5

The only real difference between pale and pils malt is about 1L of color. The flavor is actually pretty similar. The best thing to do is to experiment with different pale malts to see if on brand is closer to what you want. In terms of what you've got right now, an all pale malt mash will taste remarkably similar to an all pils malt mash. I've done the ...


3

I've done a couple of 1 gallon batches to see what it would do, and they came out decent. I've found that Agave nectar can be tricky to ferment, and it takes a long time. If you proceed as if you are making mead, you should get decent results. I also recommend a yeast nutrient. I found about 4 lbs. of raw, blue agave nectar per gallon works well. My ...


2

You can kick up a fuss you'd be justified as it is not what you ordered. But, I'd just throw in some extra Dark Patent Malt and Roasted Barley, may be an extra .5lb of each to try and pull back the colour. Adding extra Roasted barley may lead to a more harsh bitterness, but adding more patent black should be OK. If you do nothing you should end up with a ...


2

I'm sure you'll be fine with the cara-blonde - that's only a few shades lighter than carapils. It really depends upon what other crystal malts are in the brew. If there are other crystals around the 20-40L, then you may not need so much of the carablonde. Then you could use 250g of that, and 250g of base malt, to avoid it becoming too sweet.


2

One thing I have begun to experiment with is a double fermentation of my apple cider into a more potent agave fermented cider-wine. I start off with the the traditional cider making of my apple cider. Then when it has stopped fermenting I add more sugar (agave) and the fermenting continues. This increases the alcohol percentage from 7%the to anywhere up to ...


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