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10

Flaked wheat is raw wheat - it's not been malted. This means that the enzymes that would normally help convert the starches to sugars have not even been created yet, since this is one affect of malting. "Normal" wheat is also called "red" wheat, due to the slight reddish hue it has. The grain is malted, and so has the ability to convert it's own starches ...


8

I would think not. SMaSH means single malt and a single hops. The point is simplicity and purity, where emphasize the flavor of a single malt and single hops. Adding additional ingredients will change the attributes of the beer, which will means that it is no longer a single malt. But IMO, the more important question is why do you care? Beer is a beverage ...


7

Sounds like what you're smelling is some sort of sulfur compound. That's pretty common with that particular strain of yeast. It will eventually age out. How long ago did you brew the beer? What temp did it ferment at?


6

'Does that mean that wheat decreases shelf life[?]' In certain instances, yes. Higher-protein wheat can lead to haze instability (you probably don't care in a wheat beer but you might in other styles). The proteins may also lead to flavor instability, for instance in the presence of dying yeast cells (the yeast excrete an enzyme [protease] into the beer ...


5

What yeast did you use? Most Hefeweizen yeasts are known for strong sulfur production, and as you noticed, it usually drops out. My rule of thumb is to wait for the sulfur to completely dissipate before I bottle or keg the beer. I get sulfur from WLP 300 & 380, but I had a sulfur BOMB on a batch with 351, I even posted a question here about it: Strong ...


4

First thing's first Bubbles are not an absolute indicator of fermentation. The most reliable way to tell if your fermentation is "done" is to use a hydrometer, and once you find you are getting consistent gravity over several days, then it has finished digesting sugars (still technically fermenting). Fermenting Hot, and what it means Fermenting on the ...


3

I do BIAB, and I don't think protein rest has much with extraction efficiency. Mashout temperature has, however: if wort has lower viscosity due to higher temperature, it will better flow from the grist. Another thing I do is "micro-sparge" with 1-2 liters of water over the grain bag (in my case it's a basket, actually) on top of the kettle. When it comes ...


3

By watery, I assume you mean the body is lacking. You can typically tell how much body you're going to have by the final gravity reading. You're on the lower end of 1.012, which means it's ~12 gravity points above what plain water would be, so technically it isn't a whole lot but it is definitely noticeable (and frankly, about standard for a wheat beer). ...


2

I'm thinking you can. I was wondering the same thing last month. I had 7.5 lbs. of white wheat malt on hand and mashed it by itself. I used the brew in a bag method since I was concerned about a stuck sparge. Worked great.


2

White wheat and flaked wheat are both adjuncts and should be used in conjunction with a base malt (like wheat malt). From John Palmer's book on the former two adjuncts: Unmalted wheat is a common ingredient in wheat beers, including: American Wheat, Bavarian Weisse, and is essential to Belgian Lambic and Wit. It adds starch haze and high levels of protein....


2

Torrefied wheat can sometimes be drier, and create a good head without haziness in the beer. But if you are only using a few hundred grams / 4-8oz and not brewed the recipe before then relax, your beer will still be fine. If you have brewed it before, you might find the beer doesn't taste as crisp/dry as before.


2

Either way will work and not make much difference. However, if you steep at 180 you'll denature the enzymes that convert the starches to sugar. The steep should be done between 145-160F for best results.


2

According to Drew Beecham's article in November/December 2012 Zymurgy and associated presentation (subscription required), the term SMaSH was coined on homebrewtalk.com and, of course means, Single Malt and Single Hop. Your question highlights part of the problem with SMaSH recipes...they can be boring or lacking a quality you desire. So although adding an ...


2

I tried wheat and rye only twice. First time I put all my grain thorough beta-glucan and protein rests. There was little to no foam. Second time, I did it only on unmalted grain, malted rye and malted wheat, adding barley later. And it worked like a charm. And maybe it's only placebo effect, but I think it tasted better. Grain is relatively cheap. If you ...


1

If the grist contains unmalted grains, typically the brewing process is to first cook the grains to their gelatinisation point. The gelatinisation temperature of wheat is about 51°C → 64°C (125°F → 147°F), which is a typical mash temperature. So unmalted wheat should gelatise in the mash without any special treatment. As part of the flaking process, the ...


1

Generally a SMASH is a simple recipe to experiment with a single ingredient at a time To be true to the acronym one would only be able to play with base malts and bittering hops. But this isn't the case. IMO it was never intended to be strict to the acronyms meaning. Single malt, single hop. But rather single malt, single hop aside from a well known base ...


1

I would do the whole grist as part of the rest. Just make sure your bag is not touching the bottom when you heat up the mash. There shouldn't be a problem


1

How can you ascribe it to the wheat? IPA also is much better fresh and young and has no wheat. I think it's more due to yeast character, but you'd have to define what it is you don't like abut them.


1

There's a few smells you should worry about, because you're smelling the liquid. For instance, a vinegary smell (suggests acetobacter infection). There are other smells that you should not worry about, because you're smelling the gas leaving the liquid. For instance, sulphur. Most smells during fermentation are in this category, actually. Remember, you don'...


1

The flavor will be very slightly different. Probably not enough to notice unless you did a side by side with the same beer made with torrified.


1

For a very precise answer, there is actually a paper published in the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers journal ('Water Absorbtion Characteristics of Wheat and Barley During Soaking' Transactions of the ASABE. Vol. 46(2): 361–366 . (doi: 10.13031/2013.12916) @2003) The abstract reads: Water absorption characteristics of wheat and ...


1

It sounds like it will be watery, though carbonation will add some mouthfeel so it depends on what you mean by watery. Usually, prior to carbonation, the beer will taste sweeter and a bit thicker. This might be a bit much, but there's a lot of good information here and on the first two links from this page: http://www.bjcp.org/course/...


1

I had the same problem with 351. I stick with 380 now, the sulfur clears much quicker. For my hefe with 351, the flavor eventually went away, but it was in a secondary, not a keg. I think you should do what you're thinking: bring it to room temp and vent it regularly. Maybe give it a good swirl to get any yeast back into suspension.


1

A few years late but for future reference. I see most have answered the question with correct info regarding enzymes but there are ways. But really it boils down to this (no pun intended) using only malted wheat will make the beer very white pale, with a very dry finish, the mash will have little flavour aside from a soft flour like taste. The proteins are ...


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