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"should add campden tablets before bottling wine" might be a bit of an exaggeration, though they can be beneficial in case you want an extra insurance that nothing will go wrong while your wine ages in bottles. You can add the tablets as little as 30 minutes before you bottle. I wouldn't do it too long before bottling though, as that could also ...


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I'm not aware of any yeast that will pass 20% by any large margin in a pitch-and-forget type of way. Once you start pushing 16+% and you're not using a distillers yeast- you're looking for multi-stage sugar and nutrient additions and it's going to be pretty hands on. Even so- I don't think you're going to get much past 23% If you're just pitching champagne ...


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Probably should point out that activity like bubbles in the airlock doesn't always equate to active feremenation. In fact, it should be only be regarded as a suggestion that active fermentation may be happening. Depending on temperature, strain, available sugars and other factors, yeast can be working away and you may see very little bubbling in the airlock. ...


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The browning is actually enzymatic browning because of the breakdown of the banana cells. There is no such thing as too brown, but out of experience I know that brown and soft bananas could get mouldy. The mechanism which turns the banana starches into sugars is actually the same as that in brewing beer. Amylases (amylase enzymes), in this case alpha-amylase ...


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You don't have to add Campden, only if your recipe calls for it or if you plan to age your wine and preserve it for a longer period of time. Remember that metabisulphite is naturally present in grape must and its purpose is to protect your wine from oxygen. The recommended amount of free SO2 in a wine is between 25mg/L and 50mg/L which can be tricky to ...


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It will be safe to use and non-toxic. The maximum lead content is a maximum, and the one specified here is within safe limits. Breathing the air downwind from a coal-fired power station typically exposes you to more lead than this stuff, when used in the regular amounts. One Campden tablet typically contains 0.44 g each of sodium metabisulphite (plus filler/...


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It will vary a lot. For instance one big difference between cheap, medium and expensive wine kits is how much liquid they give you i.e. how concentrated it is. Is this is your product: https://www.wilko.com/wilko-red-grape-juice-concentrate-250ml/p/0483794 Reviews seem to claim it's for up to 20L of wine which seems a little implausible to me. As mentioned ...


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I don't see the Cuvee yeast addition as being necessary, or perhaps even advisable. The 'second fermentation' of wine is really just a conditioning phase, the main point of racking this off into secondary is to get it off the yeast before it autolyses and dies. Realistically- it likely wouldn't hurt anything too bad. But it probably won't help you. It ...


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Do you have time and patience? Because that is what helps making your wine nice. I make every year wine from my own grapes, and after fermentation, I put it in a cool place. This way, the wine clears, and a whole amount of tartaric acid drops out. This lowers the acidity of the wine. But that takes a month or six. Refermenting will not increase your pH. The ...


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Using a coin reasonably smaller than the 18.5mm diameter to reduce the pressure and spread out the force over a larger area is another hack. https://www.winemakingtalk.com/threads/dimple-on-top-of-cork.6484/


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Possibly, but you need patience it seems/ It is probably because of the baking soda that your wine tastes like this. You can't remove the molecules that are responsible for this anymore from your wine. However, I read that this is readily used, but you need a month or two for the results of this addition to drop out from the wine. I have made wine already ...


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If I understand correct, then amylase powder is used to turn rice into sugar? 40° Brix is a gravity of 1.180. Champagne yeast can endure a lot, but starting from this amount of sugar would lead to an ABV of 23.6%, if your yeast could endure that. I find champagne yeasts of 15%. So yes, your yeast has had a good time, but the alcohol level is too high. I ...


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