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5

I would advise trying to siphon first. You can use one siphon on multiple carboys. This is a much more economical option to making or converting multiple glass secondary fermenters to have a spigot. Of course, thus assumes that you have more than one brew going at once. As you're new, this is mere conjecture. However, if you plan on being both wine and beer,...


4

Well, here's my list of why it's a bad idea.... You will weaken the carboy and increase the risk of it breaking. You need to be able to keep the spigot sanitized throughout fermentation. Have you priced having custom carboys made? It's just unnecessary...siphoning isn't that hard to do. What you're looking at is dangerous, expensive and ...


4

Removing your airlock will most likely not ruin your beer, at least not right away. I remove the lid of my fermentor to take a specific gravity reading from time to time, and I never ruined a batch doing so. If I drop anything in my fermenting bucket, specialy at an early stage, I would use a sanitized spoon to take it out. Sanitize anything that will ...


3

You can place a spring over the bend and maintain visibility of that section of hose, or use a small section of a harder hose (such as garden hose) if visibility isn't important. If the garden hose diameter is too small you can slit it, or visit a gas station's dumpster (or ask) for a small section of radiator hose.


3

Your hands are filthy. DO NOT PUT THEM IN YOUR BEER. I say don't put a spoon in either. However big the risk of infection because of your lost o-ring, it's less than poking around in your beer. Plus the risk is probably minimal if the yeast have a good head start. The o-ring has already been in contact with the beer, so I would say that's that. ...


3

It is okay, and you didn't introduce any "bad things". More than likely, you have pitched a sub-optimal or basically-reasonable quantity of yeast into wort with very little dissolved oxygen, and the yeast are just having a very long lag phase. What was your pitch like (dry yeast? liquid? age? amount? starter?). What's the ambient temp of the fermentor? In ...


2

95F shouldn't kill your yeast, they usually live outdoors, without air conditioning. Depending on what strain it is, it may or may not make bad flavors due the warm starting temp. The big issue here is contamination: was the o-ring fully sanitized? Did your hands touch the o-ring? Is your air clean? Do you have pets? The safest bet would be to boil the ...


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


2

You're seeing air bubbles in the tubing because you're letting air in it somewhere (connections are the most likely place). If this is the typical vinyl tubing that I think it is, just get some more. Seriously, my local big box home improvement store sells 20 feet of the stuff for less than $8. You should replace if from time to time anyway.


2

Leave it until the batch is done. Your racking cane will still function, you just have to hold it above the trub. The tip only functions as diverter when the cane is held on the bottom of the fermentor, so it doesn't make a seal when held down. Update: use a paper towel soaked in sanitizer to make a seal. When held in place with firm pressure from your ...


2

I like this one. https://www.morebeer.com/products/sterile-siphon-starter-3-5-6-65-gallon-carboy-smooth-necks.html Because of the design simular to the one you linked, you can use very low co2 pressure to push the beer. This gives the added ability over pump type siphons to completely eliminate oxygen contact with your beer. This is very useful for ...


1

My personal attitude toward siphoning is that it is a completely unnecessary pain in the back. I ferment in buckets fitted with a tap. Siphoning carries a much higher risk of introducing contamination and oxidation. I have never seen the need for fermenting in carboys. They are expensive, difficult to clean, relatively difficult to handle when full, and ...


1

Good question. Due to ease of use, I like to use an auto siphon, although there is a small drawback. When the sediment blocking tip gets blocked by trub or hop debris, the inner valve starts sucking air in. However, I find it so comfortable to work with, that I haven't used another type of siphon in five years time. ...due to the risk of contamination and ...


1

After years I decided I hated spigots anyway and replaced even my spigotted plastic buckets with solid versions. No leaks, no problems. Syphon for the win!


1

If vinyl isn’t the gold standard for homebrewer’s tubing, I don’t know what is. It’s good to ~170° F max. As Tobias mentioned, silicone tubing is used for higher temp transfers. Purchase anything anywhere “Food Grade” and you’re good-to-go for low-temp homebrew, but I wouldn’t get too creative with random hardware store DIY bric-a-brac without the “Food ...


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