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7

There are good answers about removing yeast cells from existing homebrew. But your question asks about "yeast taste" - this is not just particulates. So I wanted to add an answer covering some of this. There are many flavours generated by yeast during fermentation. There are two ways to common ways minimise these flavours: Use a "POF Negative" yeast ...


6

Different water profiles can change the taste of your beer. Especially when you brew a beer with - as you say - "nothing [...] complex with tastes". When there is no big hop aroma or lots of alcohol in the beer, the subtle influence of the water shines through. The water chemistry can accent the hop bitterness, and it can also support the malt flavours. ...


5

For starters they are different styles of beers. Light lagers have a much lighter mouthfeel almost watery. Cheap commercial versions supplement the mash with corn or rice to keep the ABV high but calories down resulting in Light malt profile. A Regular Lager like Old English or Budweiser have less adjuncts like corn or rice and more true malted grains ...


5

Re: malty For me, malty is one of those kind of 'irreducible' qualities, i.e. it's hard to describe exactly what else it tastes like besides malt, in the same way that it's hard to say exactly what 'grape-y' tastes like, aside from 'like grapes'. A very large part of maltiness as a distinct flavor is melanoidins, the product of Maillard reactions between ...


5

smelled horrible -- like butyric acid, so I know it got colder than the recommended temperature Butyric acid producers like Clostridium favor temps around 104°F (37°C), which is also a similar temp as what is favored by some lactobacillus strains, so they way you control its production is by lowering the wort pH. but then thought to try and add some ...


5

Wait!!! Does the beer taste good? If so, just leave it, it wont be as bitter as the recipe sure, but good beer is good beer. It's probably OK. Hop additions are numbered by the amount of boil time in minutes. So a 60 minute addition boils for 60 minutes, and a 0 minute (or "flameout") is added at the end of the boil. So given you reversed your hop ...


4

MBT (more often referred to as skunking or light-struck) is an off-putting flavor and aroma characteristic that is intuitively named after the animal which is well known for dispensing what is considered to be the Satan's post-apocalyptic butthole of all off-flavors. The chemical composition and odor of MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) is very similar to ...


4

Dry apple cider usually takes several months to a year in the bottle to smooth out. I would not concern myself much with how it tasted at 4 weeks. If you want a sweeter cider that is ready to drink in 4-5 weeks, take a look at my answer in this question: Sweet sparkling cider without pasteurizing, sulphites or lactose Make a "graff" which is a malted ...


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


4

Yes, water has drastic effects on your beer. Your recipe, being simple, lends to allowing the water profile to shine. Even though your water source is close in local, different wells and Processing can contain different minerals and salts or chemicals for sanitation. Water is generally 90%+ of your beer. Volumes can be written about how ions in water ...


3

Generally the temperature of the mash can give a thicker consistency to the beer as you move from 63-68 degC for you mash temperature the high you go the more dominant alpha-amylase will be. This cleaves off unfermentable tri-saccharides (three unit sugars) which give a full mouth feel, where as beta amylase which is most active ~63-64 degC cleaves single ...


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


3

There are four important regions of hop cultivation: N-America, UK, Continental Europe and Australia/NZ. There is a general assessment that each region is tends towards hops with certain characteristics. Resin, Floral, Spicy and Fruit are the most common, but is not a finite list. That may be a good starting point. A couple from each region I would select ...


3

Did it pssst when you opened the bottle? I leave my bottles one week at ferm temperature, then 3 weeks as cool as possible to help the CO2 get absorbed in to the beer to make it fizzy.


3

The smell is hard to describe, especially to someone who grew up where there are no skunks. It is not really useful for me to tell you it smells like skunk musk. I have heard some of those people describe it as the smell of burnt rubber, body odor combined with burnt popcorn, sour coffee, or certain strains of aromatic marijuana. You really have to try it ...


3

It's tasting like wine because there are almost no sugars left in the cider. With no sugar, you really notice the acidity in cider which makes it taste more like wine. (I would say it's more like white wine than, red, but that's subjective). You could try sweetening the it to see if that makes it taste more like cider, and less like wine. Buy a can of apple ...


3

Using today's highly modified malts, mash temp makes a lot less difference than it used it. I'd say it's the rye. I have made many, many rye beers and as the % of rye rises, the beer gets a thicker, more intense mouthfeeel.


3

What was your OG and your FG? How long did you wait before drinking? It's an ale yeast, which means that fermentation temperature should be more between 16° C and 24° C. It also says 'California Ale' yeast, which should give it a better resistance against relatively high temperatures, because fermenting in California will most of the time be at higher ...


3

Yes, water has a decent impact on flavor and mouthfeel of beer. Mineral composition of the water will affect flavor. In beer clone recipes it's not uncommon to see a specification of the mineral composition. Additionally, I've read that river water have a tendency to change minerals contents depending on the season. The alkalinity and acidity of the ...


3

It's probably simpler to prepare a solution with CaCl2. For every gram of CaCl2, take 2 gram of distilled, demineralised or reverse osmosis water. Mix well, so you obtain a solution of 33% (W/W) CaCl2. Then, if you know the amount you used for adding to your bottles, take 3 times the amount of solution. I am pretty sure it will only be drops that you will ...


2

I don't think that it will change from wine taste to cider taste. I have done the same thing using Lalvin EC1118 yeast which turned out to taste like wine. What is happening is the yeast had eaten all of the sugars in the cider giving it a higher alcohol content and the wine taste. If you used a different yeast then some of the sugars would have been left ...


2

There are a lot chemical compounds that contribute to the overall taste/aroma/etc of a beer let alone the proportions of each said compounds. Unless those 32 tests are incredibly comprehensive, I am guessing it could probably at only guess at beer category. The yeast make up around 600 chemical compounds alone. Most of those compounds are barely perceivable ...


2

You did no harm by adding all that yeast, but it very likely was unnecessary. The 11 gram yeast pack by itself would have been sufficient. The 7 gram would not. It's pretty hard to predict FG accurately unless you've made a recipe several times. If I was to shoot in the dark, I'd guess you'll finish in the mid 20s. But that's only a guess.


2

Sweetness does overlap with maltiness, but sweetness definitely can come from things besides the final gravity. Maltiness can come from high mash temps, and at least in my beers they seem to not be too sweet. When I mash high, but without a lot of specialty malts, I get an increase in body, and a nice thick head but the beer can still be kind of plain. (...


2

I'd say Amarillo. It's a west coast hop but not quite as widely used as Cascade. You could try Simcoe, as well, for the same reasons.


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


2

I can think of two reasons why your mead is sour: Pomegranate juice is sour, with a pH of around 3.0. Assuming you've made 1 gallon batch, 16oz of pomegranate juice is enough to be noticeably tart. 16 oz of a pH 3.0 liquid diluted to 1 gallon yields a pH of around 3.9 which, without any sugar to balance the acid, would taste quite sour. Your mead was ...


2

In reality if the brew is that malodorous and sour to taste then it is probably worth discarding. 1.75 gals is nothing in the greater scheme of things. The alternative is attempting to drink it! :0( However as this is more of an experiment than a production run - why not keep it and see what happens. If you have a the spare space and the container is spare ...


2

In a sour ale the acid is suppose to balance the malt opposed to hops bittering to balance. Sounds like you have an acid base for a blending batch. If you have a PH meter check it. Then blend with a normally fermented beer that has little hop bittering to get to a pH typical of the sour style you're going for.


2

The most common ways I’ve come across to keep a beer (and perhaps ale specifically) free from yeast in suspension is to: mature the beer properly and let the yeast fall out of suspension due to inactivity (patience is king when making beer) use fresh yeast and if necessary cold crash the ale for a few days if neither of the above options suffices you can ...


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