Dean Brundage
  • Member for 12 years
  • Last seen more than 1 year ago
13 answers
6 votes
7k views
How do you prevent boil-overs?
3 votes

Giant Pot I use a 20 gallon pot for a typical 12.5 gallon wort boil. Sometimes I have a spray bottle

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2 answers
6 votes
2k views
What's the best way to add lemonade to a wheat beer?
2 votes

Just Do It Add lemonade to your bottling bucket after you bottled the normal portion of wheat beer. Remember that most lemonades will contribute sugars that the yeast will eat. Try to figure out the ...

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1 answers
2 votes
905 views
First All Grain Batch / LOW Efficiency
5 votes

Get to know your system Starting gravity is one measure that helps you produce consistent beers. Suppose you made this beer again with the same ingredients, using the same process. All other things ...

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3 answers
6 votes
3k views
How do you filter at home?
Accepted answer
6 votes

Free (or nearly free) Cold Conditioning Before packaging drop the temperature to the thirties or forties Fahrenheit. Hold the beer here for a few days. Haze-causing proteins coagulate more easily ...

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5 answers
14 votes
25k views
Do you filter water, or just use tap water?
Accepted answer
13 votes

Most tap water (in America) is good for brewing I recommend removing (filtering) or adding things to your water only if you have a problem with it. (Or want to create a beer with a historic profile, ...

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3 answers
11 votes
21k views
Why is it bad to pitch too little yeast?
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3 votes

Yeast produce different flavors during the various stages of their lifecycle. Underpitching lengthens their "growth" phase (maybe a better name is "division" or "budding"). The bulk of a beer's ...

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1 answers
19 votes
13k views
Why is it bad to pitch too much yeast?
Accepted answer
17 votes

Yeast produce different flavors during the various stages of their lifecycle. Overpitching shortens or skips their "growth" phase (maybe a better name is "division" or "budding"). The bulk of a beer'...

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2 answers
5 votes
870 views
Dry Hopping without a bag
1 votes

Probably It'll give your beer a nice little aroma boost. See also: Pellet Hops spilled out of bag in secondary. Advice?

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2 answers
9 votes
2k views
Dry hopping without secondary fermentation
3 votes

I suggest you do it a week or a few days before bottling. Hop aromas are volatile and the less time they are in an "open" environment the better. If you throw the hops in without a bag allow a ...

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6 answers
5 votes
3k views
How do you clean scorched wort off stainless steel?
2 votes

I think an angle grinder with an abrasive pad will do the trick. That method is somewhere between Barkeeper's Friend and oven cleaner.

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2 answers
12 votes
8k views
Using a keg for secondary fermentation and natural carbonation?
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8 votes

How much priming? See A Primer on Priming and How to Brew. Add sugar like you normally would. Prepwork Follow your normal keg prep work. Clean and sanitize the keg. Inspect the gaskets and seals....

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1 answers
5 votes
224 views
Do you strain break material from DME boiled for priming?
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5 votes

No I just dump. [Edit, thanks to TinCoyote] When asking these sort of questions I always think about the proportions (or dilution rate). Pitching a few tens of ml into 19,000 ml won't even ...

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5 answers
25 votes
3k views
Reusing yeast at home
7 votes

I've been listening to Basic Brewing Radio. Here are some episodes about reusing yeast. November 1st, 2007 Reusing yeast February 7th, 2008 Advanced yeast handling February 26th, 2009 Carboy top-...

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3 answers
7 votes
5k views
What are the effects of slower cooling of wort?
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11 votes

Relax, don't worry Firstly, thirty minutes is not a long time. It's not particularly quick, but you're probably fine. Secondly, some pioneering Australian brewers developed a no-chill brewing ...

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24 answers
40 votes
20k views
What are the easiest and hardest commercial beer bottles to re-use for homebrew?
0 votes

Guinness draft labels are easiest to use. They are made of heat-shrink plastic that doesn't use glue. Good luck getting the widget out. Guinness bottle http://www.rodneypiper.tv/images/...

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5 answers
14 votes
19k views
Can I skip the mash out replacing it by sparging?
Accepted answer
8 votes

In short: Yes, no problem, go for it, relax, don't worry. Like many all-grain brewers, I used a cooler for a mash tun making it difficult to raise the temperature to mash out. I still made good ...

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2 answers
14 votes
2k views
Storage of hops pellets
Accepted answer
12 votes

I buy hops by the pound and store in the freezer between uses. Remove as much air as you can. I seal in ziploc bags and squeeze the air out Keep them in the freezer Realize that hops will lose some ...

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1 answers
9 votes
370 views
Adding Oak Flavor/character to beer
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5 votes

I've seen a great picture of an oak table leg sticking out the top of a carboy. Wish I could find it. BYO covered this question in depth. So I won't plagiarize everything here. Oak Essence and ...

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1 answers
3 votes
130 views
Hop Gardening Considerations
Accepted answer
4 votes

Hops should be grown in well-drained soil. Mounding aids drainage, therefore may be unnecessary. It should be about three feet in diameter. Amend your soil with some organic matter like manure or ...

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1 answers
3 votes
303 views
Grains for Mashing and Grains for Steeping
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2 votes

http://homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart

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4 answers
12 votes
9k views
Alpha acids vs. beta acids in aging?
9 votes

This is a nice technical question involving some organic chemistry I do not comprehend. I'll begin with what I do know about bittering contributions from alpha acid and beta acids. These acids are ...

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1 answers
6 votes
311 views
What is conversion?
Accepted answer
5 votes

In the mash, starch is converted into sugar, which is further broken down to fermentable & unfermentable sugars. There are a lot of things going on in the mash. Like the question says, conversion ...

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4 answers
7 votes
2k views
Taste Test for Stale Beer
0 votes

Order something from Amazon.com Open a package of unsalted saltines and leave it on top of the refrigerator. Once your package arrives, enjoy your purchase. Cut a 2 inch square piece from the ...

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4 answers
11 votes
6k views
Using Multiple Strains of Yeast in the Same Batch?
4 votes

Can't think of a reason not to try it. There some examples in the pro-brewing world too. Some high gravity beers are finished with a different yeast and some beers are bottle conditioned with ...

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
19 votes

Yeast Managment Yeast produce different flavors during the phases in their lifecycle. Pitching the right quantity of healthy yeast is in the top two most important things you can do to control ...

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
12 votes

Reading Designing Great Beers By Ray Daniels. It's packed full of principles and practicalities. Buy it on Amazon

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
3 votes

Good Vorlauf Once you've gone all-grain improving your recirculation will leave proteins in the mash. This increases beer clarity.

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
28 votes

Patience For me, this mostly applies to fermentation. Allow it to complete then wait a few more days. After packaging chill undisturbed for at least two weeks so suspended particles fall to the ...

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
7 votes

Going All-Grain

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18 answers
44 votes
6k views
Improving Your Brewing Significantly
6 votes

Sourcing the freshest ingredients (especially extracts)

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