Hot answers tagged

10

It's fine to disconnect, or you can leave it connected. In fact, you have 3 choices: If you have a need to remove the CO2 tank now, you can do that, and connect up again 5 days before you need the beer. Alternatively, leave the CO2 connected now for 5 days to fully carbonate the beer and then disconnect. The beer will stay carbonated and will be ready when ...


9

One of three things: Incomplete fermentation prior to bottling... If the beer wasn't completely done before bottling residual sugar (plus priming sugar) is over carbonating the beer. Too much priming sugar. Re-examine how much you used. Consider that if the beer was significantly cool prior to bottling that a fair amount of CO2 would have been already ...


7

My experience has shown that going through the beer out line doesn't change the rate the beer carbs up. Whether using the 'set and forget' process, or the high PSI and shake method. The bubbles coming out the bottom really aren't increasing the surface ratio enough for it to be significant. The bubbles just rush up to the surface. The downside to the ...


6

If you have added approximately the right amount of priming sugar and your beer is not carbonated at all, your problem probably is not the amount of sugar added. A common problem is inadequate mixing of the priming sugar in the batch, but this doesn't apply here because you indicate that you added sugar to each bottle individually. Other potential problems ...


5

Don't pin it. This is a cask practice, but not necessary in your corny keg and will reduce the carbonation. In fact, you can prime it (fully sealed), wait 14 days, put it in the fridge and tap it in a few hours; the pressure built up during priming will let it flow, at least for a gallon or two. After which, if you can't put CO2 on it, prime it again and ...


5

You've made sugar wine, called kilju in Finland. It's also the precursor to rum, which is distilled from a wine made from sugar cane juice or molasses. It's safe to drink, but to everyone's taste.


4

One possibility is uneven blending of the beer and priming sugar solution. Did you mix the sugar/water solution yourself, or just let it mix naturally from the beer being racked on top? Depending upon how viscous it is, it can sit at the bottom of the fermenting bucket even though the beer is swirling. This means you end up with some bottles undercarbonated, ...


4

The other compounding factors are temperature changes and atmospheric pressure changes: as temperature changes the pressure inside the headspace will change, causing fewer if the temperature is lower or more bubbles if the temperature is higher to be released atmospheric pressure: changes in atmospheric pressure will cause more or less bubbles to be ...


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


4

Any way you take a sample (unless it's from a pressurized vessel with an outlet) will draw air in. As you suspect, it should be a small amount, and given that your beer A) may still be fermenting (which CO2 will help strip any introduced oxygen out of the beer) and B) definitely still has yeast in it (which will scavenge oxygen, as long as it's still alive), ...


4

In my experience, quick-disconnects such as this are entirely reliable for what you propose. In fact, it's more often than not that the hose barbs the QD's are connected to are what fails, rather than the QD's themselves. Safety-wise, it's no different than having anything else attached to the low-pressure side of your regulator. Anything beyond the on-off ...


3

'because I'm still getting extremely foamy pours two and three pours from the first, I don't think heat is the major cause of these problems.' I think you're right. If your fridge really is 32 deg. the foaming might be an issue of over-carbonation. Fully saturated, beer at 32 deg/12 PSI will be carbonated to 2.9 volumes (if you're dispensing with pure CO2, ...


3

It's not possible for CO2 to escape from the tap without pushing beer out as well. If there's a leak, it probably in the regulator, manifold, quick disconnects, or one of the kegs. Tighten all the clamps and connectors, and check your seals.


3

No, it's quite alright. CO₂ is heavier than O₂, and it's a very constrained pathway for O₂ diffusion. For just one day, it's totally fine. Heck, it'd probably be fine for weeks, honestly; even just a couple of PSI is nothing to sneeze at.


3

The excess foam is because there's too much pressure. There are two things I would try. The first is easy - turn off the CO2 and let the pressure in the keg push the beer out. If the sanke coupler has a release valve, you can use that to bleed off the excess CO2.* Once you have released the pressure and your problem should go away. Once it goes down, turn ...


3

You used the term "lagering", so if you are truly lagering, the answer is 'it depends'. If your beer is indeed a lager, then your yeast WILL be active....potentially down to freezing temperatures (if your yeast was treated kindly and your temperature lowering regimen was patient). I only make this point since things are moving very slowly at this stage and ...


3

It sounds like what you're doing is correct. (And I guess you've tried turning it all the way to the right - clockwise?) The relief valve can be quite sensitive on some regulators, causing it to fire a little prematurely, so it might have been that, but for the fact that you say the dial jumps to 60 psi. I would double check that the relief lock isn't ...


3

Generally: no; most homebrewer-scale fermentation and bright tanks are not rated for pressure, though it really depends on what sort of vessel you're using. Some people do ferment directly in a keg, and use a spunding valve to naturally retain CO₂ directly from the fermentation process, such that the beer can directly be served or bottled.


3

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


3

Most draft systems for homebrewers use just normal CO2. The beer gas of N2 and CO2 is used for 'nitro' dispense depending on the N2/CO2 ratio.


3

As brewchez stated it mostly for stouts with a nitro faucet in the homebrew world. But Beergas is preferred commercially if a tap run is really long. The Beergas allows them to push at much higher psi without overcarbonating beer along the way, for all styles of beer.


3

I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


3

Its not impossible to know how much CO2 is dissolved in the beer. There are tools for measuring it. Many professional breweries use these tools because have an exact carbonation level is important to them. As homebrewers we don't normally buy these tools so we can make random measurements. That said. It is well known how many volumes of CO2 are dissolved ...


3

looks good, nothing to worry about On the sides, that's just the yeast and other particles falling back in and getting hung up. I've noticed it on that style of carboy more than smooth wall styles. Also if using starsan with water with high minerals and it air drys leaving a surface that things can cling to.


3

It's only been one week? Wait another week before trying another bottle. It often takes 2 weeks to carbonate in my experience. If that doesn't work, maybe you didn't use enough priming sugar. You need about 2 tablespoons priming sugar per gallon for good carbonation.


2

The link to the tubing you posted says the tubing rating is 250psi, and a barb with a clamp would surely tolerate at least 60psi, but I don't think figuring out the maximum pressure the system can safely handle is the way to go. Instead, ensure that your adjustable valve has a maximum pressure so that it that opens when the pressure goes above a threshold ...


2

Getting metric to imperial is hard to find at the best of times. Finding one for a CO2 connector is going to be very unlikely. As gas connections are normally a speciality thread (often the opposite direction thread, turn clockwise to undo. This is so idiots don't try to screw a bolt in or something) Do a quick google to find the thread specs, and then ...


2

It's common to use 1/4" quick disconnect barbs and flange connectors (as shown in your photo) with a 5/8" gas hose. Just be sure to use either a worm clamp or oeteker clamp on the hose to keep it in place on the barb. Alternatively, you can get 5/8" barbs for the flange connector, but I'm not sure it's necessary.


2

Without knowing 100% what is available near you (saw that you are from the states which seems like a place where you can get almost anything from your local shop) there are hose-adapaters that you can buy, these are how they look in Sweden; Slangadapter. EDIT: After doing a bit of digging I found that they are typcally called 'Union Reducers' and can be ...


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