10

BYO has a pretty good, brief article on what yeast nutrient provides for your beer, as well as whether or not it's necessary. To summarize for you, wort by itself is pretty rich in nutrient, and may not need yeast nutrient, especially if you re-pitch yeast from a previous batch (proper amounts of slurry, of course). The one nutrient that is not present in ...


6

Hibiscus contains hydroxycitric acid. I suspect it had a reaction to metal elements in the yeast nutrient. The product looks like iron chloride in solution to me.


5

You see this mostly in wine, cider and mead making because those sources of fermentable sugars lack some of the nutrients needed by yeast for proper fermentation, which are usually present in malt-based worts. They are (aside from fermentable sugars): Amino acids/nitrogen - All-malt worts supply plenty of readily assimilable nitrogen. This is a big need ...


4

Smack packs contain yeast nutrients, and sugars nothing magical. Its just a mini starter in a bag for proofing yeast for direct pitching. Don't need it at all If doing your own starter. If you do all grain your wort has all the nutrients it needs. Sounds like your 1st stage went fine. I would just step up as normal. At the risk of infection just throw the ...


4

If you have "spritz", which is carbon dioxide gas, then you have fermentation. No need for concern. Ginger beer often will not have the yeast krausen layer on top, the yeast remains suspended within the beer itself until it is finished and then will settle out. All you need now is patience. Just leave it alone. All is well. Cheers, good luck, ...


3

I wouldn't think of these things necessarily food safe. I wouldn't be adding something like this to my beer/mead without knowing what other substances are in it. You are overthinking the oxygenation/aeration process. Aside from using a small O2 tank and stone; people are making excellent mead by simply agitating the must during transfer and/or shaking the ...


3

Banana does have a couple of the nutrients yeast needs. Potassium, folic acid, magnesium etc. Most fruits lack FAN though. That being said bananas wouldn't be a complete replacement for a yeast nutrient product.


3

I can't reach the website from here, but when I search for "does turbo yeast need nutrients" I get a reference stating: Each Turbo Yeast contains a mix of yeast and nutrients, to make 25 L of Wash which would imply that this is tuned to the purpose and that you do not need to add any further nutrients.


3

I currently suggest two things. The first is to check your SG ALSO with a hydrometer. If it has the same readings as your refractometer, there is definitely something off. Also, do you use a refractometer calculator to convert your readings? A refractometer works on the diffraction of light through a drop of fluid. There is a big difference between wort (...


3

My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


3

You're right that dead yeast is a good nutrient for live yeast. The growth medium used for yeast in the lab is YE (yeast extract) plus some sugar. This plan will probably provide some nutrition to the yeast, and work out OK for a few batches, but I think that problems will crop up. You won't actually make yeast extract. Yeast extract is made inducing '...


3

The most common nutrients for mead making, DAP and Fermaid-K or -O, come in powder form. Adding a tsp of each to a 5-gallon batch of mead and mixing well is all it takes. If you see the nutrient doesn't dissolve well you can pre mix it with a little clean water (1/4cup) before adding it in. A normal nutrient regimen is to add small amounts of nutrients (...


2

I'd do the packet. I suppose you run the risk of over pitching, but unlikely. Make sure you rehydrate if the instructions tell you to. On the nutrient, I'd just do a teaspoon. Looks like some people advocate one teaspoon per gallon.


2

Servomyces is simply dead yeast. Prior to being killed, it was fed micronutrients which have been stored in the yeast. There's no harm pitching more into your starter, assuming you then later pitch to 5 gallons or more. If your starter yeast don't use all the nutrients, your main brew certainly will, so there's no harm pitching the entire capsule. The White ...


2

When I make Mead I use brown sugar about 2 table spoons in 10 Liters of honey water mix. I also put light malt into the mix at about 3 parts honey to 1 of Malt. Works well every time. I was looking for natural nutrients and the brown sugar and malt are doing the trick. You can put in more brown sugar if you want.


2

A type of yeast nutrient that I use when I am making hard apple cider uses raisins. Get about 100g of raisins in a saucepan with water that covers them by an inch. Bring them to the boil then simmer them. While simmering mash then to a paste and make a raisin tea. Let it cool and add it to your brew. Make sure the raisins are all natural with no sulphites ...


2

Wort is what determines fermentability in general, not yeast. Almost any ale yeast can easily ferment a 10+% beer. But if you don't make a fermentable wort, the yeast doesn't matter. Many times extract beers are less fermentable due to the way the extract is made. An all grain beer mashed at a high temperature or with large amounts of less fermentable ...


2

5.8% ABV is not considered "higher gravity". There should be no problem S-04 or most any dry or liquid yeast up until closer to 10% ABV. It sounds like your fermentation is either stuck or simply not complete. When did you brew? What size packet of S-04? Did you pitch the whole packet? What fermentation temperature? Did you do anything for aeration/...


2

It's generally recommended that you decant starter wort before pitching. As long as you do that, it doesn't seem you should get any off flavors from it. I simply put some foil loosely over the top of the jug I make starters in.


2

Monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate contain all the same chemical compounds (phosphate ions, ammonium ions, and hydrogen ions), the major difference is that MAP has a second hydrogen in place of the ammonium. So, if you buy food grade stuff, it should be totally safe to consume, however, pH is determined by those hydrogen ions, so your wine may ...


2

Unlikely and it will cost a hell of lot more chasing down the ingredients to put together your own yeast nutrients. I have been brewing for 25 year and have never used them. I had problems brewing when I first started but those were rookie mistakes. If you have enough yeast and wort and oxygen, there shouldn't be anything that stops your yeast from ...


2

Really depends on the apple juice which depends on the soil the trees are grown. I've done size-by-side tests on 1 gallon batches with and without 1/4 tsp each of yeast nutrients (DAP, ammonium sulfate) & 'energizer' using commercial filtered apple juice. Using 1g Lalvin EC-1118 in each, they both fermented fine in the same time and the taste was ...


2

Yes, cider needs a lot of nutrients for healthy yeast growth. Here's a couple ways to get around adding nutrients. Full pitch of yeast. This basically skips a growth phase be case all the needed yeast is there. Usually done by racking juice on top of your last batches yeast trub. Malted Cider in a 50/50 blend wort/Apple juice. This will give yeast all ...


2

As long as you have a suitable supply of yeast nutrients, you can certainly grow non-beer-based yeast cultures for whatever use you need them for. Saccharomyces yeast cultures need the following for successful growth: Assimilable nitrogen. Without a steady supply, yeast can't synthesize protein required for reproduction. Various yeast nutrients can supply ...


2

I have found that the colour of Hybiscus is pH sensitive. At low pH it is red and at higher pH it will turn purple.


2

As a counterpoint, I've done mead batches with zero nutrients, and batches with different levels of nutrients, with success each time. So far I've only used diammonium phosphate (DAP) and Wyeast yeast nutrient in the primary. I've never done additional mixing, and I've never added nutrients partway through the primary, and only recently have I ever added ...


2

You have to use an hydrometer to measure gravity if you want to know what is going on. Foam and airlock bubbling activity is not a precise indication of an active fermentation. Measure gravity before fermentation, and then every 3 days. Usually, 3 days in a row of stable gravity means fermentation is done (or stuck!). When fermentation is done, there is ...


2

You don't need to add any nutrients. I don't use nutrients in any of my ciders and they turn out fantastic. I wouldn't add Vitamin C either. Or even cane sugar, unless you want to make a very strong wine-like product. No additions are needed, just the juice and yeast are all you really need. If you want to add some wild character from grape skins or ...


1

The basics: just mix it up. I've made a few 5-gallon batches of mead, 30-some by this point. When mixing together my must at the start of a batch, I used to use just a big steel spoon to stir the heck out of the must and make sure I worked in a lot of air and got things nice and frothy. Nowadays I use a regular immersion blender, which has the added ...


1

Your nutrient contained phosphate. Most phosphate compounds (besides phosphoric acid and ammonium phosphate) are insoluble. Part of what happened is the phosphate reacting chemically with other ions in the mead, causing the darkening effect which then settled out over time. So your update above makes perfect sense. David M. Taylor B.S. Chemical ...


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