Dean Brundage
  • Member for 12 years, 1 month
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
Is it important to weigh down a hop bag for dry-hopping?
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12 votes

It helps, but is not necessary The more the hops are exposed to wort the better the aromas and flavors will transfer to the beer. Use something you can sanitize - smooth like marbles, coins, washers ...

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What is a hopback?
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12 votes

http://bayareabrewing.com/category/homebrew/10/ Theory A hopback is a sealed chamber into which you put whole leaf hops. Hot wort exits the kettle, passing through the hopback before chilling. ...

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Wort Chiller Cool Down Times?
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4 votes

I've used the bathtub method, a home made immersion chiller (IC) and a counterflow chiller (CFC). My beer improved by a great leap when I switched to the CFC. I have not timed it, however I estimate ...

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Preventing a Stuck Sparge
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6 votes

Get the right crush This is the single most important thing to prevent a stuck sparge. Read the HomebrewTalk's wiki page on evaluating the crush. An ideal milling breaks the internal bits of grain ...

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What's the difference between primary & secondary fermentation?
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22 votes

Image from HowToBrew Rather than thinking about stages of fermentation I like to look at the lifecycle of yeast. There is a great interview with David Logsdon from Wyeast on the April 5, 2007 episode ...

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Cleaner wort out of the Kettle
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4 votes

Removing hot break is beneficial to your finished beer. Many of the compounds taste bad and can stay in suspension through fermentation to packaging. Totally removing hot & cold break, such as ...

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How do I adjust mash temperature and thickness to add body to a beer?
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1 votes

There are easy two things you can do in the mash to manipulate the flavor profile (this also applies to steeping specialty grains). Thick Mash Use a water to grist ratio that is less than 1.25 quart ...

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What is the max time it would take yeast to "clean up"?
0 votes

There are a couple things yeast will clean up after fermentation. We do sensory analysis for two off-flavors during fermentation: diacetyl and acetaldehyde. Diacetyl occurs when alpha acetolactate (...

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High FG in primary fermentation
2 votes

It kinda depends. You have to know a little about your yeast. Fermentation achieved 74% apparent attenuation, which is about average for most yeasts. Is yours capable of more? The ABV of your beer ...

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Should I boil water before adding it to the cooled wort?
0 votes

Absolutely While tap water (in the United States) is chlorinated, it does not eliminate beer spoilage microorganisms. Boiling is the easiest, most effective way to kill them.

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What does 'Imperial' mean with regards to beer style?
9 votes

It is part marketing and part tradition. The term has origins in high gravity and hopped porters exported from England. The BJCP 2008 Style Guidelines has this to say about the Russian Imperial ...

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Effects of different boil intensities
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10 votes

I have half a blog post in my head about the six -ations of the boil. Here's a sample. Also listen to the thermal load episode of Brew Strong for a lot of good information. In general, shoot for an ...

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Experimenting with primary-only and primary-secondary fermentation
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2 votes

That depends on the question you want to answer. bottling the primary-only batch after a week but leaving bottles for the extra week to let the primary-secondary batch catch up and How does the ...

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What is the conversion rate between dry malt extract (DME) and liquid malt extract (LME)?
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15 votes

In short: 4.2 lbs DME DME = 0.84 * LME LME = 1.19 * DME The whyfor It depends on the manufacturer. Extracts and malts and adjuncts all have a "points per pound per gallon" rating that you can look ...

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Water For Robust Porter
1 votes

I would leave this alone (mostly). There are no red-flags in the water report. Bicarbonate and alkalinity are moderately well suited for a stout. If you want to tip the sulfate / chloride ratio ...

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Was my mash pH okay? Should I be adjusting it?
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2 votes

Your pH was right on. The optimal range for alpha- and beta-amylase is 5.1 to 5.5. See the "mash target" bubble in this image from How To Brew.

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What might kill a ginger bug - fact and fiction?
5 votes

You're probably not getting fermentation in the bottle. "make the ginger tea/syrup in a stainless steel pot" What are you doing in this step? If you are boiling to make a syrup you are killing ...

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Fermentation vessel too small for beer kit
1 votes

Having 20% headspace is a good idea, but not necessary as HourOfTheBeast pointed out. It's perfectly fine to make a concentrated wort. I'd recommend pitching twice the amount of yeast to ensure ...

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What makes a beer tap/faucet different from the water ones?
3 votes

Ball valves should work fine. However consider: Turbulence causes CO2 to come out of solution. Faucets are designed to minimize this effect whereas ball valves may not. Ball valves will be difficult ...

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Improving Your Brewing Significantly
13 votes

Full Wort Boils Boiling your full volume of wort — as opposed to boiling a concentrated portion of your wort and then adding water to the fermenter to reach your full volume — will ...

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How do you sparge?
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43 votes

Sparge means "sprinkle". The purpose of sparging is to rinse all the sugars out of the mash. In concept, that's really all you are doing - rinsing your grain bed. It also halts enzymatic activity ...

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Corny keg fermentors
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5 votes

You may be better off using corny kegs as a secondary fermenter. (If you transfer.) I use them as brite tanks, clarifying my beer a week before serving. There is no risk of krausen explosion You can ...

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Improving Your Brewing Significantly
15 votes

Using a Wort Chiller This has a few advantages: Better cold break Less chance for unwanted organisms to get a foothold Minimizes the time wort is in the DMS-precursor-producing temperature range ...

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Early vs Late secondary fermentation
2 votes

Read the answers to this question: What's the difference between primary & secondary fermentation? I am an advocate of not racking to secondary. To answer your question: Advantages (of not ...

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Sanitation & Dry Hopping
18 votes

There is an infection risk any time you open up your fermenter and especially when you throw stuff into it. If you dry hop at the right time you reduce that risk. The alcohol built up protects ...

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Re-racking in a Buffalo Trace whiskey barrel
5 votes

See this question: Keeping a barrel Our club put 55 gallons of Russian Imperial stout in a Merlot barrel a few weeks ago. We pumped 20 gallons of boiling water into it to sanitize. I sent an email ...

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Different OG than predicted
2 votes

See answers to this question.

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Fermentation Temperature Control Methods
4 votes

See also: this discussion. And the HomebrewTalk wiki page. Controlling fermentation temperature is one of the best things you can do to make good beer! One of the most basic ways to keep your brew ...

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Secondary size?
2 votes

I mentioned in a beer storage question that oxygen is one of the two beer spoilers. Minimize the exposure to oxygen by leaving little head space in your secondary vessel. If you keg, you can flood ...

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How to grow yeast?
18 votes

The first thing you must learn how to do is make a yeast starter. This is simpler than making beer but your sanitation must be very good, don't be intimidated. Yeast Starter Mix malt extract and ...

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