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8

Not in my experience. I did a test where I used corn sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, honey and DME (maybe even something else) and also force carbonated a split batch. After 2 months of conditioning, none of the tasters in a blind test could distinguish one from the other, and no one exhibited a preference for any one method.


8

I would get hold of another sachet of yeast as a backup. If you have a local homebrew store, almost any type of yeast will work for this kit, but I'd recommend Safale US-05 if you can get that, since that will give you a cleaner profile. If they have liquid yeasts, then Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001 will produce equivalent results. Once you've got hold of ...


6

An biology take on it: Aroma: Perceived through your nose Flavor: Mostly perceived through your tongue although the aroma also helps your brain on forming the overall impression (think how things taste 'bland' when your have a flu and your nose is blocked)


6

Different water profiles can change the taste of your beer. Especially when you brew a beer with - as you say - "nothing [...] complex with tastes". When there is no big hop aroma or lots of alcohol in the beer, the subtle influence of the water shines through. The water chemistry can accent the hop bitterness, and it can also support the malt flavours. ...


6

There are good answers about removing yeast cells from existing homebrew. But your question asks about "yeast taste" - this is not just particulates. So I wanted to add an answer covering some of this. There are many flavours generated by yeast during fermentation. There are two ways to common ways minimise these flavours: Use a "POF Negative" yeast ...


5

A few possible reasons come to mind: If you have added the same amount of sugar to each bottle (as opposed to adding directly to your bucket) then you have different "gravities" and depending on how much it's fermented, different flavour profiles. If you have left a large headspace in the bottle during the carbonation phase, you might find that the ...


5

Re: malty For me, malty is one of those kind of 'irreducible' qualities, i.e. it's hard to describe exactly what else it tastes like besides malt, in the same way that it's hard to say exactly what 'grape-y' tastes like, aside from 'like grapes'. A very large part of maltiness as a distinct flavor is melanoidins, the product of Maillard reactions between ...


5

For starters they are different styles of beers. Light lagers have a much lighter mouthfeel almost watery. Cheap commercial versions supplement the mash with corn or rice to keep the ABV high but calories down resulting in Light malt profile. A Regular Lager like Old English or Budweiser have less adjuncts like corn or rice and more true malted grains ...


5

smelled horrible -- like butyric acid, so I know it got colder than the recommended temperature Butyric acid producers like Clostridium favor temps around 104°F (37°C), which is also a similar temp as what is favored by some lactobacillus strains, so they way you control its production is by lowering the wort pH. but then thought to try and add some ...


5

Wait!!! Does the beer taste good? If so, just leave it, it wont be as bitter as the recipe sure, but good beer is good beer. It's probably OK. Hop additions are numbered by the amount of boil time in minutes. So a 60 minute addition boils for 60 minutes, and a 0 minute (or "flameout") is added at the end of the boil. So given you reversed your hop ...


4

Adding simple sugars like sucrose dextrose increases the alcohol content of the beer, but contribute nothing in the way of body or malt flavour. Beers brewed with a significant amount of these sugars are often described as "cidery", which might be similar to what you're calling "wine like". Next time, try brewing an all-malt kit, i.e. one that does not ...


4

As you reduce the temperature you need to compensate with more yeast, just as you do when brewing a lager. E.g. for a 1.050 ale fermented at 60°F a 2 liter starter would be the minimum. Alternatively, if pitching from a smaller starter, increase the temperature slowly after primary fermentation is almost complete - e.g. 3 days or when you hit 75% of ...


4

In terms of the basic senses, flavor comes from the sense of taste, which is primarily from the tongue. There are 5 types of flavor the tongue can detect: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and savory (the last one is a relatively new discovery.) Our sense of smell can detect an almost infinite number of different smells, since a single smell is really a combination ...


4

Sugar adds alcohol and lowers body. Small amounts of table sugar won't affect flavor much, but large amounts can yield a taste that's described as "cidery". Brown sugar will add some small amount of flavor, but not as much as you might expect. If you like your dark ales light bodied and high alcohol, go ahead and add some sugar. It's not, as far as I know, ...


4

MBT (more often referred to as skunking or light-struck) is an off-putting flavor and aroma characteristic that is intuitively named after the animal which is well known for dispensing what is considered to be the Satan's post-apocalyptic butthole of all off-flavors. The chemical composition and odor of MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) is very similar to ...


4

Dry apple cider usually takes several months to a year in the bottle to smooth out. I would not concern myself much with how it tasted at 4 weeks. If you want a sweeter cider that is ready to drink in 4-5 weeks, take a look at my answer in this question: Sweet sparkling cider without pasteurizing, sulphites or lactose Make a "graff" which is a malted ...


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


4

Yes, water has drastic effects on your beer. Your recipe, being simple, lends to allowing the water profile to shine. Even though your water source is close in local, different wells and Processing can contain different minerals and salts or chemicals for sanitation. Water is generally 90%+ of your beer. Volumes can be written about how ions in water ...


3

The smell is hard to describe, especially to someone who grew up where there are no skunks. It is not really useful for me to tell you it smells like skunk musk. I have heard some of those people describe it as the smell of burnt rubber, body odor combined with burnt popcorn, sour coffee, or certain strains of aromatic marijuana. You really have to try it ...


3

Sugar itself isn't the problem, but the amount of sugar might be. In general, you want sugar to be less that 25% of the total fermentables in your beer. A high percentage of sugar, combined with the high temps you fermented at, could very well be the cause of your problem. In the future, choose a kit that uses only a small amount of sugar, if any, and keep ...


3

Did it pssst when you opened the bottle? I leave my bottles one week at ferm temperature, then 3 weeks as cool as possible to help the CO2 get absorbed in to the beer to make it fizzy.


3

It's tasting like wine because there are almost no sugars left in the cider. With no sugar, you really notice the acidity in cider which makes it taste more like wine. (I would say it's more like white wine than, red, but that's subjective). You could try sweetening the it to see if that makes it taste more like cider, and less like wine. Buy a can of apple ...


3

There are four important regions of hop cultivation: N-America, UK, Continental Europe and Australia/NZ. There is a general assessment that each region is tends towards hops with certain characteristics. Resin, Floral, Spicy and Fruit are the most common, but is not a finite list. That may be a good starting point. A couple from each region I would select ...


3

Yep, it seems it does affect it. You will get lower carbonation at higher elevation and also the boil temperature is lower in higher elevation. See a forum post and communication on HomeBrewTalk: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/effects-altitude-carbonation-1523/ "The other issue is when you drink the beer. Since you are at altitude when you open and drink ...


3

The most common methods of carbonating your beer will not offer differing flavor profiles, but there are exceptions. When force carbing, your only addition to the beer is the gas itself, CO2. When using corn sugar, your addition to the beer is 100% fermentable, so the CO2 gas your looking for is created, with no sweetness (or flavor) left behind. The ...


3

The problem: As C4H5As said, the half-full bottle may have been under-carbonated due to having so much headspace. You also may have had more oxidation due having so much more air in the bottle initially. John Palmer has a list of Common Off-Flabors and says that oxidation causes "wet cardboard or sherry-like flavors". The solution: When I'm bottling, I ...


3

I use ale yeasts at fairly low temps all the time and I haven't experienced any so far that have negative characteristics at 60F. Some, like WY1007, 1728, or 1056 even work fine down into the 50s. Yes, a lower temp will produce fewer esters, but in general that's what I'm looking for. Whether fewer esters are a positive or negative effect depends on what ...


3

Depending on the type of sugar that you added it will give different tastes. If you have used regular table sugar (cane sugar) this might be the cause of the "off" flavour that you have experienced. Normally in any brew it is normal to use malt sugars for beer, these are added from malted grains (such as barley or wheat) and are the cause of the so called "...


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


3

Generally the temperature of the mash can give a thicker consistency to the beer as you move from 63-68 degC for you mash temperature the high you go the more dominant alpha-amylase will be. This cleaves off unfermentable tri-saccharides (three unit sugars) which give a full mouth feel, where as beta amylase which is most active ~63-64 degC cleaves single ...


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