Hot answers tagged

7

They are slightly differently sized. In particular, the grey gas fitting will fit over the "out" post, but the black liquid fitting will not fit over the "in" post without significant pain. But, yes you should treat them as the separate things they are.


3

I'm guessing you are thinking of getting a small bar fridge, then turing it over so the opening points to the ceiling? Honestly I am not sure that would work at all. You would need to chill the keg for at least three hours in a completely sealed fridge and with the door open it might take much longer or maybe not even work at all. I see two options which ...


3

IMHO the answer is a both. The CO2 from the bulb contributes to carbonation in that it keeps a atmosphere of CO2 over the beer and keeps it under slight pressure. It also a prevents a partial vacuum developing above the beer while its being poured from the keg. Without a CO2 bulb supplying the CO2 to fill the keg, one would have to admit air to allow the ...


3

If you plan to consume all of the contents of the keg within a couple of days to a week, this may be a possibility. Using oxygen to tap a keg of beer causes the beer to stale exponentially quicker than regular CO2, even more so in cold temperatures. I would advise against doing this unless you plan to have it all drank in one sitting at a party. Depending ...


3

It is absolutely fine, bit of extra head space isn't going to cause any harm, or give any magical benefits. Just means you'll have less beer.


3

Why not build a hose that goes from the Sanke fitting to the liquid side of your Corny? I'd use CO2 at the lowest pressure that you can to get the liquid to move. Otherwise, use a growler filler with a tube that is long enough to reach the bottom of your corny keg and treat the corny as a growler. When you get home, connect as usual.


2

It's not a problem. Runs the risk of oxygen exposure to finished beer if not filled properly, but It can be done at the cost of co2, which is very minimal. Personally, I purge starsan from the keg using co2 and fill the corney from the outlet port, so there is no air exposure regaurdless of how much beer im putting in. You will force carb more quickly. If ...


1

If you have kegs, why not just use CO2 to carb it? That's what I do.


1

I think you will have problems trying to keep the keg cold, and this will be terribly inefficient: The temperature of the beer in the keg will tend to equalize, and so the exposed keg will constantly be warming the beer as the refrigerator tries to cool it. Have you considered a jockey box? For short periods of time, they are very effective at chilling beer ...


1

Liquid nails or rubber cement would work nicely. Make sure that you remove the 'boot' and remove all of the old residue that may be stuck on. I would probably run some coarse grit sandpaper over that afterwards just to create a rough surface for the cement to bind to. That isn't necessary but make sure you clean the area at least.


1

I've heard liquid nails does a nice job.


1

I've heard of people using the adhesive for car mouldings to do this. They said its available at most autoparts stores.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible