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7

There are a number of objective, quantifiable differences between yeast strains. Temperature range. Beer yeasts are roughly categorized into lager and ale strains. All lager strains work best at low (~500 F.) temperatures, while ale strains work best closer to room temperature (~680 F.). But within either of these categories, different yeasts have different ...


4

I'd say you were too impatient. There's no reason to assume that the pack will inflate that fast. The ROT is to give it one day for every week past manufacture. So even if the pack was only a couple weeks old, that would have been at least to days for it to inflate. And 8 hours in a starter is too soon to determine there's no activity. The packs might ...


4

Smack packs contain yeast nutrients, and sugars nothing magical. Its just a mini starter in a bag for proofing yeast for direct pitching. Don't need it at all If doing your own starter. If you do all grain your wort has all the nutrients it needs. Sounds like your 1st stage went fine. I would just step up as normal. At the risk of infection just throw the ...


4

Well, kind of....WY1056, WLP001 and US-05 all had the same original source, but through time and the process of drying 05, they've diverged a bit. 1056 and 001 are very clean, with the main differences being mouthfeel. US-05 is not as clean and has a tendency to throw a peach/apricot ester that I and others find disagreeable. But it's pretty much as close ...


4

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


3

The smack pack should have inflated in the six hours between breaking the nutrient seal and opening it. If it didn't, that's an indication that the yeast are not working at full strength. If you don't see any fermentation 48 hours after pitching, the yeast has almost certainly failed. Your beer is at the greatest risk for infection before the yeast is ...


3

Nope. Keep your priming sugars the same. Explanation: The sugars we usually use for carbonation is 100% (or near 100%) fermentable. Thus, it will cause the same amount of carbonation.


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Nope, you don't need to change a thing.


3

The Wyeast smack packs have a small nutrient pouch inside the main pouch (which contains the yeast slurry). The nutrients will cause the yeast to "wake up" and consume the sugars in the nutrient liquid, causing the swelling. However, this is a function not only of the yeast, but also of the date of manufacture, the viability/vitality of the yeast and the ...


2

Yeast strains have many different properties, primarily related to the types of flavor and aroma compounds they produce, the effect of fermentation temperatures, pitch rates and re-pitching, alcohol tolerance, flocculation and even what types of sugars they can consume. For instance, the "Dupont" saison strain (Wyeast 3724) is described: A traditional ...


2

Fermentation time will depend on a lot of factors...if you want to compare to Wyeast, you need to specify which strain. 05 and 1056 ferment in about the same amount of time. but 05 often takes longer to drop clear. I think 05 -may- ferment a bit faster than 04, but no guarantees. The difference in flavor between 04 and 05 is dramatic.


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if people are still wondering about these results.. both of these strains were found to be S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus and contain the gene that allows them to chop up dextrins and do this very slowly. Basically you end up with lower FG's than you would expect based on the target and recipe procedure. I was myself wondering if people have bottle ...


2

From the picture it looks like normal yeast clumps to me. Sometimes you get dried krausen falling back in the beer and it doesn't really dissolve and settle out. Its hard to say looking at an internet picture, but that's what it looks like to me.


2

Assuming you're talking about Wyeast, they recommend incubating '3-5 hours or more' after smacking. You certainly can wait days, and in fact may have to for older or poorly stored yeast packs, but it generally shouldn't be necessary. Is there somewhere you've read that recommends incubating for days, or is it just more a general question? "Does the yeast ...


2

I was able to find at least one paper in which a standardized wort was used to classify many (153) yeast strains based on, among four other parameters, degree of attenuation. The wort used was an 'All-malt hopped wort (specific gravity 1040, pH 5.0, attenuation limit ca. 1006) [...] prepared according to [another paper]...' This second paper referenced ...


2

I have veiwed a few papers and this one contained similar proportions to other references but was the only one to contain a reference for the source of the proportions. Isolation and Characterization of Brewer's Yeast Variants with Improved Fermentation Performance under High-Gravity Conditions Which references: 8.6.1 Fermentability, Attenuation Limit of ...


2

Looks just like a little bit rushed for the total schedule. It wouldn't have hurt the beer any to let it finish out at the warmer temp of 60F. Instead your data shows you started to chill it back down while it was finishing. In the future, take a sample and taste it before chilling to lagering temp. Take a sample and microwave it for 30 seconds and that ...


1

Short Answer: Oxygenation or Yeast Did you stir it enough to oxygenate the wort? Did you use enough yeast (you must have, sorry answered this one for you)? How did you store the yeast? Yeast age? Longer Answer: Diacetyl is made at the start of fermentation by the yeast and is absorbed towards the end of the fermentation. A brew that a weak yeast or ...


1

Obviously too late to help you, but I've used 3724 extensively and never had the stall after reading an article about saison yeasts by Drew Beechum. He said that 3724 doesn't perform well under pressure and recommended using a sanitized piece of aluminum foil placed loosely over the fermentation vessel. I use a Ss Brewtech bucket and just lay the foil over ...


1

The Saison strains are very sensitive to CO2 toxicity. Most of the CO2 produced during fermentation escapes out the airlock but some of it does dissolve into the beer. (A taste test of a small sample of any fermented beer will be slightly carbonated as a result of this). Swirling the fermentor occasionally during the fermentation process agitates the ...


1

You say you "need it for Tokyo"? If you're patient Advanced Brewing ships specialty yeasts in Japan, though they don't update their stocks so you'll need to check with them to see what they have available by trying to place an order first. I've also been impatient myself and used alternate strains as replacements. In my research I've found that many strains ...


1

When can you get the yeast? I would definitely not go for it if you're not going to be able to let it get started at all. If you can get the yeast a day or two in advance and get it partially started then you're more likely to avoid off flavors. Even if you have to cut it a little short. You might try buying a couple packs and giving those a short start. ...


1

I just finished a saison using 3724. Gravity went from 1.055 to 1.009. I used the amount of priming sugar for 3.2 volumes, and after 1.5 weeks in bottles they are VERY carbonated. I was thinking I might dial mine back next time. However, I don't think you are in danger of making bottle bombs just from the bottling sugar, so I would say just try them out in ...


1

The ferm times were about the same. What was different was the taste. An UNBELIEVABLE difference. It really doesn't taste like the same beer. You really wouldn't know it was the same beer in fact. I preferred the 04, but many did prefer the 05. Anyway, I use the brews now to show folks the difference yeast makes as most don't really consider it as important ...


1

A pack that does not inflate could be ok. Some strains are slower to start. But, if you made a starter and there's still no activity, the yeast may be inactive. I wouldn't risk it in my batch. I'd get another pack or 2. Maybe throw in a dry yeast.


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