the end of fermentation, since by the time esters have maxed out (more on that below) pretty much all other potential off-flavors (higher alcohols, acetaldehyde, sulfur ...


5

You're right on the common combination of pedio and brett due to diacetyl production. But pedio doesn't start working for 2-4 months, and has a time-frame of 4-9+ months. So you have plenty of time to source brett to add to help with diacetyl production from the pedio. I'm honestly not sure if a traditional lager-style diacetyl rest (probably with newly-...


4

Most bad esters are made during growth phase and early fermentation, it's only at the end of primary fermentation that you do your diacetyl rest, after the risks of undesirable esters has past.


3

Given their additional experiments of testing lagers fermented entirely at warmer temperatures, it would seem the answer is because the lager yeasts being used simply do not produce estery flavors or other off flavors at temperatures suitable for non-lager yeasts (60s and 70s). It would seem the lager yeast is what makes the difference between a lager and ...


2

He mentions it in the linked article: A few things we’ve learned over the last couple centuries of brewing is that yeast generally works slower at cooler temperatures and faster at warmer temperatures, most esters and phenolics are produced during the growth phase of fermentation, which in my experience lasts about 4-5 days for lager strains, and beer ...


2

At the beginning of the fermentation the yeast have access to some oxygen and/or stores of the metabolites made with oxygen. This allows them to replicate a few times, so naturally that's what they do. A byproduct of this is ester production, and other stuff (acetaldehyde, diacetyl, maybe some sulfury compounds, etc) that we usually don't like in our beer. ...


2

I'm not speaking from experience here, since I don't brew sours, but the yeast should reabsorb the diacetyl, just as it does in a regular ferment. The yeast will convert diacetyl into acetoin then 2,3-butanediol, which has much higher taste threshold than diacetyl. Both conversions provide energy, and so help sustain the yeast when other energy sources are ...


2

You may have picked the wrong yeast. I read somewhere I think it was from Wyeast, that all yeasts produce Diacetyl, but some yeasts are better than others at cleaning it up. So whenever Wyeast recommends a 'Diacetyl rest' for a strain, you should not use it to clean up Diacetyl. Instead I would pick a non English yeast that does not require a D-rest, which ...


2

You can certainly pitch the Brett later. As mentioned the Brett will help with diacetyl, but it also helps with the ropey dextrinous 'gunk' that Pedi starts to throw in there. Without Brett that stuff doesn't clear out very easily. You need Brett to break that stuff down.


2

You want to add some actively fermenting beer. There is a German technique called Krausening for just this purpose.


2

Looks just like a little bit rushed for the total schedule. It wouldn't have hurt the beer any to let it finish out at the warmer temp of 60F. Instead your data shows you started to chill it back down while it was finishing. In the future, take a sample and taste it before chilling to lagering temp. Take a sample and microwave it for 30 seconds and that ...


2

Butter is diacetyl. Yeast can eat it, so fortunately it ages out. Typically this will take 2-3 weeks in beer. I'm not sure how long in a ginger bug but my guess is similar timeframe. So just be patient, and give the culture time to eat it. Good luck!


1

The OSHA standard is an inhalation warning of pure diacetyl in air. You're measuring diacetyl in a liquid. Its very different saftey-wise. As long as you aren't aerosolizing your samples and inhaling it you're fine.


1

Short Answer: Oxygenation or Yeast Did you stir it enough to oxygenate the wort? Did you use enough yeast (you must have, sorry answered this one for you)? How did you store the yeast? Yeast age? Longer Answer: Diacetyl is made at the start of fermentation by the yeast and is absorbed towards the end of the fermentation. A brew that a weak yeast or ...


1

It's simply because esters are produced only during growth phase. Once yeast has consumed the oxygen this triggers the end of growth and into feeding phase. Seeing that the SG has reached 50% of TG is confirmation growth is done and feeding his well underway. So it's ok at this point to increase their metabolism with temperature. But not too warm or then ...


1

Being that it's a sour and you pitched bacteria, it's entirely possible that the diacetyl is a result of your purposeful "infection". I don't think there are any guarantees, but I do think it's possible that it will be at least somewhat reduced by the yeast.


1

My co author, Drew Beechum, is pretty much recognized as the master of saison. In our book "Experimental Homebrewing" he writes about 565 and how temprementl it can be. For one thing, you need to raise the temp into the 80s after the first couple weeks in order to get the yeast to finish. That will clean up a lot of the diacxetyl. Most surprisingly, it's ...


1

As long as your yeast is healthy and abundant and you're not cold-crashing the beer as soon as fermentation tails off, you'll be fine. I've fermented with a number of Saison and Belgian strains (though I can't remember which off the top of my head) and I've never had any problems with diacetyl. Also, basically any strain that's known to produce diacetyl in ...


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