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You may be interested in Wood Toxicity and Allergen Chart presented at The Wood Database. With very important warning: Just because any given wood is not listed on the chart, does not mean that it is completely safe to use. It simply means that adverse reactions have not been reported as of yet. That said, there is over 200 kinds of wood in this one ...


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Over the weekend I kept thinking about this and I have done a bit more digging and found this article from bear-flavored.com, in which they speak about brewing with 4 different woods and discovered this company Black Swan Cooperage who make barrels and aging additions out of 8 different woods listed below: Cherry - Butter brickle, ripe cherry, fresh grass, ...


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The question of how much to add and how long is like asking how much salt to put into your food. It depends on the food and your taste. That's why the recommendations you've come across vary so widely. Remember that it's all about balance: the more massively bodied and flavored your beer is, the more oaking you can get away with. In an impy stout you can ...


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It will not dry out in two week. It had hard alcohol in it which pretty much kills anything. When I empty wine barrels, we literally wash them out with hot water and drip dry for a couple days. We burn sulfur in them to sanitize them but that's wine and not hard alcohol. I have left wine barrels empty with a bung in them up to six months. So, in my expert ...


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We had a similar tradition in Balkans as well, we just used "Rakija" (grape moonshine) instead of Vodka. We used glass demijohns instead of oak casks when storing the spirit and burying it into the grounds. After 20 years the biggest problem was usually finding where demijohn was burried :D In any case, I do know for a fact that we did not use wooden ...


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I would stick to the wood chips that are available from your homebrew supplier. There is a large selection available. One may be temped to cut up an old liquor barrel or cubing a known safe species of wood. But care needs to be taken not to contaminate the wood with the cutting tool, saws have coatings and oils etc. The chips made for brewing have been ...


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The type, roast and cut (i.e. surface area) of the wood has a huge impact on the amount of wood flavor you get, and the length of time changes not only amount of flavor, but the types. Start with a specific type of wood species, toasting level and cut that you easily get in for the foreseeable future. if you can split a batch into smaller fermenters and do ...


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You don't use charcoal for this. There are actually two different steps. In the first step, you could use charcoal to smoke your malt, make a mash from this malt, ferment it and then distil it. And after distillation you would age the whiskey in barrels. What this video shows is actually to replace the ageing in barrels, with ageing already made whiskey over ...


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