10

Easily put, chill haze is the result of haze-producing proteins that reside in the beer. They do not react unless chilled, at which point they clump together. At that point, they become visible enough to reflect light. Since the particulates are white in color, they give the appearance of haze. These proteins are slightly heavier than the beer, so given ...


6

Usually the biggest concerns of a slow chill are.... DMS (cooked corn flavor) is created from SMM when wort is hot. DMS will form until below 140°F (60°C). SMM is boiled off during boil, it's why we do an open lid boil. SMM has a half life of 37 minutes. 90minute boils usually reduce SMM levels below the perception threshold. Unwanted bittering late ...


5

If you are going to use a cube for No Chilling, I just don't see any reason not to follow the vetted No Chill doctrine of the Aussies, which says, very clearly "Do not be tempted to cool the cube prematurely". Hundreds of Aussie brewers pioneered this technique, and its "common knowledge" in that group that you can mess up and catch an infection in the cube ...


5

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


5

I start by saving the hottest water in my sink, to be used for cleaning the immersion chiller and other items post-brew. Once I have enough there, I save the water in buckets to be used for watering plants inside and out. Once the wort temperature drops to 120-130 F I switch over to a closed system. I have a small picnic cooler with a submersible pump in it, ...


5

It will always work, the difference is how much time we save or not. My 25' 1/4" wort chiller works better than I expected, 15 minutes to cool 5 gallons. Your 30' 3/8" should work very well, 15 to 20 minutes maximum I would guess.


4

You should be fine doing this. Don't aerate until the next day. For an added clarity benefit, if you are chilling all the way to pitching temp on brewday (or at least belo 130-140), you can 'decant' the wort the next day into a different sanitized fermenter and leave the trub behind. This can also help to aerate. FURTHER, this will also basically allow ...


4

Whirlpool hops and flameout hops actually have different meanings although the names do not explain them very well. In professional brewhouses, the "whirlpool" is a large vat where the hot wort is separated from the trub by means of whirlpooling. It is still hot at this stage and will last approx. 1 hour. Typical homebrew procedures call for the wort to ...


4

Plastics are a very controversial issue, and it is unlikely that we'll have a clear consensus on longterm safety anytime soon. Some plastics are unambiguously unfit for food use (especially at high temperatures), while others are likely fine. Generally speaking, the safest plastic container for no chill brewing would be a HDPE without plasticizers. If you ...


4

Ya know what? In reality, it just doesn't matter. I drop the same old funky immersion chiller I've been using for years into the wort. Then I take the output hose from my pump and clamp it to the side of the kettle, pointing kinda sideways below wort level. It's equally as effective as a friend's setup that's similar to a couple of your designs. Don't ...


4

The simple, easy way to get rid of chill haze is to cold condition the beer for a couple months.


4

Dissolving CO2 takes time. Area of contact between gas and liquid in bottle is really small. Thus, I doubt that few minutes would really help carbonate much. Of course, this is not totally pointless. By chilling fast, you can maximize time at optimal temperature. But use this as a step before putting bottle to fridge for a night, not instead. Last but not ...


4

I stop chilling my ales when the surface temp/outlet pipe is about 21 degrees C. It takes me about 40 minutes to chill 50 litres from boiling 100C down to 21C, so I guess in total I give the beer about an hour to settle after the boil is finished before draining into the ferm bins. Cheers!


4

I would oxygenate (pure O2) right before or after the pitch. Just because the process has the chance to introduce bacteria or wild yeast and it's best if the yeast is there to become dominate before anything else. Aeration has much less risk, if just splashing or shaking the wort. I don't think this would matter much when it's done.


3

In my experience, I never get a trub cone with the chiller in place. And I don't think you will. Too much turbulence as the wort whirlpools for a nice clean pot centered cone of trub. Of course the turbulence leads to great chilling via a great turnover of wort volume and surface area contact with the chiller. I only get a nice cone in a standard pot ...


3

Regular Polypropylene will release mild to moderate toxins at high temperatures. While Polypropylene (PP) is food-grade safe at room temperatures, and commonly used for containers (arguably safe for chilled wort according to comments in the previous link), the Energy Working Group gives it a "low" rating for overall hazard. My recommendation, don't use it ...


3

I can't comment on the safety of the material, but I can say that No Chilling does not really work if you try to drop the wort temps down before adding the liquid. When the wort goes into the tank, it is the fact that the wort is very close to 100C/212F that guarantees against infection while its sealed. The super-hot wort does a wet pasteurization of all ...


3

The downsides as far as I can see are (in descending order of severity) 1) Possible toxicity of the plastic. 2) Recipe alterations due to the continued elevated temps after the boil is over. 3) Risk for contamination. Right now, the current thinking is that "food safe", "heat resistant" HDPE plastics are OK for No Chilling. I am personally content enough ...


3

Seems like a good idea, especially if you tested it with boiling water it and it worked, and you sanitize it well. You would also want to make sure your siphon and tubing are all good for hot liquids. The only potential problem I can think of is that borosilicate glass (which I'm assuming is what your condenser is made out of) is very resistant to ...


3

No unless the 25' is the maximum submerged surface area possible. Even then a 50' half submerged would only function as 25' anyways. Half the length of tubing would never be twice as effecient of a tubing with same diameter and liner surface area. Ideally you will have as much submerged surface area as possible. That being said. If the temperature of the ...


2

I have a copper wort-chiller as well, but before I had it, I used ice to cool my beer. I would sterilize Pyrex glass containers, and put boiled-and-cooled water in them, and into the freezer a few days before brewing. I would put the pot in a sink full of cold water, and put the ice from the container into the pot (not the whole container). I just topped ...


2

I think it's just a matter of preference. If you rack to a carboy and store it cool, then the few microbes in the airspace will not cause too much trouble before morning. However, I personally feel that once the wort is ready to pitch it's preferable to pitch the starter then - even if it's only been stirring for 8 hours - since it ensures you have the ...


2

I liked the simple answer, it was very informative. The most fun way to get rid of chill haze is to pour the home brew into an opaque container, and drink it.


2

It comes down to your sanitation and process. You want to be filling those cubes hot. This means above 190ºF. This will, to a significant degree, sanitize the inside of the container and ensure that you'll be able to store it for a reasonable period of time. Many no chill brewers go for weeks or even months before pitching yeast.


2

Some brewers chill their wort overnight, using the No Chill Method, so in principle you could do variation of that, but use your fridge to get the wort chilled quicker. For this to work you need to ensure 2 things: The wort is above 180F so that it sanitizes the container. The container can be voided of air. The usual way is to use a squeezable cube and ...


2

It's a fine idea. The nice thing about the "traditional" approach is that the surfaces that touch the wort are exposed, easily cleaned, and can be inspected for cleanliness. Plus, as someone commented, you'll need a pump to move the wort through the IC, which is another complication and something else to clean. For a long time, I did something similar (and ...


2

It's related to both....given cold and warm temps and the same amount of time, the cold liquid will absorb more. Same temp, more time for CO2 to dissolve into solution, the one with more time will have better carbonation.


2

No that is not chill haze. It is a mixture of yeast, hops, and proteins that form from the hot and cold break. I agree it looks like you have some Starsan in your batch. I learned early swap the blow off tube for a airlock before you cold crash. Once active fermentation starts you will see all kinds of floating yeast and stiring going on. It's really my ...


2

Slowing down the stream might help conserve some (the water stays in the pipe longer and heats up more); but often people find a use for the water instead. One suggestion is to send your hose into a washing machine to pre-fill it. I use it to top up the garden pond. Yes it is very warm at the beginning but dilutes easily (no boiled fish!) as the pond is ...


2

Summary: Immersion chillers have diminishing returns on length. The first foot of tube does more work than any other foot of tube. The last foot does the least. An immersion chiller is a specific example of a device called a heat exchanger. As an engineer I took classes in heat transfer and heat exchanger design. Although I can explain exactly why ...


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