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22

Well as you asked for 'tips', I've used the following to both dislodge stubborn material from the inside of tubes, and to remove excess water which aids drying: It's a stainless steel brake cable from a bicycle, with a peice of towelling skewered on the end. The one I used was just over 2 meters long. I sterilise the whole thing, and just 'drag' it through ...


11

For cleaning, if you're able to get all the debris out with water and a cleanser then I wouldn't worry about it. I usually give the stubborn stuff a good soak in warm PBW, then flush with hot water. Worst case scenario, I use a bottle brush or dip tube brush. For drying, the two most common methods are hanging and blowing out with an air compressor. There'...


4

I've also never had a real problem with my tubing. Always rinse immediately after using with hot water and then hang up... I typically forget About Them until next time I need them. At that point is another rinse and Starsan soak.


3

I take a sponge and cut a 1.5 inch long and width is approximately the ID of my hose. I stuff this into my hose (wet it first) then stick it in my faucet and let the water pressure push the sponge through the hose. Do this a couple times and any little fragments that may be stuck on inside of the tube come loose. I do it right after I use it before it has ...


3

If you picked up vinyl smell from fresh tubing it won't leave the mead. It may fade in time, but along with some of the other good smells in the mead too, because it will take a long time. And in a closed container that aroma isn't going anywhere.


3

Nope. ID really all that matters with respect to line-length resistance and system tuning. The OD does not matter, though it does make me question what type of material the tubing is … which would also affect line-length resistance…?


3

I mounted an empty, plastic speaker wire spool to the wall in my brewing closet (room under the stairs where I kept all my brewing equipment) to hang all the tubing on. I made sure to mount it high enough on the wall that I didn't have to coil the tubing around the spool. This allowed the tubing to dry well and kept off the ground and out of my way. The ...


2

The link to the tubing you posted says the tubing rating is 250psi, and a barb with a clamp would surely tolerate at least 60psi, but I don't think figuring out the maximum pressure the system can safely handle is the way to go. Instead, ensure that your adjustable valve has a maximum pressure so that it that opens when the pressure goes above a threshold ...


2

I mounted a garden hose tidy to the wall - it's semicircular and not too deep. I hang all the tubes from that. It allows them to drip dry and gives easy access. (It's late here, I'll post a picture during daylight.)


2

It's the design that makes them different. Tri-clamp / tri-clover are the simplest design, and have been a lab and medical clamp for very long time. While they take a little skill to flip on, they are by far the best style of fitting. Cam locks are not a sanitary fitting by spec, mainly because of the moving hinge area that can come in contact with the "...


1

They step down in size to help prevent overcarbonation at the end of the line. For when a keg is on a jockey box for several hours at above normal pressures. Beer flows easier and with less pushing pressure the larger the line is. The more diameter step downs to the final diameter at the tap the better. This is why you will see many jockey boxes start at ...


1

Tri-Clamp fittings are the only types of fittings which are approved by 3A organization. 3-A SSI is an independent, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to advancing hygienic equipment design for the food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries. The reason these fittings are approved is two-fold: Their design minimizes/eliminates the areas where harmful ...


1

You could use electrical tape, it comes in different colors and it would resist washing. The color would be your code to designate its purpose and length. I have no other ideas for now, anyone else?


1

Without knowing what size piping or tri-clamp you're working with, you could probably go with 1/2" pipe mounts or many of the options I found here. There's a lot of options for securing pipes to your wall — what would probably help you most is to figure out what your requirements are for securing the pipe and/or TC. Size, mobility, etc.


1

Do you have an open wallspace? Perhaps you could hang the tubing in a coil (and perhaps your canes, brushes, etc as well), as one might with tools in a garage?


1

I flush with hot water, initially from one end of the tubing, and then, from the other end. After doing this for three years, I have yet to detect debris in the tubing. Back in the day, before adopting this procedure, I would occasionally detect signs of mold, which would necessitate a squirt of bleach, resulting in the mold promptly disappearing. This ...


1

I always keep two 5 gallon buckets on hand when I'm brewing. One filled with PBW and one filled with Sanitizer. Before the hoses come in contact with my cooled wort, they soak in PBW the entire time I'm brewing up the beer. I make these buckets at the very beginning of the brew day. When the time comes to use them, I attach to my autosiphon and run a few ...


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