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5

They should last at least 50 years, maybe hundreds. I've been using mine for 20 years. David M. Taylor B.S. Chemical Engineering Michigan Tech Class of 1997


5

Honey is aseptic. The water content is too low for microorganisms to develop, so there is no need to pasteurize or use campden. Campden is used in winemaking to eliminate the wild yeasts which exist on grape skins, this helps ensure a more consistent product by eliminating the variation introduced by wild yeasts. None of this is necessary with mead and in ...


4

CO2 bubbles doesn't necessarily mean that fermentation is ongoing. Bubbles are not all released at once. For example, with red wine kits, instructions often mention to stir for several minutes to release all bubbles before bottling. You can try this, use a sanitized spoon to stir and help release all CO2 faster. Also the yeast alcohol tolerance is not a ...


3

Campden tablets consist of sodium metabisulphite (an inorganic salt used as a preservative with no expiry date) and a binder, typically lactose or starch which also doesn't go off. Normally lactose and starch could be subject to bacteria, mold or other organic deterioration, but the sodium metabisulphite will prevent that. Bottom line: use them no matter ...


3

You said you added Campden and potassium metabisulfate. Did you know they are the same thing? (Sometimes they are sodium metabisulfate, but do essentially the same thing) Wine is not beer. Do not rush it. With grapes, it can take months for a wine to clear naturally. If you are in a hurry, try using some gelatin. You do not need to add campden tablets ...


3

My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


3

Primarily its a subject of dietary preference to avoid additional sodium in the diet. However, its a moot point because generally a very small amount of sodium would be being added. Also potassium has a somewhat higher flavor threshold than sodium. Meaning sodium begins to taste saltier sooner than potassium. (at least this is the case on my palate) ...


3

If you are using 1/4 campden tablet per 5 gallons, you should be fine. If you are using 1 tablet per gallon, then you need to wait 24 hours. I typically use 1 tablet for ~10 gallons prior to mashing and do not wait at all. http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter4-1.html


2

Used as you are using it, it will all be gone by the time you add yeast so there's no problem. Not only are there hours between when you add the campden and the yeast, you'll be boiling the water before adding yeast. I have used it to inhibit bacteria when I make cider, but 24 hours after adding I stir the juice and the campden off gasses and there's not ...


2

AFAIK, the tabs are standardized. One tab has enough sulfite to treat 20 gal. of water, so 1/2 tab is enough for your needs. If the tabs are are 550 mg., I'd base the powder measurements on that. It would be easy to add a dose of powder and either smell or taste the water to see how effective it was. BTW, water guru Martin Brungard has recently written ...


2

Yes, you can make mead without campden tablets. I only use them for stabilizing the mead at the end. 1 campden tablet per gallon to ensure fermentation does not kick back up. I have never added them to the beginning. Some people will pasteurize/boil their meads, claiming that pasteurization will kill all impurities. That is an old school mentality, as ...


2

Campden tablets are usually Potassium Metabisulfite .It works by depriving organisms of oxygen, kinda like how halon puts a fire out. For yeast it means it doesn't have what it needs so it's waiting, doesn't kill it. I've made cider from juice that used Potassium Metabisulfide as a preservative, fermination would only start once the preservative was ...


2

The temperature could be a factor, make sure your bottles are stored at a correct temperature (see the yeast package for ideal temperature). It is possible that the SO2 did not evaporate as much as expected? There are kits that you can buy to measure sulfites in wine : Titrets It is also possible that the yeast in the bottles did not get enough oxygen to ...


2

The tablets work pretty much instantaneoulsy, so as long as you crush the tabs well before using them (keep in mind that 1 will treat up to 20 gal.) and give then 5 min. to work, you'll be fine. As to your CO2 question, you need to have a CO2 tank to dispense. The sugar you added will carb the cider, but you'll lose it all if you don't add more CO2 to ...


2

Are you starting a brew or finishing one off? Rule of thumb to keep handy when using any kind of enzyme in brewing; enzymes are proteins and proteins don’t mix well with bentonite or with sulfur dioxide. Always wait at least 12 hours, like your package directions dictate, between using sulfur dioxide and one of the other two products. In your particular ...


2

According to jackkeller.net, the action of pectic enzymes is reduced by high levels of sulphur dioxide. The gases dissipate after the addition of the campden tablets, which is the reason for recommending to wait 12 hours before adding the enzymes. (Whether the enzymes are actually denatured by the sulphur dioxide is somewhat unclear.)


2

My stock is about 12 years old, and the tablets still do their job, removing chlorine and chloramines.


1

Campden (or rather sodium meta-bisulphite, which is its active ingredient) serves multiple purposes in wine making. It removes chloramine from municipal tap water, but in your case that is unnecessary since you use chlorine-free water. It serves as a microbial inactivator, which means that in low acidity musts (i.e. insufficient acidity to keep microbes in ...


1

if they have remained bone dry and away from air, they should be fine. If they've gotten moist or haven't been sealed properly in a right sized container, then they will have slowly gassed off their sulfites and just the starches will remain.


1

You should be totally good to go using the maple syrup without any treatment, because it has been simmered for quite a long time to make it into syrup. No worries there so long as your syrup folks have good sanitation. (The probably do.) Your apple cider is definitely suspect because yeast is every-friggin-where, including apple skins. The standard way to ...


1

OK... Let's think about this critically. Suppose your maple syrup had some stray yeast in it. What would happen? Well, yeast eats sugars and burbs CO2 and pees alcohol. What does that mean for your maple syrup? It means that your maple syrup would be all alcohol and the side of the jug would be split open (so, it wouldn't matter if it was alcohol or not). ...


1

Sparkaloid, acording to the SDS, is composed of, "natural diatomaceous earth - amorphous silica (CAS number 1344-95-2) , alginates". None of these really interact with sodium metabisulphite or potossium sorbate. There is some potential reaction between sodium bisulfite and alginates (but requiring presence of nitrites). Bisulfites can react with aldehydes in ...


1

Given your recipe has fruit. I would make sure everything reaches a boil for 3 minutes, or at least a pasteurizing temp around 160°F, then bottle hot into mason jars. Campden may be an option if boiling is not, but this doesn't kill yeast / bacteria. It only deprives the solution of oxygen inhibiting growth phases for microbes that require oxygen to do so.


1

Thanks, jsled. Here is the PDF that outlines the specifics from your link. The discussion of Campden Tablets begins on Page 23. Page 24 is where the 20 gallon recommendation appears. An important note here is that this is assuming the tablet is "695 mg of, presumably, nearly pure potassium metabisulfite." Also, from the article "Our recommendation of 1 ...


1

The source I've used is this ProBrewer thread and comment (#3) which references AJ DeLange's defunct web site, archived here. The tl;dr version is: 30mg of sodium metabisulfite or 35mg potassium metabisulfite per gallon of water. For my usual 10gl ± 3gl of brewing water (10gl batches) I often over-compensate and just add 1g of k-meta to each (mash and ...


1

I performed my first rack on some muscadine wine. I had 5 Camden tablets crushed and diluted in jug #2. Jug #1's content was deep pink. The content in the siphon line was pink. As soon as the wine touch the Camden/water solution in Jug #2, it turned a hazy gold color.


1

Are you adding it to the must to sterilise it, or are you simply adding it to the water to remove chlorine before adding the water to the other ingredients? If the former, yes, you should leave it 24 hours before adding the yeast. By that time the sulphur dioxide will have evaporated and should be of no detriment to the yeast. I usually add the Campden when ...


1

Heh, go back and read the link. It has been updated to indicate this is a myth... "It is a common misconception that campden tablet can be used to halt the ferment process..." same here too


1

I have made honey mead pasteurizing it and without. There is significant taste in both. The unpasteurized mead has more depth of flavor than the pasteurized mead. Almost all of us buy honey from the store which has been pasteurized. Unless you are buying raw honey it may be safe to heat it. For dry mead I never add campden tablets. If I back sweeten the ...


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