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I see two possibilities: The second recipe has an unrealistic final gravity and most likely isn't finished fermenting. Fruit has very simple sugars, with final gravities typically 0.992 to 0.999 regardless of yeast strain used in most cases, so unless there was a more complex sugar added, or an unfermentable sugar like lactose or maltodextrin, the second ...


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The sugar will be consumed - up to a point. I have no experience making orange wine with cane sugar, but yeast can only convert just so much sugar to alcohol before the alcohol level becomes self-toxic. The amount depends on the yeast. I have used this technique to great advantage making mead, where simply varying the about of honey in the ferment takes ...


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With only two data points, the only thing you can conclude with any real confidence is that there is simply more dissolved sugar in a beverage with a higher finishing gravity. In the above example (again it's only two data points), it could be suggesting this particular yeast tops-out at around 8.8% AbV, because the second set of readings still retain quite ...


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Your question is a little vague, but I think I know what you are getting at. The smoothness you refer to is about biological, chemical, and physical control of oxidation which is impacted from the very beginning, through fermentation, as much as it is by ageing. For beer, Kunze describes ageing as resulting from oxidation of products from various reactions. ...


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