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9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


8

There are several things to consider here. Certainly slowing down your boil will change your rate of evaporation, but that's only a problem if you're having a hard time hitting your target volumes. The main consideration is your bitterness contribution from hops. Alpha acid isomerization, like most chemical reactions, is temperature dependent. It happens at ...


5

Bottle priming takes typically 2 weeks, depending upon temperature and yeast health. The bottles should initially be stored at room temperature so the yeast can produce CO2 from the priming sugar, which takes 2-3 days. If you opened the bottle then, you'd get a loud hiss and flat beer, since all the CO2 is in the headspace. After the CO2 is produced, it ...


4

One week is Usually enough time to finish carbonating, however I've found that you get much better results if you wait at least two weeks. Bottle bombs are typically the result of one of three things Incomplete Fermentation Infection Too much bottling sugar If you made sure fermentation was complete, had no signs of infection and made sure you used the ...


1

I wouldn't risk piching your expired yeast for a kolsch, this is a style that should have very low, subtle to no yeast esters. Your old yeast may be still have a partial viable cell count, but it would produce too many growth esters for the style. If this was a style that has strong ester profile (belgian, wiezen etc). I would pitch the old yeast in hopes ...


1

I would just keep it refrigerated. If your new yeast are to arrive in two or three days, it'll be faster than testing old one. And assuming old one is dead, keeping wort at fermentation temperature is far worse than keeping it refrigerated. It's already chilled, keep it that way. What I would try to do, and I hope you did if it was possible, would be to ...


1

I would take some of the wort and make a starter with the yeast. If the yeast is good it should start fermenting sometime in the first 24 hours. If it doesn't I would throw it in the drain and wait for the new yeast to arrive.


1

I would just leave it. The headspace is full of oxygen - even a gentle shake is enough to increase oxygen absorbtion into the beer. I would simply leave the beer standing as it is, which exposes the smallest surface area to oxygen. Oxygen uptake leads to sherry/cardboard flavours later, or just generally dulling of the beer flavor and faster staling. The ...


1

It will eventually get to a state where the sugar is evenly distributed, but there's nothing stopping from you helping it get there. Gently turn the bottle upside down, then right-side up. Repeat a couple times.


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