6

I would get the wort into the fermenter with the yeast and then carefully transport it. Then you don't have to worry about the wort getting contaminated as much due to the airlock on the fermenter. The head space should be able to handle the sloshing from moving it (I am assuming that this is in a car). I would just make sure that it isn't going to go ...


5

Here is a neat article about the Beer clarification process: Clarification of Beer: Advanced Brewing . The article is about beer, but they derive a rough formula estimating it will take about 88 hours for yeast to settle 1 meter in beer. If the the yeast is only disturbed to a height of .1 meters is should take around 8 to 9 hours to settle. Cider is less ...


5

Depends on how well settled the sediment is to begin with. The key is to keep the bottles upright so that the surface of the liquid remains in the confined space in the neck. Assuming normal flat roadways, you should be fine. How long it will take for the bottles to settle back down if they do get stirred up is subject to how stirred up they get and how ...


4

If anything it likely helped get them carbonated faster. Assuming you let the sediment that gets stirred up by moving settle before drinking, there is no harm in moving bottles.


4

If the beer is overcarbonated, I'd just degas it. Lift the cap of each bottle, let the CO2 escape until the foam reaches the cap, let go; repeat as many times as necessary, waiting for the foam to fall back between each degassing. It can take a couple dozen sessions over several days to reach the desirable/safe carbonation level. If the beer is not cooled ...


4

Go ahead and move it. You won't oxidize the beer - the headspace is already filled with co2, and the yeast will scavenge any oxygen that does make it into the beer.


3

No problem on fermenter transport. Fermentation will still be going so no worries about oxidation. But I'd recommend a bucket rather than a carboy. Unbreakable.


2

24 hours in, I don't think you have much to worry about. As mdma suggested, you still have active yeast that would gladly clean out any oxygen that finds its way into the beer. That said, I would either move the fermenter very soon or not at all. The vast majority of your fermentation is going to happen in the first 2-3 days. That period of most active ...


2

Liquid yeast will survive for many days, and probably weeks, outside of being refrigerated. No need to overthink this. The yeast will be just fine until you get home. Cheers.


2

I ended up transporting the bottles in a following set up: put bottles to a plastic bucket and filled the space beetween them with insides of an old pillow. I packed the buckets to car in a way they could not move. It worked quite well, none of the bottles exploded but I also drived quite carefully.


1

While inquiring with the FAA or other appropriate authorities is the only way to get a proper answer to that question, offhand my thought would be "No." Star San is a blend of phosphoric acid and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid. Since acids are classified (under aviation and other regulations) as corrosive liquids I expect this would not be allowed. Whether or ...


1

It will be fine. Just keep it covered from light and cool. Make sure your air-lock doesn't lose it's fluid in the move. Only concern is if your changing elevation from high to low by 2-3k feet, you may suck in fluid from the air-lock. If this is the case just cover the fermentor with sanatized foil, use a lot and try to go down the sides 3-5 inches from the ...


1

Two things. You can delay the wine but picking and freezing the flowers. Should not effect the flavor or quality. Second thing, a demijohn, carboy or whatever is like a giant bottle so in effect if you have all your chemistry (sulfites and such) at the right levels and you can move the demijohn with care, it should change nothing. The caveat to that is if ...


1

I make bottle conditioned beers all the time and have never (touch wood) had a problem with them clouding up during transportation. Unless you are hauling the over dirt tracks in the back of a truck you should have no problems.


1

You say the caps were "firmly on". No offense, but if they're leaking the caps weren't fully sealed. Possible culprits could be the bottles or caps you use, your capper, or your technique. we need to know more about what you do and how you do it to narrow that list down.


1

It sounds like you're not getting a good seal on the caps. Do you notice carb loss over time? Do they leak when you simply tip them upside down? If so, it could be any number of things: the capper, your technique or the bottle itself (e.g. twist off rather than pry-off).


1

Were you using plastic pet bottles? If you use soda bottles some of them have a blue plastic seal under the cap which acts like a washer when you screw the cap down. If the cap is old the plastic seal may not be effective. Another option is that some plastic bottles do not use the blue plastic seal so you have to be careful as the what bottles go with ...


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