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9

I give fermentation 4-5 days at 63°F, then bump up the temp to 70-72°F for maybe another 3 days. Then I crash to 33°F for 3-5 days until the beer clears.


7

I am not sure exactly what you are defining as efficient, so I am going to answer this assuming time efficiency is your primary goal. Denny's advice is good advice for a general approach without having to faff around checking things, and will ferment all but the largest brews to FG. I would suggest you take daily samples and gravity readings. As soon as ...


3

I think there are several reasons why cold crashing works, but they all come down to affecting various parts of the equation for drag (in other words, gravity is doing all of the work). First, cold promotes early flocculation of yeast. Yeast clump together and form flocs as a survival reaction to adverse environmental conditions, with cold being one of ...


2

IMHO the yeast is not dead but might be dormant. As has been asked in the comments above - there is no mention of priming sugar added to the brew before (or while) bottling. If the fermentation went to completion in the barrel then some priming sugar/malt will be needed to carbonate the beer in the bottle. If there was no sugar then there would be no ...


2

At the simplest level, cold crashing is about reducing any exothermic heat from yeast metabolism, since this causes convection and interferes with the sedimentation. Cold crashing temperatures can (and should) be a good deal cooler than serving temps. Despite what is common practice, most, if not all beer, be served above ice-cold temperatures to properly ...


2

If you have Argon, you can used it, however I do not think it is necessary, unless you have a lot of free space, like a half full carboy. Good, sanitation is much more important than air exposure. Mainly, because beer will not age as long as wine in a carboy, the process being shorter. I find beer much more resistent to air exposure compared to wine (my ...


2

I send an email to John Palmer, he has been kind enough to answer. I guess it is ok to post it here, so here it is: Hi, It's best practice. Lots of breweries cold crash, and they lose head retention as a result. Thermal shock is most prevalent on cooling, not heating, although it can occur then too. But the difference of 10-20F at pitching doesn't have the ...


1

I have never noticed a problem with cold crashing. In reality, it takes a while for the temperature to drop anyway (albeit not 1*C per day). If you are hoping to harvest the yeast, shocking them unduly could cause you issues, but otherwise, I would say crash away. If, in the future, you come across an issue that could be explained by insufficient yeast ...


1

Partly it depends on the yeast. Westmalle (WLP 550, Wy 3787) is notorious for flocculating in the middle of a fermentation if it gets too cold, and thereafter being impossible to rouse. At that point, re-pitching is the only option. It can also very easily take off and get too hot--I've had 80F+ with it. Water bath is the best bet for that yeast. But it's ...


1

The primary thing that is happening is that stuff is dropping clear. The cold temp in combination with sitting still for extended time allows even the smallest of insoluble particles settle out of the beer. Secondary may be some yeast activity, but its very slow. I have made plenty of lagers and much of the yeast work is done before you do the lager phase....


1

I think once you guys read any number of bio papers like Mechanisms of Yeast Flocculation: Comparison of Top- and Bottom-Fermenting Strains, by PASCALE B. DENGIS, L. R. NE´LISSEN, AND PAUL G. ROUXHET, you will realize that the mechanisms underlying cold crashing are probably actively regulated by yeast, and not passive processes. I mean you are dealing with ...


1

Temperature at its core is a measurement of particle velocity. The colder something gets the slower the particles and atoms are moving. When you cold crash you are slowing down the nano-scopic movement of all these particles (macro and otherwise). The less they collide with each other and the slower the move, the more effective gravity is at pulling them ...


1

Cold Crashing clarifies cider by causing the yeast to clump together, or "flocculate." These clumps of yeast then fall out of suspension much faster than individual cells (due to some fluid dynamics that I won't pretend to understand). Flocculation depends on many factors, chief among them, yeast strain, but temperature plays a major factor. For the majority ...


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