3 Hopefully last edit on the carb table!
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I have seen "force carbonation tablesforce carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

I have seen "force carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

I have seen "force carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

2 Improved the example CO2 chart
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I have seen "force carbonation tablesforce carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

I have seen "force carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

I have seen "force carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?

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1
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Does a given pressure and temperature determine the number of volumes of CO2?

I have seen "force carbonation tables" used by folks who use keg systems. They apply the tables to getting CO2 forced into a beer, and have an ending number of CO2 volumes in mind, then set the regulator to a certain pressure. But is it valid to measure temperature and pressure and derive how many volumes of CO2 are in a bottle of beer?

Am I doing this right?

Going from primary to secondary I had a little too much to fit into the secondary, so I put it in this 3 liter bottle to get an early taste. I squeezed out all the air, put some CO2 on top of it and shook it for a minute or more. I let it sit in the fridge for a few hours, shook it again. Then afer another hour, I did this measurement (53F and 22.5 PSI). Does is this tell me that this beer has about 2.7 (or so) volumes CO2?