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9

I am calling bullshit on the first article. Does this make any sense to you? "Brewer's yeast is used to brew homemade wines and beers, while baker's yeast makes bread rise. You can't brew alcohol with baker's yeast and you can't leaven bread with brewer's yeast" This is completely wrong. They are both are saccharomyces cerevisiae and do essentially the ...


6

Almost certainly the starter yeast is yeast slurry that's been stored frozen in liquid nitrogen. Interestingly, one of the most common methods is to store it inside sealed-off portions of plastic drinking straws. Commercial yeast labs have large collections (sometimes called libraries) of pure cultures of different strains of yeast stored this way (pure ...


4

You will not achieve 40% using fermentation as the only technique. Yeast have a certain alcohol tolerance that is usually between 14% and 18% (wine yeast), above that percentage, yeast will stop working. Depending of your yeast strain (check the yeast pack for this information), it should stop working around the alcohol tolerance (more or less). To ...


4

It's a great idea. Everybody loves to overcomplicate nutrient additions. I don't. Just add them at the beginning, it works fine.


4

Patience. You rushed it. Give it 5 months. Then it will be done.


4

That beer definitely needs more time. It's likely that the periods of lower temperature slowed or potentially even halted fermentation, and the sweet smell you describe is probably unfermented sugars in the wort. You just need to warm that brew up a bit (19°C as you've said there is perfect) and wait another couple of days at least. At best, bottling now ...


4

If you have "spritz", which is carbon dioxide gas, then you have fermentation. No need for concern. Ginger beer often will not have the yeast krausen layer on top, the yeast remains suspended within the beer itself until it is finished and then will settle out. All you need now is patience. Just leave it alone. All is well. Cheers, good luck, ...


3

The Campden probably will not kill your yeast, but will only make the yeast upset, causing them to increase sulfur production and make them more sluggish, but things will stabilize again after a week or so. I believe everything will still turn out alright. If you are concerned, then add extra yeast. However I don't believe this will be necessary. Good ...


3

Brettanomyces will make acetic acid in the presence of ethanol and oxygen. You'd need to determine if there is actually acetobacter present in the harvested slurry to know for sure if it was "clean". It is possible you picked up too much oxygen on transfer or had too much headspace in secondary.


3

To eliminate any risk at all, you could discard the harvested yeast. I agree with you, that most likely the acetobacter came from the raspberries. However, it's possible also that it simply flew in from the air or otherwise was incorporated as part of the racking to secondary. So there's no way to know for sure really.


3

This all looks a bit like gobbledygook if you ask me. The intention is not to dry yeast commercially, simply for the home brewer. Norweigien Kveik has been dried at home for centuries, how do you think they dealt with it in the past before UV lights stainless steel chambers, pressurised canisters etc. I would suggest you look at David Heath's Youtube channel ...


3

tl;dr: this is a complex issue and only a few papers on the subject have been published, but the long and short of it is that wort composition and yeast genetics, not fermentation temperature, are the key factor in the level at which volatile spicy phenols are formed. Details: After consulting with a brewing scientist (yes, PhD and everything) and reading ...


3

The basics It's possible that your must / early mead simply doesn't have enough nutrients for the yeast to continue going gangbusters. When I say "nutrients" here, that includes more than just the sugars in the must -- yeast also need other things in their food in order to perform well, things like bio-available nitrogen, vitamins, and the like. When ...


3

At the high end (81F) plus an additional couple of degrees generated by the yeast there isn't much except Kveik that would make decent beer. At the lower end, there are some Ale-strains that would produce okay beer, I suspect that you will have better results by finding a cooler room - or try to investigate some cooling hacks (wet wrapping + fan, or ...


2

Check SG again in a week and see if it’s changed. If it has changed at all, it’s till fermenting. If it has actually stopped or if you are impatient, toss in some ec1118 to finish the job. k1v-1116 has actually already done everything it’s going to do taste and body wise to your wine so it’s not that important that it’s the one that finishes the job. It does ...


2

So the reason for removing juice rather than getting a larger container is to protect the sanitary environment of the juice bottle. If you start transferring juice into a new container, you are effectively undoing that. In this case you really need the ability to sanitize your bottles and equipment. Regarding letting your juice stand for 10 days before ...


2

Sometimes (rarely and with low gravity table beer) I see very little signs of fermentation. Just a thin layer of krausen on top. The only way to really know if fermentation has started/finished is to test the gravity to see if any of the sugars have been converted by the yeast you used. If this test shows that the gravity is the same as the starting gravity,...


2

An interesting short article on this topic on https://www.whitelabs.com/beer/using-multiple-yeast-strains agrees that mixing is fine and seems to suggest time-splitting is best for the esters/attenuation mix (see the second Q&A). Good question GrainMother. Hope the brew turned out well whatever you did.


2

At this point, I have made many one gallon batches of beer, cider and mead using S.Boulardii as my yeast. Cider is by far the easiest. Simply empty a capsule of Florastor or Boulardii Max into a jug of preservative free pure apple juice then stick on your air-lock. If you really want to be cheap and not get a bubbler, you can just put some aluminum foil over ...


2

I have just revived a liquid yeast that was in the fridge for 2.5 years, I cleaned it up, did a starter and its like new.. I took some microscope samples and didn't see any bacteria infection or mutations and even made a little fun video on it, for anyone interested... co2 gas bubble moving under the slide, live sample from active fermentation


2

I owned and operated a small winery for about 15 years. There are two ways to get yeast into your wine. Dried yeast or the skins of the grapes. The dried cultures are super high quality so I would buy kilos of dried yeast a year. Worked great. My wines scored 90+ points many times in magazines like Wine Spectator and Wine Advocate. I have made wine both ways ...


2

Some wineries which develop their own strains of yeast or allow wild yeasts to inoculate their wine. The majority of the rest use packets of dry active yeast. Some may use liquid strains simply because those strains are only available in liquid form, but the rest just pitch dry yeast. I also know of a brewery yeast biologist who has stated unwaveringly ...


2

Liquid yeast will survive for many days, and probably weeks, outside of being refrigerated. No need to overthink this. The yeast will be just fine until you get home. Cheers.


2

Refractometers don't measure Brix accurately when alcohol is present. You're better off using a hydrometer if you really want to know when sugar is half gone, then it's just when gravity points are half of what you started with, e.g., when 1.100 becomes 1.050, approximately. That being said, their procedure isn't critical. Many people would just give it a ...


2

First, not all kraüsens stay fluffy during the whole fermentation. There are high and low kraüsens, long lasting and short lived kraüsens. You can't use them as a measure for your fermentation. Second, I know the BE-256, it is indeed a rather powerful yeast. However, you should give it the normal fermentation time. Sometimes a fast initial fermentation is ...


2

The generally specified amount is about 1/3 of a cup of yeast slurry into a 20 litre/5 gallon batch - so maybe 25ml, more?. This is all very rough, because you can never be sure of the concentration or viability of the yeast without putting it under a microscope. It's difficult to pitch too much yeast at the home brew level though, so I'd err on the side ...


2

While I'm not entirely sure what you're proposing is true (see below), here are some points to consider which potentially support your claim: Saccharomyces bayanus has an active fructose uptake system, while S. cerevisiae relies on 'facilitated diffusion' to uptake fructose. Meaning? S. bayanus actually expends cellular energy to bring fructose into the ...


2

No. You didn't kill your cider, this description sounds like a perfectly normal fermentation. Generally a yeast fermentation is vigorous in the first 1~7 days (typically producing a krausen), this phase is known by the term "primary fermentation". The time taken can be significantly different depending on temperature, sugar-concentration, amount of yeast, ...


2

Not particularly worrying. If temperature is under control and yeast amount is right, then head space as others say - as well as using a blow-off tube rather than a traditional air lock.


1

Great question. There should be enough yeast still present to carbonate your bottles. If you want to be sure, it wouldn't be wrong just to add about 1 gram of fresh yeast before bottling. You don't need a whole pack, just a tiny amount. But this is optional. I'll bet if you don't add any more yeast it will still carbonate just fine.


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