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3

I don't think that this is going to work very well, stripping out the barrier between the freezer and the refrigerator. Any number of things could happen: You risk damaging the refrigerant lines that may pass between or go around the freezer portion, Unless you can disable the freezer, you may find it working extra hard to try and maintain the thermostat ...


3

Nope. ID really all that matters with respect to line-length resistance and system tuning. The OD does not matter, though it does make me question what type of material the tubing is … which would also affect line-length resistance…?


3

Ball valves should work fine. However consider: Turbulence causes CO2 to come out of solution. Faucets are designed to minimize this effect whereas ball valves may not. Ball valves will be difficult to clean and can harbour spoilage organisms. Faucets have fewer places for such to hide and are easily disassembled. That being said, give it a shot and see ...


2

I would use a single 50ft stainless coil and then purchase the smallest cooler I could find that would house the coil and still have room for ice. I don't know anyone that has used a coil smaller than 50ft a 25ft coil may be sufficient but I can't say for sure. Good luck.


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Original Source: BYO.com Balancing your Draft System: Advanced Brewing With: 3/16" beer lines Serving tap 2ft above the keg 5 PSI CO2 serving/dispensing pressure (high for some Homebrewers) A 2ft beer line would be a good starting place (but start longer you can always cut some off but you can't put back on). A matter of balance Calculating the ...


2

Standard plastic 'cobra' or 'picnic' faucets are fairly cheap. They won't mount to the side of a jockey box but if price really is the primary issue then at least these work. You can drill a hole and pass the tubing through them. The hole can then be used for a proper faucet in the future. I think some of the other non beer related options will create ...


2

For getting an optimal pour, you're best to go with a beer faucet. For the best flow with the least amount of foam, the tap should be fully open, or it will agitate the beer causing lots of foam. Other taps may have too small an opening, causing the beer to gush out or be agitated. There's also aesthetics - the beer taps have been engineered to look good, ...


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Serving using a submerged carbonation stone is less than ideal. It will stir up sediment that's usually undisturbed on the bottom of the keg. Also the sudden burst of cO2 will cause head foam in the keg. Cleaning that dried lacing from the keg won't be fun. I've never seen one that attaches directly to the normal gas port. Ideally the stones are attached ...


2

Commercially if the run is long they use pumps or push with beer gas (nitro blend) Lines are always cooled. Usually with glycol lines run along with the beer lines then insulated. Sounds like you have a pretty good grasp on what you need for a 10ft rise. It's not out of reach for pushing with cO2 if you tune the run with the right line. Flow control ...


1

You can't increase the carbonation without increasing the pressure or decreasing the temperature. Presumably the temperature is about right, so that leaves the pressure. It sounds like you need to check out some of the line balancing resources available. The basic steps for carbonating properly are: determine desired carbonation level Use maths or a ...


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They step down in size to help prevent overcarbonation at the end of the line. For when a keg is on a jockey box for several hours at above normal pressures. Beer flows easier and with less pushing pressure the larger the line is. The more diameter step downs to the final diameter at the tap the better. This is why you will see many jockey boxes start at ...


1

Beer has a relatively low pH, usually around 3-4. As it's acidic, it can be more reactive with certain materials. Chrome-finished faucets, in particular, will over time have the chrome finish stripped off. As well, faucets need to be cleaned regularly, so the ability of the material to stand up to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning is important.


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Start with the coil and build the box around that. How would you build the box? I'd build it out of 1/4 inch plywood (sometimes called Luan or underlayment) in 2 pieces, so that one will fit inside the other with a foam core in between. Then, fiberglass the inside of the inside one and the outside of the outside one, covering the gap. drill the hole for a ...


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