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16

It will vary, but to give you a benchmark, you can use this Brewer's Friend Calculator to play with the variables of amount of grain, gravity and volume of beer. For example, if I plug in 100 liters as the volume, 1.050 as the measured gravity (this isn't really important - it just calculates pre-boil efficiency), and choose 25kg of American Pilsner malt, ...


3

I believe the term "distiller" fits the bill for what you are describing. Zymurgy (also called Zymology) applies to the scientific, technical, or academic study of fermentation (and some would include distilling), and not necessarily to the making of alcoholic beverages. However, many homebrewers self-style themselves as "zymurgists". Furthermore, the well-...


3

If you're in the US, the very first thing you should do is engage a lawyer who specializes in this.


3

You need a legal expert but here are just a few of the things you will need to worry about 1. federal and state liscencing 2. trademarking 3. land rights and water rights Are you talking about buying a distillery or building one? because each has its own slew of problems.


3

Your question is like saying "how long is a piece of string?". But here's one way to look at it....on average, at 100 % efficiency, a lb. of base grain in a gal. of water will give you 36 gravity points, or an OG of 1.036. Assuming 75% efficiency, about average for most brewers, you'd get 25 ppg (points/pound/gal.) or an OG of 1.025 for one gallon. So, ...


2

well it depends on the style, so I might make a whole grain ale that is very pale and assuming a good conversion ratio and easy math figure of 1lb per gallon. liter is about 1/4 gallon, so 1/4 pound. round up a little and call that 125g. of course working with such a small amount you will likely get much worse conversion, and you could probably just double ...


2

It depends. Mostly, on what would you consider / be willing to call a whiskey. All sources I was able to find claim things like this: American whiskey is a distilled beverage produced in the United States from a fermented mash of cereal grain. Above quote is from Wikipedia - not most reliable, true, but easiest to link to. You can check it's references - ...


2

According to this ProBrewer page about whiskey distillation, the initial mash is 100Kg of malted barley and 600 litres of water, for a 6:1 ratio. This yields 80 - 87 litres of 80 proof spirit. As for the waste, U.S. 2-row malt has an extract potential of 79%, so 21% of the malt (modulo conversion efficiency), by weight, is not converted to sugar. That would ...


1

You don't use charcoal for this. There are actually two different steps. In the first step, you could use charcoal to smoke your malt, make a mash from this malt, ferment it and then distil it. And after distillation you would age the whiskey in barrels. What this video shows is actually to replace the ageing in barrels, with ageing already made whiskey over ...


1

It may all depend on the volume of spirits you are trying to age. There is a difference is ageing and when the spirits are bottled. How long does it take to age your own whiskey? This is a tricky questions to answer, as it can take anywhere from 2 weeks to several years. However, small batch distillers definitely have the advantage here. When you are ...


1

I never made whiskey nor brandy, but what I have seen is people forcing aging using charred wood chips and cooling/heating cycles. This way the whiskey will penetrante the wood chips when it's heated and then leave it when it's cold (or the other way around), doing this a couple of times you can get a decent amount of "aging", of course it will not be real ...


1

I was unable to find a word for the "study of distillation". Also, to be clear, "zymurgy" is the study of fermentation, not necessarily beermaking.


1

To sort of answer part of your question, in making scotch whiskey for example, the wort is fermented into a "Wash", which is double-distilled into a "new make spirit" containing 60-70% abv., which is then diluted with water to approximately 63.5% abv before being put into barrels for aging. Source: Wikipedia.


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