Hot answers tagged

3

It should work, depending on style. Popcorn is essentially cooked corn starch, so it comes pre-gelatinized and when mixed with sufficient diastatic malt it should saccharify. As the previous posted already noted, the salt will raise your sodium levels. Contrary to popular belief, the "buttered" popcorn rarely contains any butter. The butter flavour ...


2

There are multiple reasons why you will have different levels of krausen in different beers. As @Frank van Wensveen pointed out, melanoidins are one source. These are produced by Maillard reactions during the malt kilning process (i.e. making dark malts) as well as during any similar heating process, such as a decoction mash (where a portion of the mash is ...


2

Let the bubbling stop. Then put it in the fridge. Then after a couple of days of clearing put it in the fridge to let the yeast settle out. Once this is done, carefully puur your fermented liquor off the lees(left over yeast), and drink. Do not expect this to be good, it will be liquid and contain alcohol, but it will likely taste awful. I have made ginger ...


2

Traditionally belgian tripels / weizen /saison beers are happy to ferment at more temperatures. Higher temperatures lead to higher ester production which results in the 'belgian-ey' flavors of banana and clove (Although I really wouldn't describe it as clove personally) which makes them work better in higher temps. In my experience- you'll get sick of these ...


2

It really depends on the type of beer. Cold crashing isn't necessary, but works better the longer it goes. For a typical ale, I usually wouldn't bother for more than 3 days mostly 'cause I prefer fresh over crystal-clear. However, for something like a lager, going a month really smooths out the beer. I'm guessing that your cold crash range temps are in ...


2

Yes, in my experience, there is still enough active yeast present for about 8 weeks. Beyond that point then I would add just 1-2 grams of fresh yeast. But you're not there yet so I'm sure it will turn out fine with no additional yeast.


2

Quick answer, yes it is possible. Will you get a desirable wine yeast, from grapes maybe, from plums, less likely. Will they ferment a mixture of sugars yes, will it taste good... maybe. There are thousands of species and strains of yeast if not millions, or more. Yes you can plate up isolate and then culture up yeast/bacteria/etc... but you do need to know ...


2

It is certainly possible, but commercially I know only two examples. One is bread that is (was) baked in Vleteren, home of the Struise Brouwers. It was made with the yeast from their Pannepot beer. The other are the pizzas at Otomat, which are baked with Duvel yeast. Does it make a difference in both cases? I really don't know, both taste like bread and ...


2

I'm not aware of any yeast that will pass 20% by any large margin in a pitch-and-forget type of way. Once you start pushing 16+% and you're not using a distillers yeast- you're looking for multi-stage sugar and nutrient additions and it's going to be pretty hands on. Even so- I don't think you're going to get much past 23% If you're just pitching champagne ...


2

Active and dormant are part of the yeast cycle and has nothing to do with sales or packaging. Yeast becomes active when it detects that is in a nutritious environment. Then it starts fermenting. When all nutrients (sugars) have been used up, then the yeast becomes dormant, and then it flocculates out of the solution. When it is liquid dormant, it can be ...


2

Common advice says 0.75 million cells/ml/°P for ales and 1.5 million cells/ml/°P for lagers. However more modern breweries are upping these numbers just a bit. I can say that calculations really only work when you're using a hemacytometer to measure cell count. Any eyeballing or using cell counts on yeast packaging- the math is all out the window.


2

If you view the source of the BF website, there is some packed javascript in there that you can run through an online tool to pretty-print some mathematical calculations used on the site. I've tried using those pitch rate calculators but so much of it is guesswork that it just seems pointless. I have no idea how many billion cells (slurry density) I have in ...


2

Florida man here. You want Kveik. It will happily produce clean beers at temps above 100F (~40C). I've pitched it into 110 degree wort and it thrives. Minimum temperature for it is around the mid 70Fs(~24C). Below 85F(~30C) or so, kveik tends to produce clean fermentations, and behaves like a generic ale yeast imo. In the high 80Fs(~27C) to 100Fs(38C), it ...


1

Put it in the fridge and let it settle a bit, after a few hours (maybe 12) or so you should eventually see layers, with a cream colored cake on the bottom which will be your yeast. It's a little tricker with darker beers as the colors seem to be closer together. While IMO you'll always be better off using a fresh pitch (+ starter) to make sure you've got ...


1

Fast Pitch is just canned worth with a bit of yeast nutrients. The idea is that you can use this as a pre-sterilised worth to make a starter with your liquid yeast before pitching it into the worth. It just takes away the trouble of having to use dme and boil it, cool it down, while making a starter.


1

In addition to the information already provided above: the term "active" yeast (as in Active Dry Yeast) primarily serves to distinguish between "live" yeast suitable for fermentation and inactivated (dead) yeast only suitable for health food supplements, yeast extract production for the food industry and the like. Active yeast is sold in ...


1

I use Lallemand's Kveik dry yeast when it becomes warm in my brew cellar. Over the past year I have brewed IPA's, APA's, ESB's and English ales with Kveik, and all have turned out more than satisfactory. This yeast is rated to ferment up to 39degC, which I find quite incredible. It probably reaches a maximum of 29-30degC in my cellar. I use this yeast ...


1

I don't see the Cuvee yeast addition as being necessary, or perhaps even advisable. The 'second fermentation' of wine is really just a conditioning phase, the main point of racking this off into secondary is to get it off the yeast before it autolyses and dies. Realistically- it likely wouldn't hurt anything too bad. But it probably won't help you. It ...


1

I would re-bottle with carbonated water. One trick you can use is based on the fact that the amount of CO2 (or any gas) which can be dissolved in a liquid increases as it is chilled. If you chill soda water to near zero, it will be visibly far less fizzy. You can pour it between vessels and lose little gas. In practice, simply storing it in a fridge should ...


1

The main enemy of dried yeast is moisture. As long as the yeast remains dry, it remains dormant and preserved. Once it is exposed to moisture in the air, it will begin to absorb said moisture and the shelf life (even when stored at the recommended fridge temperatures of 2-4 degrees Celsius) will start to shift from that of dry yeast to that of liquid yeast. ...


1

Lallemand states: ...must be stored dry, below 4˚C (39˚F). Exposure to humidity and oxygen will affect the viability and vitality of the yeast. Do not use soft packs or sachets that appear to have lost their vacuum. Once a pack or sachet is open, use immediately for best results. If kept sealed (or re-sealed) under vacuum and stored under appropriate ...


1

I have experience with Mangrove Jack's M20 and M29 in high temperature. Last summer, I used them to brew a weizen and saison beer, at temperatures between 25° and 30° C. No off-flavors, although that might also be because the beers I brewed with them were not that big, OG of around 1.040. You could brew other beers than weizen with the M20. Despite it being ...


1

This should be safe to bottle. You used an awful lot of nutrient. I can see that it helped, but you probably only needed about one teaspoon maximum; the rest of it was truly not useful. As such you saw the initial drop from 1.016 to 1.012, and that is as far as it will go. You can prime and bottle the batch now as normal. It should turn out well. You ...


1

Let me simply reinforce what is being said here with a little more focus on history: Lagers are not a storage process. They are a product made with lagering yeasts and fermented at lower temps that typically require refrigeration. The vast majority of craft beers are ales, because ales are fermented at room temperatures and are therefore much less ...


1

Obviously too late to help you, but I've used 3724 extensively and never had the stall after reading an article about saison yeasts by Drew Beechum. He said that 3724 doesn't perform well under pressure and recommended using a sanitized piece of aluminum foil placed loosely over the fermentation vessel. I use a Ss Brewtech bucket and just lay the foil over ...


1

Kveik yeast are also being recommended : Which are the good yeasts and beer styles for fermenting at higher temperatures? It can get as hot as 40º C


1

Live: 795 million cells/ml Dead: 220 million cells/ml Total: 1015 million cells/ml Viability: 78.32% Dilution: 200 Cells needed: Volume: 1135 Litrs, Gravity: 12 and pitching rate: 1 million cells= Pitching rate 12*10^12 per ml. Required slurry??


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible