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5

You've made sugar wine, called kilju in Finland. It's also the precursor to rum, which is distilled from a wine made from sugar cane juice or molasses. It's safe to drink, but to everyone's taste.


3

Ball valves should work fine. However consider: Turbulence causes CO2 to come out of solution. Faucets are designed to minimize this effect whereas ball valves may not. Ball valves will be difficult to clean and can harbour spoilage organisms. Faucets have fewer places for such to hide and are easily disassembled. That being said, give it a shot and see ...


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


2

I have always preferred the Chrome Ferrules over the brass inserts. For one it is easier to install the ferrules correctly. The inserts can sometimes go in a little bit crooked which really throws it off and then the handles is pretty much done fore. With the ferrules it's just a matter of drilling a smaller hole and screwing in the bolt. Also I find ...


2

Well the active ingredient in PBW is 30% Sodium Metasilicate and the rest composed primarily of percarbonate (Oxyclean) and sodium bicarbonate. So the recipe you link to directly is not the same (which isn't to say it isn't a good cleaner). No access to iodophor? As to sanitizer. My suggestion and goto when I don't have starsan is to use a 2 tbsp Bleach, ...


2

I would use a single 50ft stainless coil and then purchase the smallest cooler I could find that would house the coil and still have room for ice. I don't know anyone that has used a coil smaller than 50ft a 25ft coil may be sufficient but I can't say for sure. Good luck.


2

The Brewer's Association has the excellent Draught Beer Quality Manual freely available as a PDF (see the upper right corner of the page for the download). It discusses what you'll need to account for: both line length/resistance/elevation change calculation for balancing serving pressure, and long-draw cooling options (forced-air or glycol).


2

Standard plastic 'cobra' or 'picnic' faucets are fairly cheap. They won't mount to the side of a jockey box but if price really is the primary issue then at least these work. You can drill a hole and pass the tubing through them. The hole can then be used for a proper faucet in the future. I think some of the other non beer related options will create ...


2

For getting an optimal pour, you're best to go with a beer faucet. For the best flow with the least amount of foam, the tap should be fully open, or it will agitate the beer causing lots of foam. Other taps may have too small an opening, causing the beer to gush out or be agitated. There's also aesthetics - the beer taps have been engineered to look good, ...


2

One reason why you can generally brew without sanitizing equipment is that you are deliberately putting a lot of yeast cells into the brew. So they start with a high population advantage and that allows yeast mostly to out-compete any non-yeast contaminants. Another reason is that yeast is successful because the yeast cells tend to clump together with ...


2

Sanitation can be important, more so if one runs a factory that must hit output targets and timetables. But sanitation can be over emphasized. One wonders how the ancients struggled to make wine without StarSan. However it is perfectly possible to ferment and ferment well without "chemical sanitisers". Boiling water is a very effective sanitiser and just ...


2

There is always the risk of an infection. You need to sanitize any equipment that comes in contact with the juice with starsan or another sanitizer. I would not use dish soap. I would even spray the yeast packet and the scissors used to open the yeast with sanitizer and put a little sanitizer in my airlock. This is a small and simple step to take and will ...


2

First this: How to Brew: Brewing Metallurgy Apparently, there should be no problem in using a copper chiller in your fermenting beer. Make sure there is no oxidation before you use your cooler.


1

Do you use picnic taps? Every time the lid is opened, warm humid air is allowed to enter, cool, and result in condensation on surfaces. If this is the case, the standard mounted shank & faucet type taps should reduce the amount of times that the lid is opened and thus, reduce condensation.


1

Similar to you, I am based in the UK, in the north. Specifically, near Leeds. The proposed aluminium insulation foam might work. I don't know. Never tried it as there are no means of preventing the heat from building up if it gets too hot. For not too much money you can create a temperature controlled setup. You need 3 pieces of kit: Brewbelt. Inkbird ...


1

Beer has a relatively low pH, usually around 3-4. As it's acidic, it can be more reactive with certain materials. Chrome-finished faucets, in particular, will over time have the chrome finish stripped off. As well, faucets need to be cleaned regularly, so the ability of the material to stand up to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning is important.


1

Start with the coil and build the box around that. How would you build the box? I'd build it out of 1/4 inch plywood (sometimes called Luan or underlayment) in 2 pieces, so that one will fit inside the other with a foam core in between. Then, fiberglass the inside of the inside one and the outside of the outside one, covering the gap. drill the hole for a ...


1

I would say the most important thing is a well-drilled hole. Scrappy, poorly-drilled holes make it difficult to fit the component parts in and can make it possible for bacteria to collect between brews. Often you'll be hooking some kind of hose to the outside of your valve, so gravity will do the work. I think for tightness-of-seal you're right - you ...


1

If you're going to go to the effort of including an arduino in the system, then it would be a good idea to also use that for temp control with a more sophisticated algorithm. The Johnson controllers use simple thermostat algorithm which overshoots on heating or undershoots on cooling, simply because they switch on or off when the setpoint is reached, but ...


1

If vinyl isn’t the gold standard for homebrewer’s tubing, I don’t know what is. It’s good to ~170° F max. As Tobias mentioned, silicone tubing is used for higher temp transfers. Purchase anything anywhere “Food Grade” and you’re good-to-go for low-temp homebrew, but I wouldn’t get too creative with random hardware store DIY bric-a-brac without the “Food ...


1

I made a few from different scrap pieces of wood and bought some chalk tape. I found the hardware at Lowe's. Check out my blog for pic and details.


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