9

TL; DR; You need to clean! You do this for safety, repeatability, and to avoid wasting your effort. I have cleaned poorly before and wasted brews of both wine and beer, since I took a more rigorous approach I have only had 1 contaminated brew in 13 years, and that was using kit and sanitiser that were not my own. Even if you are making a wild brew you need ...


3

Unfortunately, yes, it is needed. When I was starting, in my first year, I lost a lot of batches, I could say 2 from 3 batches were lost due to bad cleaning, I never figured exactly what I was not cleaning good enough, but the result was aways the same, a rotten taste and smell.


3

Time for a good sterilizing. Break all your equipment down that comes in contact with cooled wort, and use a sterilizing cleaner or boil the parts if they can handle the temperature. Dismantle all valves. (even on hot kettles) Remove fittings from lines. Use line brushes on all lines. Dismantle bottling wand. If you use a plate or counter flow chiller, ...


2

Cleaning is definitely the least fun part (besides drinking the beer, terrible) about brewing but after a few spoiled batches I too take it almost to the extreme. The pain of dumping a batch and whole day of work does not compare to the bit of extra work of cleaning and sanitation. I don’t think it works that simple, not cleaning a spoon doesn’t ...


2

I suspect that the source of the infection was glycerin I used, since I perhaps erroneously assumed it should be sterile from a previously unopened container. I found citations that Sporobolomyces in particular had been isolated from "technical glycerin". Will now run my glycerin supply through the pressure cooker "autoclave". (My wife, trained as a ...


2

It's like with any other food preparation equipment: your stuff needs to be clean, but don't go too crazy with 100%-germ-free / kill-everything-sanitizer-from-hell. During brewing you boil the wort for 60 to 90 minutes, that takes care of whatever may have gotten into it. After boiling you need to be more careful. You want the yeast you pitch to be the ...


1

The trouble with questions like this is in our litigious world if anyone says don't clean and you poison yourself on a home brew and you live in the US you may believe you have the right to sue!!! So I won't answer your question, i will say what i do, not as advice to you, but because i like typing. I am lazy. I do homebrewing from kits but do mess around ...


1

Short answer: Probably no problem. Chemical sanitizers will react with / be neutralized by all the organic material in the wort, leaving the yeast undamaged. But that doesn't necessarily mean you'll want the end result of that reaction in your beer. tl;dr Bleach is effective, and can work very quickly in a high concentrations*, but you'll want to rinse ...


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