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9

I am calling bullshit on the first article. Does this make any sense to you? "Brewer's yeast is used to brew homemade wines and beers, while baker's yeast makes bread rise. You can't brew alcohol with baker's yeast and you can't leaven bread with brewer's yeast" This is completely wrong. They are both are saccharomyces cerevisiae and do essentially the ...


5

Dry yeast packets are generally enough for 3-6 gallons. So with 1 gallon, about 1/4 of one pack is plenty for a commercial dried yeast such as Danstar Lallemand Nottingham Ale yeast. And you most definitely would not need 2 packs! Even 1 whole pack is a major over-pitch.


4

Patience. You rushed it. Give it 5 months. Then it will be done.


4

It's a great idea. Everybody loves to overcomplicate nutrient additions. I don't. Just add them at the beginning, it works fine.


4

You will not achieve 40% using fermentation as the only technique. Yeast have a certain alcohol tolerance that is usually between 14% and 18% (wine yeast), above that percentage, yeast will stop working. Depending of your yeast strain (check the yeast pack for this information), it should stop working around the alcohol tolerance (more or less). To ...


3

tl;dr: this is a complex issue and only a few papers on the subject have been published, but the long and short of it is that wort composition and yeast genetics, not fermentation temperature, are the key factor in the level at which volatile spicy phenols are formed. Details: After consulting with a brewing scientist (yes, PhD and everything) and reading ...


3

Yes and Yes. Chlorine and Chloramine are both used to sanitize. Killing bacteria, fungi, and yeast is why they are added to water supplies. They kill the things that make you sick...and things that make you happy. There is no discrimination. Allowing your water to sit overnight or by filtering it (with filters that say they get Chlorine out) usually will ...


3

This all looks a bit like gobbledygook if you ask me. The intention is not to dry yeast commercially, simply for the home brewer. Norweigien Kveik has been dried at home for centuries, how do you think they dealt with it in the past before UV lights stainless steel chambers, pressurised canisters etc. I would suggest you look at David Heath's Youtube channel ...


3

Refractometer does not read correctly when alcohol is present. It is important only to measure in Brix, never specific gravity. Then use the following conversion calculator to determine the true final gravity and alcohol by volume. Very very important fact that many people miss! https://www.brewersfriend.com/refractometer-calculator/ Based on this ...


3

You are confusing a couple of things. You want oxygen for a robust fermentation, no doubt about that. BUT, after the primary fermentation is done, you want to cut off the supply of oxygen otherwise the mead/wine/beer will oxidize because there is nothing to consume the oxygen. With beer we replace that with CO2, but with mead and wine you need to do ...


3

The basics It's possible that your must / early mead simply doesn't have enough nutrients for the yeast to continue going gangbusters. When I say "nutrients" here, that includes more than just the sugars in the must -- yeast also need other things in their food in order to perform well, things like bio-available nitrogen, vitamins, and the like. When ...


3

To eliminate any risk at all, you could discard the harvested yeast. I agree with you, that most likely the acetobacter came from the raspberries. However, it's possible also that it simply flew in from the air or otherwise was incorporated as part of the racking to secondary. So there's no way to know for sure really.


3

Brettanomyces will make acetic acid in the presence of ethanol and oxygen. You'd need to determine if there is actually acetobacter present in the harvested slurry to know for sure if it was "clean". It is possible you picked up too much oxygen on transfer or had too much headspace in secondary.


3

The Campden probably will not kill your yeast, but will only make the yeast upset, causing them to increase sulfur production and make them more sluggish, but things will stabilize again after a week or so. I believe everything will still turn out alright. If you are concerned, then add extra yeast. However I don't believe this will be necessary. Good ...


2

As a general rule, when you are re-sizing recipes you want to keep all ingredients in basically the same proportions. This includes the number of yeast cells. If you do not double the yeast, you will be asking each yeast cell to be doing twice the work, which would tend to affect the performance of the yeast, and therefore the chemical composition of the ...


2

An interesting short article on this topic on https://www.whitelabs.com/beer/using-multiple-yeast-strains agrees that mixing is fine and seems to suggest time-splitting is best for the esters/attenuation mix (see the second Q&A). Good question GrainMother. Hope the brew turned out well whatever you did.


2

At this point, I have made many one gallon batches of beer, cider and mead using S.Boulardii as my yeast. Cider is by far the easiest. Simply empty a capsule of Florastor or Boulardii Max into a jug of preservative free pure apple juice then stick on your air-lock. If you really want to be cheap and not get a bubbler, you can just put some aluminum foil over ...


2

The STC-1000 has two relays, each of which is rated for 10 amps (i.e. 2400W if your mains voltage is 240V). Your heat pad draws about 1% of that so you'll be fine. The STC-1000 is made for repeated on/off cycles so there's nothing to worry about.


2

Don’t worry, stupid questions do not exist, especially if it concerns safety. The cooling socket can be left unplugged, it doesn’t matter. Even if the controller turns the power for cooling on without something plugged in, it won’t burn/short-circuit anything. The controller is (or at least should) easily be able to handle 25W, even for months straight. ...


2

I have just revived a liquid yeast that was in the fridge for 2.5 years, I cleaned it up, did a starter and its like new.. I took some microscope samples and didn't see any bacteria infection or mutations and even made a little fun video on it, for anyone interested... co2 gas bubble moving under the slide, live sample from active fermentation


2

Sorry that that you missed High Krausen, but on the positive side all is not lost. Sounds like you had VERY good fermentation conditions and healthy yeast. While I've never had a beer reach final that fast I've found that when the conditions are good fermentation can happen a LOT faster than expected. I would still dry hop it as planned. I am told that by ...


2

There is very little difference in price compared to a big difference in results. Bread yeast feeds on starches in the flour, producing CO₂ which expands the gluten proteins in the flour, gluten proteins cause the dough (of which flour is a main ingredient) to expand and rise. Baking removes the alcohol. Beer yeast is designed for low temperature and ...


2

Baker's yeast is a very poor yeast for brewing - prone to infection and produces poor alcohol content before dying off. Your wort should keep for a day or two if tightly covered, but if unsure, you can reboil it to sterilise before brewing.


2

So the reason for removing juice rather than getting a larger container is to protect the sanitary environment of the juice bottle. If you start transferring juice into a new container, you are effectively undoing that. In this case you really need the ability to sanitize your bottles and equipment. Regarding letting your juice stand for 10 days before ...


2

Chlorine and chloramine both kill microbes including yeast. Bleach is used as a disinfectant after all. But the key is chlorine concentration. Bleach, for example. will kill microbes (including yeast) in two or three minutes. Tap water is chlorinated to a level where the chlorine and chloramine can take care of any remaining microbes while the tap water ...


2

To the purist, a lager should be brewed with a S. Pastorianus strain of yeast and an ale with S. Cerevisiae strain of yeast. The former ("lager yeast") works at far lower temperatures than the latter "ale yeast") does. That said, the first lagers (in Bohemia in the 1500's or so) were brewed with whatever yeast happened to end up in the beer. Nobody knew ...


2

I send an email to John Palmer, he has been kind enough to answer. I guess it is ok to post it here, so here it is: Hi, It's best practice. Lots of breweries cold crash, and they lose head retention as a result. Thermal shock is most prevalent on cooling, not heating, although it can occur then too. But the difference of 10-20F at pitching doesn't ...


2

Sometimes (rarely and with low gravity table beer) I see very little signs of fermentation. Just a thin layer of krausen on top. The only way to really know if fermentation has started/finished is to test the gravity to see if any of the sugars have been converted by the yeast you used. If this test shows that the gravity is the same as the starting gravity,...


2

Check SG again in a week and see if it’s changed. If it has changed at all, it’s till fermenting. If it has actually stopped or if you are impatient, toss in some ec1118 to finish the job. k1v-1116 has actually already done everything it’s going to do taste and body wise to your wine so it’s not that important that it’s the one that finishes the job. It does ...


2

Some wineries which develop their own strains of yeast or allow wild yeasts to inoculate their wine. The majority of the rest use packets of dry active yeast. Some may use liquid strains simply because those strains are only available in liquid form, but the rest just pitch dry yeast. I also know of a brewery yeast biologist who has stated unwaveringly ...


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