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5

If the cider is really turning into vinegar, than you've got a bacterial infection, probably acetobacter. This bacteria will metabolize alcohol into acetic acid. Acetobacter is present in small quantities in apple juice. It's also carried by fruit flies. There are three things you can do to fix this. Observe proper sanitation technique. Anything the ...


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


5

The Mad Fermentationist has a good write-up on making malt vinegar. Some interesting points from the article: oxygen is key to the process so you don't want to use an airlock. A cheesecoth, or a coffee-filter over the neck of the carboy work well to keep bugs and dust out but let oxygen in. vinegar can be made from the acetobacter in the air, but this may ...


3

First off all... If you're new to this, relax. There's a few sensible precautions to take that make a difference - sanitise your equipment before hand, keep it upside down when empty, keep your brew covered when not actively using it, start with either a bought yeast / bug, or a starter from a friend / trusted source. Do all these and you'll almost certainly ...


3

Simply exposing a wine that was inoculated with wine yeast to oxygen doesn't create acetic acid. You need to inoculate with some acetic acid bacteria as well. Acetic acid bacteria can ferment both sugars and ethanol to make acetic acid. I have made red wine before, and I have pulled a gallon of partially fermented wine, inoculated with acetobacter and ...


3

Star-San is the best answer -- BUT: DO NOT use it after, ie: so as to clean and store for later use. Star-San is acidic and prolonged/sustained contact will make your plastic brittle and break (I have broken a siphon tube like this after only a few months of doing this afterbrew sanitizing). Use Star-San ONLY just before use for anything plastic/vinyl (...


2

My first batch ever was the brewers best english brown ale kit (extract). At some point it became infected and went sour. I let the bottles sit to see if it would age out (didn't know any better at the time) and the whole batch slowly turned in to carbonated vinegar. I've used it for pulled pork and it has worked wonders on it. I still have some left and ...


2

ALL IS NOT LOST!!!! I had a similar problem with a distinctly vinegar flavour to my apple cider having left it maybe two days too long in the fermenter. With Scottish blood flowing through my Kiwi veins, I couldn't stand the thought of it going to waste, so I boiled 2/3rds of the cider-vinegar to 70 degrees C (killing just enough yeast to sufficiently ...


2

I own and operate a vinegar company: Beer style certainly effects the process and outcome of fermented vinegar. Vinegar bacteria is as unique as your environment, some strains being more aggressive or tolerable than others. Preference with style is only dependent on how much home-brew you may mess up or what your desired end-flavor may be. Lighter beers ...


2

To my knowledge there is no preferred beer style that is preferred for making malt vinegar - it is just that it can be brewed from malt. No hops are added to malt solutions used for fermenting, for example so it would be difficult to call the base liquor a "beer". Traditionally beer per se is not usually used for making vinegar. "Vin gar" bad wine is usually ...


1

Vinegar has a fairly distinctive flavour. If you can't taste it, I would say no. During fermentation, the yeast rapidly uses-up all the dissolved oxygen in the vessel. Acetobacter needs oxygen to turn ethanol into vinegar. So as long as your air lock was in-place, the fermentation will maintain a positive pressure of carbon dioxide. So there should be ...


1

I wouldn't. I've warped an Auto-siphon that way.


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The test for acetobacter is simple: smell whatever's coming out of the airlock on your fermenter. If it smells like vinegar, you've got bacterial contamination ["an infection"] :). For a fermentation in progress, there's only a couple of options. You could pasteurize the whole batch, which would kill off bacteria as well as the yeast, so you'd have to ...


1

You can make vinegar from any alcoholic beverage. Since there is a one-to-one ratio between ethanol and acetic acid production, use or dilute your beverage to 5-7% alcoholic strength. This is the concentration of commercially bought vinegar, usually five percent. While Acetobacter bacteria are present in the air and is carried by the vinegar fly, the use of ...


1

Yes, you can make it with a vinegar mother or leaving it alone, with cheesecloth to keep out the flies. If you want a mother, you can get them a lot of places, even Amazon. Wine Spectator (or all places) has a great blurb on it: How do you make homemade red wine vinegar? Wine Spectator If you think it hasn't been hit by bugs carrying acetobacter or ...


1

Infection mixed with oxygenation during fermentation makes for vinegar. What does your cleaning and sanitation process consist of on the cold side? Do you use a spoon rest? What are you fermenting in? What do you use for an airlock?


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My answer to a question like this is to ask the question, when was the last time you tasted vinegar? Vinegar is a lot harder to make accidentally than you think. I mean yes it’s one way to spoil a wine and being extraordinarily careless will do it, but you generally have to try to make vinegar. Chances are better than the wine is young and it had more of a ...


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Rehydrate your yeast separately before pitching. Match temperatures before you pitch. Refer to instructions on the back of Lalvin packet. Temperature shocking the yeast could kill some of them or cause them to hibernate, leaving wild yeast and bacteria to take over and out-compete. Sanitize all your jars. You boiled the water, but did you sanitize the jar ...


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