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6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


2

"Pilsner enzyme" is different from other brewing or distilling enzyme. It's not derived from malt and is a exogenous enzyme. It can do the same job as malt enzymes but at lower temps and different pH. Allowing it to be added to the wort at fermentation to break down sugars the yeast can't use so they can use them resulting in a dryer beer. There is no need ...


2

As long as you have an oven, you can make that pils malt into toast/roast specialty grains and go wild. See some suggestions by John Palmer to start and take it from there. http://howtobrew.com/book/section-4/experiment/toasting-your-own-malt


2

With only pilsner malt*, your options are pretty limited, but you are not helpless. Pils, of course What else would you brew if you have only malt designed for it? If you can keep low temperatures, go for it! With access both to saaz and German hops, you can try both German and Czech varieties. Pale Ales can work as well Pilsner and pale ale malts are ...


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink them....


2

I'd rack it into a secondary for the sake of cleanliness in the final product. Especially if you were to coldcrash it before bottling. Cheers and best of luck!


2

Lager yeasts generally need lower temperatures. They will also ferment at higher temperatures (they don't die), but the resulting beer may have serious off-flavors. I doubt that you'll get terrible off-flavors at 17C already, though. In your case, where you only have to cover ~10C, I'd look into alternative methods of temperature control, for example, ...


2

You want to add some actively fermenting beer. There is a German technique called Krausening for just this purpose.


1

The grain absorption in brewing is generally about a litre per kilogram of grain, so this part looks good. My strike water temperature is generally around 74°C for a 66°C mash. If you're aiming for a cooler mash, this sounds good. It's also very dependant on the ambient temperature, and equipment involved. You could always add a bit of heat to bump it up....


1

I just made a Czech Pilsner at a little higher temp. Once it finished fermenting I racked it off the trub into an sanitized secondary that would fit into my frig. I let it get very cold, then added gelatin to further clear the Pilsner. I let it sit for a week or so in the frig, it got very clear. At that point I racked it into a keg and I let it lager for ...


1

For a 24L batch of extract lager beer I often use this recipe. It can be modified as wished but it gives a guide to what can be done. The hops can be changed for any similar amount of "nobel hops" but this mix gives a light clean hop taste and mild aroma. 40g Hallertauer-Herbrrucker boil for 45 minutes 15g Tettnang boil for 15 minutes 2.5Kg extra pale ...


1

I suppose that outside of the US, Pilsner and/or lager malt is the one with the most diastatic power. Here in Europe, 6-row is not malted for the brewing industry, it is only used for cattle food. Edit: just to make it more clear, I suppose that it is called Pilsner enzyme, because it is used as a replacement for Pilsner malt, in cases one needs or wants to ...


1

I was brewing a Pale Ale. When I was putting it in a carboy, it had red-brown color. After 3 weeks it became pale. So, it will become lighter with time. Just let your yeast do the job.


1

With the grain percentages you listed, I wouldn't be surprised if it's darker than 9 SRM. Adding 2-4% roasted malt is a common technique for giving Red Ales their deep red hue. Color is also notoriously difficult to predict accurately and can vary depending on caramelization in the boil, the batch of malt, tannin extraction during sparging, and even hops. ...


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