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8

At beer pressures, a keg cannot explode. It's designed to take much more pressure - rated to around 120-130 psi. Even at failure, the seals will fail rather than the chamber itself. Failing at standard beer pressures will be as a leak (pinhole or crack). Which isn't to say they can't explode. It's a sealed pressurized vessel - so it could explode or implode....


7

I can think of a couple reasons. One is that the beer is over carbonated...maybe not literally, but it indicates your system may be out of balance. The other reason would be if you had a long line from the keg to the tap. The line is warmer and the CO2 comes out of solution in the line.


6

Your general understanding is pretty much spot-on. I think the thing to consider here is that your reasoning assumes that half or a third of the priming sugar is meant to yield the same amount of carbonation as it would in the bottle. I'd argue this isn't the case. Notice how recommendations like this keg-underpriming 'common wisdom' usually don't go so far ...


6

You only need multiple line regulators if you want different beers at different pressures. I think 90+% of people just dispense their beers at the same pressure. Hence, they only use one regulator. If having a very bubbly Belgian Tripel and a softly carbonated English Mild on draft side is something you MUST have then two different line regulators becomes ...


6

I don't have all the math in front of me but a typical beer freezes in the mid 20's Fahrenheit. Lower alcohol might be 27F and higher might be 24F. There are a lot of different factors like the volume of liquid and wind and the alcohol. I would think that if you left a full keg out overnight and the temperatures dipped into the upper teens, you'd probably be ...


5

I've done just this for my last 30 batches or so. It's lovely, and I see no reason to go back. I fill the corny to the weld line, bubble some oxygen up through the liquid diptube, and then connect my spunding valve to the gas connect. The spunding valve is just a pressure gauge and an adjustable pressure relief valve attached to a 1/4" stainless tee. To ...


5

Look into "spunding valves", either to buy or DIY. Often used for natural carbonation, but it could be used to control primary fermentation pressure, as you suggest.


5

As long as you aren't using air purged cask type "kegs" you'll be fine. Disconnecting a keg from the hook up seals the keg from the outside air, and contains the pressure already applied. Assuming you're using the proper pressure to dispense, the beer's carbonation level will remain the same. If the beer is unfiltered, or has been naturally carbonated, ...


5

As long as all of seals are good, it should hold pressure indefinitely.


5

Do you know what Biogon is? Great mixture of CO2 and Nitrogen. We use it in Czech Republic, but I do not know if it is available in the USA. CO2 keeps the carbonation, Nitrogen preserves it, so it is a great combination. I think it is called Mixed Gas in your country


5

By poppet do you mean the little springy thing inside of the keg post or do you mean the outer keg post itself? I'll try to answer both. I have ruined a few poppets by forcing them out with a screw driver and had to replace. The replacement poppets do not stick in as hard and normally fall right out. For cleaning I go with a long soak in PBW then StarSan ...


5

Keep an eye on Craigslist for a used refrigerator. You can often get them free or nearly free if you pick it up. That's all you need: take the shelves out, and you can keep your keg in there with a picnic tap. I did this for about 15 years in my basement. If you want to get fancy, you could get a kit to put a faucet through the side so you don't have to open ...


5

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


5

If you completely purge the keg of CO2 and let it sit for 10minutes and the beer pushes itself out with the regulator shut off then the beer is potentially over carbonated. If the beer was overcarbed a simple burp of the keg and setting to 10PSI doesn't fix it. There is still CO2 that has to come out. Multiple burps and rests are required. A spunding ...


4

Assuming you keep the beer under CO2 and purged the oxygen from the keg, it will keep quite a while. Several months at the very least, and it could be years. However, if you serve it "real ale" style without CO2 you are limited to a few days in peak condition.


4

1.) no need to keep the tank hooked up. The keg will retain pressure 2.) No problem 3.) yep. Just make sure it's tightly sealed! 4.) if there's no sediment in the keg, an hour or 2 will be fine. Otherwise, maybe overnight


4

I have a buddy who did this for several years before investing in a beer fridge. Its not ideal, but it works. The main difference to remember is that C02 becomes more soluble in liquid as the liquid drops in temperature, and less as it rises. So this means you'll need to push more C02 in to carbonate room temp kegs than cold ones.


4

No, it makes no difference - the CO2 is already liquid, and the difference between fridge and room temperature doesn't make any significant difference. When the CO2 comes out of the tank and converts to gas, it becomes much colder - again, significantly more colder than the difference between fridge and room temp. So again, no real difference. Where is ...


4

If primary fermentation is complete, adding priming sugar only allows the wort to consume the newly added sugar; it doesn't continue to ferment afterward. In a 5gal corny keg, 4 oz of corn sugar will be sufficient. You must leave it at room temp (just like a bottle) for a couple of weeks. It should carbonate just fine. (Akin to cask conditioning). You can ...


4

I've successfully made wine in corny kegs and had the wine keep for many years. I use Nitrogen to pressurize the keg, which doesn't dissolve into the beer and provides an inert atmosphere.


4

You MUST have the poppet in place. And it must be working properly. There are two poppets that work together. One in the post on the keg as pictured AND there is also one inside the beverage line disconnect. It is usually a clear like plastic nub. Both poppets are spring loaded, and need to push on each other to create an open path for liquid to flow. ...


4

Shandies (and Radlers for that matter) are beer cocktails from their respective home countries. A true shandy is a mix of light wheat or lager beer with lemonade and done in the glass. Companies like Miller are capitalizing by putting it in a bottle. The strip the yeast out of finished beer, blend with lemonade and then carbonate it on the way to the ...


4

Vaseline is petroleum based and will degrade black orings. Use food grade silicone spray to keep your keg seals fresh and lubricated.


3

K-meta alone will not. You need the one-two punch of Potassium Sorbate (to prevent the yeast from reproducing) and Potassium metabisulfite (to kill existing cells). Note that this will take a bit of time, so you should expect to see a bit more of a gravity drop in the mean time. Using cold to slow yeast growth at the same time is advised.


3

You simply need to stop the flow out of that end of the coupler. Pretty much anything you dream up that will connect with 7/8" 14 thread will work. If you have a local fitting place, ask for a cap nut, or acorn nut with that threading and you will be good to go. A search on eBay for "7/8 14 nut" had a few that fit the bill for under $5. A note of safety: ...


3

It's actually kind of difficult to use those kegs for serving, which is why you'll generally see homebrewers using 5 gal. keg for serving and reworking the 1/2 bbl. kegs into kettles. To use the to serve, you need to remove the ring and spear, clean them, and then fill them. You need to get the appropriate fittings for gas and serving. You might want to ...


3

The ideal keg size for a 23l batch is 23l or as close as you can get above that. You can use a larger capacity keg with no problems, but you will end up using more CO2, since you have to pressurize a larger volume. Using smaller kegs is also possible, but a bit of a pain since you have twice the work to do cleaning, sanitizing and filling, and again, the ...


3

Those are ball lock kegs. You can use PBW (or Oxiclean) to clean them and StarSan to sanitize. Common CO2 tank sizes are 5 gal. and 20 gal. 5 gal. are more portable if that matters to you. I use a 20 gal. and only need to get it filled once a year. Here is some excellent info on cleaning, maintaining, and using kegs.... http://web.archive.org/web/...


3

The current going prices for reconditioned kegs are closer to $60-70/ea on other sites, a bit less if you're willing to put up with cut handles or other minor deficiencies. $40/keg is a good deal. $12/keg is too good to be true. :)


3

I just worked on several kegs over the weekend. I normally only tighten them with a mild amount of strength. Wish I had a torque wrench to tell you exactly. I tighten by hand then maybe another 1/8 to 1/4 turn with the wrench. I am certainly not putting any of my weight on it. (As an aside tip, when I get one that's really tight, I'll lay the keg on its ...


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