9

I always thought of this as being a HUGE no no. But I guess not...below is from John Palmer. People often wonder about adding ice directly to the cooling wort. This idea works well if you remember a couple key points. Never use commercial ice. It can harbor dormant bacteria that could spoil your beer. Always boil the water before freezing it in ...


8

You don't want to clean a copper chiller so it is shiny - if you remove the dull color (stable oxide), the metal is more likely to react and form the toxic blue-green oxide (verdigris). http://byo.com/stories/projects-and-equipment/item/1144-metallurgy-for-homebrewers Copper is relatively inert to both wort and beer. With regular use, it will build up ...


7

Plate chillers are generally regarded as being the most efficient, and so typically require less water for the same amount of cooling compared to counter flow and immersion chillers. The largest plate chillers from dudadiesel can chill a 10 gallon batch in 15 seconds according to their figures, but these cost over a grand, and they are using flowrates not ...


5

Assuming that you have cleaned and sanitized the ice packs, this should work. Are you stirring the wort while it cools? I find this helps a lot, especially as the temperature cools. Without stirring the cooled wort will sit over the chiller and the center of the pot isn't as effectively cooled. Sticking your kettle in an ice bath once you get to the lower ...


5

If you're chiller has garden hose adaptors on it you will simply want one of these: Faucet Adaptor I haven't seen too many of these at the hardware store, but they are a common item at most LHBSs.


5

This is how I do all of my brews. I usually boil about 11/12L for a 20/21L batch, put a filter over the primary bucket, pour the wort in from a bit of a height to help aerate, add ice until I get the right temperature then top up with water. The "right temperature" might be a couple of degrees above / below target, depending on whether the top up water is ...


5

It will always work, the difference is how much time we save or not. My 25' 1/4" wort chiller works better than I expected, 15 minutes to cool 5 gallons. Your 30' 3/8" should work very well, 15 to 20 minutes maximum I would guess.


4

Do you really need to dry it out? I just hook my "exhaust" hose up and let it do whatever it does when that water comes out. When I brewed in the kitchen, I used a piece of garden hose for exhaust (If I were doing this again, I'd cut a piece long enough to reach the sink) and captured the hot water that you're speaking of in a half-gallon container. ...


4

Turn the coil on its side, so that the coil is now horizontal rather than vertical, and then rotate in the direction of the coil, the water will eventually come out at the top. The water wants to fall to the lowest point, and so follows the path of the coil as you rotate it, eventually coming out the exit.


4

Ya know what? In reality, it just doesn't matter. I drop the same old funky immersion chiller I've been using for years into the wort. Then I take the output hose from my pump and clamp it to the side of the kettle, pointing kinda sideways below wort level. It's equally as effective as a friend's setup that's similar to a couple of your designs. Don't ...


4

I stop chilling my ales when the surface temp/outlet pipe is about 21 degrees C. It takes me about 40 minutes to chill 50 litres from boiling 100C down to 21C, so I guess in total I give the beer about an hour to settle after the boil is finished before draining into the ferm bins. Cheers!


3

In my experience, I never get a trub cone with the chiller in place. And I don't think you will. Too much turbulence as the wort whirlpools for a nice clean pot centered cone of trub. Of course the turbulence leads to great chilling via a great turnover of wort volume and surface area contact with the chiller. I only get a nice cone in a standard pot ...


3

Some people say that it's better to include the IC in your boil (if it's copper) as the copper gives off micronutrients (namely zinc) as well as providing a nucleation point which reduces the chance of boilovers. See Pennies in the Boil


3

Seems like a good idea, especially if you tested it with boiling water it and it worked, and you sanitize it well. You would also want to make sure your siphon and tubing are all good for hot liquids. The only potential problem I can think of is that borosilicate glass (which I'm assuming is what your condenser is made out of) is very resistant to ...


3

If you really want to get the water out, just blow in one end (careful not to pass out though!)


3

I would pass on that technique. Most ice packs I have seen have weird textured surfaces. There is also embossed lettering on them too. The likelyhood of actually sanitizing all though nooks and crannies is low. Unless you are talking about sourcing some uber smooth surfaced bottles and freezing them it might be worth a try on a few brews. I suggest you ...


3

I've heard most people shooting for ten minutes of chill time to get below that 60C mark. You're doing it better than that so that's cool (no pun intended). If you can agitate the wort around the coils you'll go that much faster. When I used an immersion chiller I used to pass my wort through a pump back into the kettle while chilling (recirculation ...


3

No unless the 25' is the maximum submerged surface area possible. Even then a 50' half submerged would only function as 25' anyways. Half the length of tubing would never be twice as effecient of a tubing with same diameter and liner surface area. Ideally you will have as much submerged surface area as possible. That being said. If the temperature of the ...


2

The best thing to do with a counter flow chiller is to make sure it is clean and drained completely before storage. I will usually run boiling water through the chiller to clean but you can also use PBW as long as you rinse it with warm water. Blowing it out with an air compressor will help drain the rest of the water. You don't want to store it with ...


2

I have a copper wort-chiller as well, but before I had it, I used ice to cool my beer. I would sterilize Pyrex glass containers, and put boiled-and-cooled water in them, and into the freezer a few days before brewing. I would put the pot in a sink full of cold water, and put the ice from the container into the pot (not the whole container). I just topped ...


2

I've seen pros store sanitizer in the plate chiller, just pump it in and cap it. Then when you push wort through, you simply wait for it to push the sanitizer out, as far as gross debris, PBW and some Really hot water does the trick for everything else.


2

After every 10 or so brews, I soak mine in powdered brewery wash (PBW), goes in with a rainbow of colors comes out looking like new. Plus, no elbow grease required.


2

As long as it isn't rusted and/or leaking, you're probably fine. If it were me, I'd take some polish to it and make sure to rinse it thoroughly afterwards just to be certain. You may not have to, but my perfectionism would scream at me for any mistakes in the flavor of the beer, even if it had nothing to do with the chiller. I vividly remember having to ...


2

It's a fine idea. The nice thing about the "traditional" approach is that the surfaces that touch the wort are exposed, easily cleaned, and can be inspected for cleanliness. Plus, as someone commented, you'll need a pump to move the wort through the IC, which is another complication and something else to clean. For a long time, I did something similar (and ...


2

The easiest and cheapest solution is to either use hop bags/socks or build a hop bag hanger which is also known as a hop spider and other names. Google for those and you'll find some simple, easy designs you can build with a quick trip to the hardware store. If you have a Blichman kettle, you can try the Hop Blocker. Keep in mind that this is only designed ...


2

It's fine to boil the chiller for a few minutes to sanitize it. Just make sure you give the chiller a good cleaning in acetic acid prior to its first use, as per Palmer's advice.


2

Unless you have sewer problems now, I don't see how you would run in to trouble. It's pretty much like running your kitchen sink for 45 minutes. Your water supply should be pressurized by your service provider.


2

Summary: Immersion chillers have diminishing returns on length. The first foot of tube does more work than any other foot of tube. The last foot does the least. An immersion chiller is a specific example of a device called a heat exchanger. As an engineer I took classes in heat transfer and heat exchanger design. Although I can explain exactly why ...


2

No. The comparatively low pH will not leach the copper in any appreciable way into a wort solution.


2

I think that the acidity does not have an influence on copper, but it does on copper oxidation, which you do not want in your beer. Always clean and dry your chiller very well, and store it dry so that it does not oxidise (turns green).


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible